Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • TSR Support Team
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ja1)
    Do Southampton do dissection?


    Posted from TSR Mobile

    It's an optional module in year 3 to do a dissection but we learn anatomy through (in my opinion, far superior) prosection.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Neostigmine)
    It's an optional module in year 3 to do a dissection but we learn anatomy through (in my opinion, far superior) prosection.
    Could you please explain how southampton does it's prosection sessions and why they are so beneficial from what I've heard?

    Thank you


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • TSR Support Team
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by the A* guy)
    Could you please explain how southampton does it's prosection sessions and why they are so beneficial from what I've heard?

    Thank you


    Posted from TSR Mobile

    Each week the lab is set up with specimens from the current topic of learning. This is how a lab session goes:

    Rock up at your timetabled slot
    Put your bags away, get out your exercise book and put your hair/gum etc away.
    Put on lab coat and gloves.

    Go and watch a demonstration by a lecturer or technician
    - This will change each session
    - They demonstrate the more complex ideas on a preprepared specimen
    - This could be the blood supply on a heart, or the perineal triangle for example

    You then "speed date" each table. All the tables have exercises that correspond to the book you're given and it talks you through a specimen. So if you're currently learning about the lungs, it might be a table with lots of bronchi on them and you can explore them looking for the anatomical features and structures. Teachers are there to support you and you have tablets/PCs/books etc in there to guide you. Your peers are also an excellent source of knowledge.

    A lot of the structures you need to learn about are very small, or very hard to distinguish. Nerves arteries and veins often run together and it can be hard to figure out what is what. On the preprepared specimens these are often labelled or tagged so that you can learn to recognise them. There are then other specimens without any labels so that you can assess your learning.

    At the end of each week there is a "test yourself" station set up in the lab for the whole of the next week (so while all the learning is out for week 2, there is a "test yourself on week 1 knowledge" station in the corner). This allows you to check your knowledge as you go!


    The issue with anatomy is that it is huge. And it goes beyond learning names of things as you need to understand the function and the complications etc that arise with each anatomical thing. To dissect takes a LONG time. Students doing prosection already spend upwards of 3-6 hours in the lab a week and our specimens are all ready to go!

    Lots of people have anatomical variation which complicates things. Someone I know in the year above spent a long time dissecting a thyroid out perfectly during her optional model. She was removing layers of tissue systematically and it took her a long time just to find that for some unknown reason this persons thyroid was missing. Some structures are hard enough to find without having to realise that they're not even there.

    And with prosection your specimens are prepared by experts so you're going to get the best view.

    While lots of people are drawn to disection, it is a long process that doesn't seem to be necessary. Bodies are hard to come by and the money can be spend on better resources for learning in my opinion!




    Does that help? Sorry, small essay there!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Neostigmine)
    Each week the lab is set up with specimens from the current topic of learning. This is how a lab session goes:

    Rock up at your timetabled slot
    Put your bags away, get out your exercise book and put your hair/gum etc away.
    Put on lab coat and gloves.

    Go and watch a demonstration by a lecturer or technician
    - This will change each session
    - They demonstrate the more complex ideas on a preprepared specimen
    - This could be the blood supply on a heart, or the perineal triangle for example

    You then "speed date" each table. All the tables have exercises that correspond to the book you're given and it talks you through a specimen. So if you're currently learning about the lungs, it might be a table with lots of bronchi on them and you can explore them looking for the anatomical features and structures. Teachers are there to support you and you have tablets/PCs/books etc in there to guide you. Your peers are also an excellent source of knowledge.

    A lot of the structures you need to learn about are very small, or very hard to distinguish. Nerves arteries and veins often run together and it can be hard to figure out what is what. On the preprepared specimens these are often labelled or tagged so that you can learn to recognise them. There are then other specimens without any labels so that you can assess your learning.

    At the end of each week there is a "test yourself" station set up in the lab for the whole of the next week (so while all the learning is out for week 2, there is a "test yourself on week 1 knowledge" station in the corner). This allows you to check your knowledge as you go!


    The issue with anatomy is that it is huge. And it goes beyond learning names of things as you need to understand the function and the complications etc that arise with each anatomical thing. To dissect takes a LONG time. Students doing prosection already spend upwards of 3-6 hours in the lab a week and our specimens are all ready to go!

    Lots of people have anatomical variation which complicates things. Someone I know in the year above spent a long time dissecting a thyroid out perfectly during her optional model. She was removing layers of tissue systematically and it took her a long time just to find that for some unknown reason this persons thyroid was missing. Some structures are hard enough to find without having to realise that they're not even there.

    And with prosection your specimens are prepared by experts so you're going to get the best view.

    While lots of people are drawn to disection, it is a long process that doesn't seem to be necessary. Bodies are hard to come by and the money can be spend on better resources for learning in my opinion!




    Does that help? Sorry, small essay there!
    This is great, thank you so much, it has all the info I wanted to know, good thing that's it's a small essay lol.

    If possible could you explain slightly more on this speed dating part? Like is it a different type of specimen at each table? Etc

    Thank you again. 😃


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • TSR Support Team
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by the A* guy)
    This is great, thank you so much, it has all the info I wanted to know, good thing that's it's a small essay lol.

    If possible could you explain slightly more on this speed dating part? Like is it a different type of specimen at each table? Etc

    Thank you again.


    Posted from TSR Mobile

    Absolutely.

    So the exercise book has lots of different activities for you to do. Each table corresponds to a specific activity. So One table might be full of hearts for you to find the blood vessels. The next table might also be hearts, but perhaps cut in a different plane to see the valves, ,or attached to large vessels for you to see that.

    It may also just be that one table is hearts and the next is a whole chest to see the placement of the heart in relation to the lungs.


    So while the answer is sort of "yes, different specimens at each table" there is often a little overlap.

    That said, some tables will be plastic models or laminated histological photographs or diagrams. Each activity is slightly different and so each table is different in that respect.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Neostigmine)
    x
    This sounds so much better than our way of doing things.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • TSR Support Team
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ForestCat)
    This sounds so much better than our way of doing things.

    Posted from TSR Mobile

    They've spent a lot of time building up the lab as Southampton used to have a rep for their students not knowing any anatomy. Now it's really amazing! They've invested a lot of time and cash into it and it seems to have worked really well.

    If only they could work on how to stop your clothes from smelling like the lab :sad:.

    Do you do dissection?

    (Original post by the A* guy)
    This is great, thank you so much, it has all the info I wanted to know, good thing that's it's a small essay lol.

    If possible could you explain slightly more on this speed dating part? Like is it a different type of specimen at each table? Etc

    Thank you again.


    Posted from TSR Mobile


    Also worth mentioning there are also online packages you can go through. The lecturers record specimen demonstrations and you can watch them, or they do a a sort of virtual whiteboard where they can draw and you can see what they're drawing while they talk about what they're drawing if that makes sense.

    Lots of different ways to learn it. :yes:.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Neostigmine)
    They've spent a lot of time building up the lab as Southampton used to have a rep for their students not knowing any anatomy. Now it's really amazing! They've invested a lot of time and cash into it and it seems to have worked really well.

    If only they could work on how to stop your clothes from smelling like the lab :sad:.

    Do you do dissection?





    Also worth mentioning there are also online packages you can go through. The lecturers record specimen demonstrations and you can watch them, or they do a a sort of virtual whiteboard where they can draw and you can see what they're drawing while they talk about what they're drawing if that makes sense.

    Lots of different ways to learn it. :yes:.
    Yeah we do dissection. Did some for gi last term and wasn't helpful at all. Got muscular skeletal this term so hopefully it will be better.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hello there.

    I'm wondering if I can ask why the teaching style of Southampton is?
    And also why you chose Southampton over all the Unis in the UK if you don't mind me asking.

    Thanks
    • TSR Support Team
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Type(n))
    Hello there.

    I'm wondering if I can ask why the teaching style of Southampton is?
    And also why you chose Southampton over all the Unis in the UK if you don't mind me asking.

    Thanks

    Mostly lectures based with some small tutorials and group work. Lots of practical sessions. No PBL. Lots of early patient contact too. Have a flick back through this thread and there are lots of these and similar questions answered already :yes:.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    What's the lowest UKCAT score you guys have or have heard of from other people applying that's been invited to interview??


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Who's coming down on the 29th?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey, I was wondering, in your time at Southampton, have you done much/any neuroscience or psychology yet? I looked at the course, and it mentions nervous system briefly. Just wondering. Heading down tomorrow..:eek:
    • TSR Support Team
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by keepchilled)
    Hey, I was wondering, in your time at Southampton, have you done much/any neuroscience or psychology yet? I looked at the course, and it mentions nervous system briefly. Just wondering. Heading down tomorrow..:eek:

    You do neuro during semester 1 (Mainly the structure of the nervous system and the locomotor system). Then your big neuro module is in semester 3 (so in 2nd year) and you do lots and lots.

    Psychology features throughout every year and is important in medicine! We tend to have a combination of psychology/sociology rather than pure psychology but yes!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Neostigmine)
    You do neuro during semester 1 (Mainly the structure of the nervous system and the locomotor system). Then your big neuro module is in semester 3 (so in 2nd year) and you do lots and lots.

    Psychology features throughout every year and is important in medicine! We tend to have a combination of psychology/sociology rather than pure psychology but yes!
    That's fantastic, thank u! Lastly, any tips for tomorrow? Simple dos and don'ts? I tend to get soo nervous. Thanks anyway.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Neostigmine)

    And with prosection your specimens are prepared by experts so you're going to get the best view.

    While lots of people are drawn to disection, it is a long process that doesn't seem to be necessary. Bodies are hard to come by and the money can be spend on better resources for learning in my opinion!
    So informative! Are you able to try dissections if you want, or are you restricted to just observing?
    Prosection sounds like a great idea, ensuring you get a proper look, saving time and money, but it would be nice to have the option of getting some hands on experience, no?
    • TSR Support Team
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by keepchilled)
    That's fantastic, thank u! Lastly, any tips for tomorrow? Simple dos and don'ts? I tend to get soo nervous. Thanks anyway.
    Read your PS before you go. Think of what you want them to know about you and try to get that across. Remember they're not out to trick you, just see if you're a good fit. Stay calm. Ask for questions to be rephrased if you don't understand them. Don't be afraid to ask for a moment to think about an answer rather than just blurting it out... Hope that helps!

    (Original post by Cutie_Pie)
    So informative! Are you able to try dissections if you want, or are you restricted to just observing?
    Prosection sounds like a great idea, ensuring you get a proper look, saving time and money, but it would be nice to have the option of getting some hands on experience, no?

    You can do dissections in 3rd year if you want to. You don't just observe. Anatomy is very hands on, you just don't do the cutting part. You do all the exploring though.


    Personally, no! I don't think it would be nice to do a dissection. I don't see how it would benefit my learning and is totally different from surgery so isn't even useful there. It's a different way of learning but I don't think it's necessary.

    And to be totally honest, anatomy smells. And the smell clings to you. The less time I spend in the lab the happier I am! :teehee:

    For other people dissection is really important, however it seems that the people who care most about it are the ones who haven't started med school yet
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    I have my interview tomorrow and I got 642.5 in my UKCAT which is relatively poor compared to what people are complaining about on here. The UKCAT, I assume, forms a part of the application of which other factors are considered such as your PS, reference, AS grades etc.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hello again.
    Is it true that you get your own personal tutor.
    Thanks. Sorry for all of these questions.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Remedium)
    I have my interview tomorrow and I got 642.5 in my UKCAT which is relatively poor compared to what people are complaining about on here. The UKCAT, I assume, forms a part of the application of which other factors are considered such as your PS, reference, AS grades etc.

    If you meet the minimum requirements for GCSEs and A level predictions (not even AS grades) then the only thing they look at is your UKCAT.



    (Original post by Type(n))
    Hello again.
    Is it true that you get your own personal tutor.
    Thanks. Sorry for all of these questions.
    Yes. They are a clinician or researcher within the hospital and they are yours for your entire 5 years. They write your reference when you leave :yes:.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.