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What were your "wow we're poor" or "wow we are well off" moments when you were a kid? Watch

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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    That doesn't sound plausible to me. University networking is about who you do your course with, who you meet at college and their friends. It's not that much to do with where the college is. I know enough about Cambridge to be pretty convinced that the long term networks someone would connect with who studied there would be far more valuable.
    If you look at alot of the Cambridge alumni etc, a fair amount relative to Imperial go off to carry on with academics. That's still valuable to have, but from my dad's perspective and in particular the industry he is in having access to the financial capital and all the hedge funds in Mayfair was alot more valuable.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    It's not just the West - the growth of inequality is almost just as much a phenomenon in Asia as it is here. Read Piketty.
    Obviously there is inequality everywhere. But the East in general is growing much faster compared to the West which is slowly dying. The Euro has basically failed, the Eurozone is failing, whereas the East are putting in measures to give access to new ways to accumulate wealth etc. Like in Indonesia there are brokers over there making around 40k a week currently, albeit some are doing other things they shouldn't be xD.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    So many stories on this thread about people's families taking a vicious economic battering due to the depression since 2008.

    It underlines the reality, that most people are worse off now than then, apart from a tiny number of very rich families, who have gained hugely. This is supposedly a desirable outcome according to the neoliberal politicians and economists who engineered it.
    My parents weren't affected at all tbh.
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    (Original post by maths learner)
    Obviously there is inequality everywhere. But the East in general is growing much faster compared to the West which is slowly dying. The Euro has basically failed, the Eurozone is failing, whereas the East are putting in measures to give access to new ways to accumulate wealth etc. Like in Indonesia there are brokers over there making around 40k a week currently, albeit some are doing other things they shouldn't be xD.
    The Eurozone may be sluggish, but the North European countries are still much richer on average than the Anglo-Saxon economies.

    Your points about Asia are based on the delusion that their economy has separated, this is false - China is still utterly dependent on the US and Europe and our failure will eventually be theirs - they are already on the edge of a debt/asset bubble style collapse.
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    (Original post by ChickenMadness)
    My parents weren't affected at all tbh.
    Not your problem I guess. No need to bother.
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    When I realised my parents paid for comics and I never thought about it. I had a yearly subscription to Horrible Science for instance.

    When if I needed something, I got it. I didn't have pocket money, it was more a, if you want something honestly enough I got it. It was fair though, maybe if I needed a new phone to stay "in" I got one, but I was always one of the last to get new things.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    The Eurozone may be sluggish, but the North European countries are still much richer on average than the Anglo-Saxon economies.

    Your points about Asia are based on the delusion that their economy has separated, this is false - China is still utterly dependent on the US and Europe and our failure will eventually be theirs - they are already on the edge of a debt/asset bubble style collapse.
    North European are yes, for now. China is dependent on USA and Europe for approximately 30% of its GDP. Structural changes and regualtion are making it more domesticlly independent. Furthermore China is growing at such a pace that it won't be long until it overtakes the US, whose economy is doing pretty awful currently. Plus if Japan does anyworse (if that is even possible) it will get destroyed, if rates move even a few percent Abe is in big trouble. Then it won't be long until Ireland and the UK are getting crushed (in terms of debt to GDP ratio). I think we should stop we are sidetracking the thread.
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    When I wanted a scarlet macaw at the age of 7 because it was pretty. Mother refused. I cried all the way home, father took me back to the store, paid over £3000 for it and told me never to look at the price again. If I like it. Buy it. I think my father regrets saying that to me. I have used it against him.

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    Hmm, never had any experience like that. At least not yet anyway. :dontknow: I know my family are very well off though, but everyone I knew at school seemed to be on the same level of income as my family. None of us were poor or rich, we were all middle or working class.
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    You were poor!

    You lived in a house. We had no house for a period of time, living under a tree by the side of the common in Barnet, with only leaves and twigs for shelter, no trainers and clothes that were not designer labels. My dad used to go to work on foot before we got up and worked seven days a week for long hours, to bring home the odd scraps of food like a bird returning to the nest. No celebrations at Christmas, birthdays or even the Royal Weddings. A holiday was walking down the road to a neighbouring tree taking the twigs, scraps and other detritus with us to avoid our 'house' being robbed.

    And you tell people today and they don't believe you.
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    For me there were a few things that made it plainly obvious we were struggling financially top ones would probably be.

    - When my mum had to work Christmas eve and Christmas day when we were kids because she couldn't afford not to take the shifts.

    -When my packed lunches were bread and butter (before they started offering us free school lunches).

    -Most of my clothes were second hand or hand me downs, own clothes days at school were just a recipe for bullying.

    -When a pack of biscuits or crisps was a major treat

    - the look of confusion and pity on friends faces when they asked me what I got for Christmas or birthdays, that one was probably one the worst.

    -hearing my mum cry at night on the phone about money, that's when I realised mainly and stopped asking for things.

    -never using the heating

    Despite all that I had a great childhood my mum always took great care of us and despite being poor we hardly ever felt it as children.
    I'm not well of at all but we're not poor per se. We just have little room for treats and our purses are usually slim lol. I don't get pocket money, my phone is 3 years old and one winter we were paying 60-something quid a week to heat the house for 3 hours a day. But we're gonna live in a council house so bye bye rip-off bills. We have decent clothes, a roof above us, food, the occasional treat etc so it's basically OK- I'm in between the two. It's a lot better now I have money from college (60 quid a term makes me feel giddy lol). So yeah we only have a bit of money but it's fine. We're the average I guess.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Did anyone have a "wow we're average" moment? :lol:
    Yes.

    To put my situation this way, I'll be a pauper at university, neither my parents, nor the government, can afford to/will give me much money.
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    That awkward moment when we used to live in Mayfair and I thought everyone had the same type of houses :/
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    (Original post by benplumley)
    What do you mean by that? Do real beds not have duvets?
    Duvets straight on the floor
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    When I was at uni I had to travel from Henley on themes. Waiting for the bus, some girls thought I was foreign. I'm from Sheffield, I literally couldn't understand what they were saying. They taught me to talk "properly", not the lazy way like in Yorkshire. By the time I had picked the accent up, everyone at university thought I was from Oxford.

    Now I'm back in Sheffield, even though it has been a year, people have no idea that I'm from Sheffield, and think I'm stuck up because I "Sound Posh". I've not noticed the difference, and I have no idea what I sound like.

    Most of the people don't mind. But some clearly do. It's rather annoying, as I've even left a job over. But I didn't like the job much.

    I don't have as much money as I did. My spending was around £2,400 per week. Clearly it couldn't be sustained, but it wasn't debt. I just had no idea how to manage my money.

    Now I don't have much. But I will build up something, as I'm going to start saving.

    I've cut down my expenses to just food, a gym membership, rent and the internet.

    I don't buy clothes anymore, I have quite a few but I'm still growing, which is going to be a problem.

    I don't socialise anymore. I'm quite adapted to being on my own. It saves money, and as I've learned there's not much benefit in having lots of friends. I still talk to a couple from uni. I don't talk to old freinds from secondary school often.

    When I'm in the work place I only talk to them during working hours, and leaving buildings.

    I don't drink anymore, no do I go out. Infact I don't talk to the people I usually go out with, as far as deleting them from Facebook. Therefore I won't be tempted to go out. In fact I made a new Facebook and deleted my old one. It now looks more professional and doesn't look like I go out every night. I see it more of an extension of my LinkedIn.

    I now have hobbies which aren't expensive, no do they require other people. it allows me to waste time, but it also allows me to actually achieve something.

    I don't plan on getting married, as it just seems a dumb expensive idea. A divorce seems guaranteed.

    I have a schedule, which I keep too. I'm very methodical. I don't plan on saving a huge amount of money, but a realistic one. If I didn't plan ahead I won't be able to save money. When I've saved enough I will put it into assets. I don't plan on sharing it with anyone. I see it more of a retirement fund. Nothing saved nothing gained.
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    (Original post by Scott.)
    When I was at uni I had to travel from Henley on themes. Waiting for the bus, some girls thought I was foreign. I'm from Sheffield, I literally couldn't understand what they were saying. They taught me to talk "properly", not the lazy way like in Yorkshire. By the time I had picked the accent up, everyone at university thought I was from Oxford.

    Now I'm back in Sheffield, even though it has been a year, people have no idea that I'm from Sheffield, and think I'm stuck up because I "Sound Posh". I've not noticed the difference, and I have no idea what I sound like.

    Most of the people don't mind. But some clearly do. It's rather annoying, as I've even left a job over. But I didn't like the job much.

    I don't have as much money as I did. My spending was around £2,400 per week. Clearly it couldn't be sustained, but it wasn't debt. I just had no idea how to manage my money.

    Now I don't have much. But I will build up something, as I'm going to start saving.

    I've cut down my expenses to just food, a gym membership, rent and the internet.

    I don't buy clothes anymore, I have quite a few but I'm still growing, which is going to be a problem.

    I don't socialise anymore. I'm quite adapted to being on my own. It saves money, and as I've learned there's not much benefit in having lots of friends. I still talk to a couple from uni. I don't talk to old freinds from secondary school often.

    When I'm in the work place I only talk to them during working hours, and leaving buildings.

    I don't drink anymore, no do I go out. Infact I don't talk to the people I usually go out with, as far as deleting them from Facebook. Therefore I won't be tempted to go out. In fact I made a new Facebook and deleted my old one. It now looks more professional and doesn't look like I go out every night. I see it more of an extension of my LinkedIn.

    I now have hobbies which aren't expensive, no do they require other people. it allows me to waste time, but it also allows me to actually achieve something.

    I don't plan on getting married, as it just seems a dumb expensive idea. A divorce seems guaranteed.

    I have a schedule, which I keep too. I'm very methodical. I don't plan on saving a huge amount of money, but a realistic one. If I didn't plan ahead I won't be able to save money. When I've saved enough I will put it into assets. I don't plan on sharing it with anyone. I see it more of a retirement fund. Nothing saved nothing gained.
    Good start. The one thing I'd say is you don't want to waste time. Time is the most important asset you have from a financial perspective. You can get more money, but you can never get more time. Use it wisely.
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    (Original post by Dr DaMan)
    Yes.

    To put my situation this way, I'll be a pauper at university, neither my parents, nor the government, can afford to/will give me much money.
    Same here mate. It sucks lol.

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    I found out I was poor when we had to sell the IV house in France and the giant golden statue of my dog outside had to be taken down to build a bridge.

    - every TSR user
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    So many stories on this thread about people's families taking a vicious economic battering due to the depression since 2008.

    It underlines the reality, that most people are worse off now than then, apart from a tiny number of very rich families, who have gained hugely. This is supposedly a desirable outcome according to the neoliberal politicians and economists who engineered it.
    Capitalists have been duping us for a long time. Moving capital to countries like China and allowing them to treat their workers like crap instead, while providing suitable conditions to the majority of Brits has been doing well for the illusion of stability. Especially when it's so easy to blame the people for the failings, ah well you should have worked hard like me (said the guy who was born into a wealthy family).
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    hmm I think looking back to my childhood I now realise 'wow we were poor' but during that time I never really thought about it.

    We used to live abroad, my family were not rich or anything but we lived comfortably, could afford help eg drivers/cooks/au pairs etc... then moving here (when i was around 7) they literally lost everything so we had to live with family friends for a good year, my parents saved up just about enough to rent a small run down flat and did any work they could find... catalogue delivery, working as supermarket assistants etc. But even then I never thought 'wow we are poor', I suppose it never comes to mind as a child? you only notice subtle differences in what you used to be able to do, to what you can no longer do
 
 
 
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