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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Your parents like anyone will know, whatever you put into work you get out! You can't blame society for parental failures. If you put a child on this planet its your responsibility to bring them up.
    Yeah but that is idealism.

    All sorts of people have kids.

    The system to be honest is biased towards the rich - as the rich are likely to have the money to give their kids the best start in life.
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    i feel for you OP!!! theres nothing you can do apart from move on and apply for another company.
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    Find volunteer work relevant to what you want to do, get plenty of volunteer hours in. This will suck because you won't be getting paid and will probably get exploited for stuff like making tea or filing/photocopying or what ever you end up doing (not sure what MORSE stands for). Try and get enough relevant experience under your belt, then apply for jobs anyway with you 2:2 but talk the **** out of that experience and make your whole application about that, tailor your CV for the role also.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Not everyone can afford to go to Eton or Harrow Sloane.
    Some parents aren't willing to work 15-16 hour days to make the money necessary for an Eton or Harrow. You can't blame for failing to be a successful human being. Ive been doing long days, just walked down a dual carriageway to get a Hanger in Gatwick to get to a client that is commitment. People are reluctant to do certain things to provide. Just like with degrees to get a 1st you need to dedicate yourself, I personally will go for a 1st. First time I did GCSE Double Awards Science DD. But im prepared to commit to my course, you need to confront your parents not me.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Yeah but that is idealism.

    All sorts of people have kids.

    The system to be honest is biased towards the rich - as the rich are likely to have the money to give their kids the best start in life.
    People work to get money or find ways to do so. If they are reluctant to do so, then that is an issue you need to bring up with them not me.I would work 7 days a week to make sure my kids have the best, Im not an entirely selfish person, unlike some people.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    People work to get money or find ways to do so. If they are reluctant to do so, then that is an issue you need to bring up with them not me.I would work 7 days a week to make sure my kids have the best, Im not an entirely selfish person, unlike some people.
    You are missing the point, there will always be 'rich and poor' people. It doesn't mean that you make life harder for those trying to break out of the cycle by creating an education system that is biased towards the rich.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Some parents aren't willing to work 15-16 hour days to make the money necessary for an Eton or Harrow. You can't blame for failing to be a successful human being. Ive been doing long days, just walked down a dual carriageway to get a Hanger in Gatwick to get to a client that is commitment. People are reluctant to do certain things to provide. Just like with degrees to get a 1st you need to dedicate yourself, I personally will go for a 1st. First time I did GCSE Double Awards Science DD. But im prepared to commit to my course, you need to confront your parents not me.
    That is no excuse for state schools to have poor teaching, or misinforming students.

    And you make it sound so black and white, when it isn't.

    Say you are an economic migrate, you are working in a minimum wage job, you will be barely making ends meet to support yourself and your child , let alone make enough money to pay for school fees.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    They are just pieces of paper, high end grads with PHDs from Oxford/Harvard wouldn't usually waste their time in schools. So they are bad role models, university lecturers that is a step up. A cabbage can teach in a school, we pay for what we get for. A **** teacher in a school on £30k i wouldn't let them influence me. They wouldn't make me £££.
    I'm not sure how being a teacher made him a bad role model. I met some excellent role models in my time at school - for some people money is not the only thing in the world, and £30k isn't even a bad salary.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    You are missing the point, there will always be 'rich and poor' people. It doesn't mean that you make life harder for those trying to break out of the cycle by creating an education system that is biased towards the rich.
    People create their own misery its up to them to find outs. We live in one of the best countries in the world to make money. If you want your kids to have the best of everything you do it now. I have no kids at 26, but I have started up funds so that they will have an even better education then I did. There is only so many drugs, prostitutes/escorts, alcohol and gambling someone can do remember that, some people are just plain selfish.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    People create their own misery its up to them to find outs. We live in one of the best countries in the world to make money. If you want your kids to have the best of everything you do it now. I have no kids at 26, but I have started up funds so that they will have an even better education then I did. There is only so many drugs, prostitutes/escorts, alcohol and gambling someone can do remember that, some people are just plain selfish.
    The point is, that is no excuse for there not to be a reform in regards to how corporate companies recruit people.

    It is crude way of doing things - basically if you mess up once, you are disqualified. No second chances, and promotes elitism.
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    (Original post by Nomes89)
    The problem is we're in a completely different climate now - far more people have good degrees now than 20 years ago so because the number of eligible candidates have gone up, cruder methods have to be used to cull the numbers. That's why these filters and tests tend to be used by bigger companies while smaller ones only ask for CVs.

    Plus on another level I don't think someone who has done MORSE at Warwick is automatically better than someone who has gone to a 'worse' university because a degree in itself doesn't say anything about a person's interpersonal skills, commercial awareness, how well they can apply their learning to real life situations etc.

    I'm glad someone said this. A 2.1 is not the only thing employers look at, it's also your extracurriculars and work experience. Someone may have got a 2.1 from London Met and have a dazzling C.V to back it up which instantly makes them a better candidate than someone who got a 1st from Oxford with a less impressive C.V

    A 2.2 is not the end of the world, especially if you have a C.V which makes you stand out from the crowd. However, if you have a 2.2 and nothing else to show for your time at university then you've wasted your time.


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    (Original post by CJKay)
    I'm not sure how being a teacher made him a bad role model. I met some excellent role models in my time at school - for some people money is not the only thing in the world, and £30k isn't even a bad salary.
    A failure in life.... If you want mediocrity go ahead have a teacher as a role model. Considering £24k is like average, £30 is bad its about £24k after tax, £2k a month, you can't do very much with that in this day and age. At the same time someone people have no options, they were very unlikely the best at school or in their respective years.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    A failure in life.... If you want mediocrity go ahead have a teacher as a role model. Considering £24k is like average, £30 is bad its about £24k after tax, £2k a month, you can't do very much with that in this day and age. At the same time someone people have no options, they were very unlikely the best at school or in their respective years.
    You seem to think I am in a low-paying line of work lol.
    £30k is a graduate salary here, but why should I not have role models that earn less than that? Why do you feel somebody's salary defines them?
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    The point is, that is no excuse for there not to be a reform in regards to how corporate companies recruit people.

    It is crude way of doing things - basically if you mess up once, you are disqualified. No second chances, and promotes elitism.
    It promotes the best of the best, not everyone is going to be good. You have "good eggs and bad eggs" just like Jose Mourinho said. At the same time its not for the state to bring you up. Its your parents that influence you, if they are bad influences likelihood you will be the same. If you have a problem with them speak to them.
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    (Original post by CJKay)
    You seem to think I am in a low-paying line of work lol.
    Oh i don't I was referring to a teacher as a whole, haven't a clue what you do. But to let an average teacher or typical state school teacher into shaping your decisions in life is horrifically bad.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    It promoted the best of the best, not everyone is going to be good. You have "good eggs and bad eggs" just like Jose Mourinho said. At the same time its not for the state to bring you up. Its your parents that influence you, if they are bad influences likelihood you will be the same. If you have a problem with them speak to them.
    It isn't promoting the best of the best though.

    Some people mature later in life academically, once they are put into the right environment. That's why you have some people who go onto get 2.1s then a masters from a RG/top uni, yet are still barred from applying due to UCAS points.

    if anything the current system is promoting a certain demographic, the wealthy.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Oh i don't I was referring to a teacher as a whole, haven't a clue what you do. But to let an average teacher or typical state school teacher into shaping your decisions in life is horrifically bad.
    Hardly. They decided what was best for me, and they turned out to be correct.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Oh i don't I was referring to a teacher as a whole, haven't a clue what you do. But to let an average teacher or typical state school teacher into shaping your decisions in life is horrifically bad.
    Probably the most idiotic comment I have read for a while.

    A teacher is no different to a doctor in the sense that they are deemed as individuals with a huge amount of responsibility/power. Students place trust in them to do their job well, in the same way you would with a doctor.

    The whole point of their job is to create productive members of society through education, by helping them harness their potential. If a teacher is not dong this, then there should be a reviewal process for why students are under performing.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    It isn't promoting the best of the best though.

    Some people mature later in life academically, once they are put into the right environment. That's why you have some people who go onto get 2.1s then a masters from a RG/top uni, yet are still barred from applying due to UCAS points.

    if anything the current system is promoting a certain demographic, the wealthy.
    Getting a 2:1 is guaranteed if you just do the work "properly". Also you create your environment you live in and you choose your friends and the family you choose to entertain. Learn to cut wasters off, as for Russell Group, its not that hard to get in. Just about saying the right things, you don't need the greatest grades. I still have a D is GCSE Physics and my Double Award Science is still DD. Its about how you come across and your worth an institution. Same as with jobs if a company sees value in you, they will hire you.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Getting a 2:1 is guaranteed if you just do the work "properly". Also you create your environment you live in and you choose your friends and the family you choose to entertain. Learn to cut wasters off, as for Russell Group, its not that hard to get in. Just about saying the right things, you don't need the greatest grades. I still have a D is GCSE Physics and my Double Award Science is still DD. Its about how you come across and your worth an institution. Same as with jobs if a company sees value in you, they will hire you.
    The point is, RGs are seen as good unis.

    If someone goes through all that effort to get a masters following a 2.1 from a 'lesser uni', they should be taken into consideration. Currently with the way things are, they are not.

    You can spin this however you want, but whatever way you look at it - it is biased towards those that have had the best starts in life. Which is unfair.

    What you don't seem to understand either, it takes effort getting a 2.1. There is nothing stopping someone going to uni and getting a 2.2/underperfoming like they have in their ALs. The fact that they haven't shows maturity and the willingness to succeed by putting their past failure behind them.

    This arguably more important in work than being an A grader as it shows how x person deals with set backs.
 
 
 
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