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    wehats peel ??

    (Original post by antigone-)
    I personally feel that referendums will come up in some form, as well as perhaps the impact of AMS because of the recent devolved elections.

    For 10 markers, I do 3 PEEL paragraphs usually and for 25 markers, 4-6 PEEL paragraphs, with at least 2 points for and 2 against. This does entirely depend on the question though.
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    (Original post by antigone-)
    i personally feel that referendums will come up in some form, as well as perhaps the impact of ams because of the recent devolved elections.

    For 10 markers, i do 3 peel paragraphs usually and for 25 markers, 4-6 peel paragraphs, with at least 2 points for and 2 against. This does entirely depend on the question though.
    whats peel?
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    Hey guys,
    what are your predictions for pressure groups and parties???

    and does soemone have a essay plan or model answer for PG's lead to pluralism or elitism and whether they distribute or concentrate powers
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    (Original post by cocapopsxx)
    whats peel?
    Point
    Explanation
    Evidence
    Link
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    (Original post by xxvine)
    Point
    Explanation
    Evidence
    Link
    what do you link?
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    (Original post by cocapopsxx)
    what do you link?
    To the question?
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    How much are we expected to write for the 25 marker? I just did a practice of a part of a past paper and I literally ran out of time on the last word - I had done a quick intro, 3 paragraphs and a conclusion on the 25 marker.. That's all I could get in! Writing like a madwoman!!!! Is this enough?
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    (Original post by Louise12307)
    How much are we expected to write for the 25 marker? I just did a practice of a part of a past paper and I literally ran out of time on the last word - I had done a quick intro, 3 paragraphs and a conclusion on the 25 marker.. That's all I could get in! Writing like a madwoman!!!! Is this enough?
    I would do 4 so you have at least 2 for and 2 against
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    (Original post by Louise12307)
    How much are we expected to write for the 25 marker? I just did a practice of a part of a past paper and I literally ran out of time on the last word - I had done a quick intro, 3 paragraphs and a conclusion on the 25 marker.. That's all I could get in! Writing like a madwoman!!!! Is this enough?
    The timing is a joke tbh
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    (Original post by antigone-)
    I would do 4 so you have at least 2 for and 2 against
    Hey! The specific question I did, there was a for and against within each paragraph. I compared and contrasted that way as opposed to writing separate paragraphs for and against.
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    (Original post by Louise12307)
    How much are we expected to write for the 25 marker? I just did a practice of a part of a past paper and I literally ran out of time on the last word - I had done a quick intro, 3 paragraphs and a conclusion on the 25 marker.. That's all I could get in! Writing like a madwoman!!!! Is this enough?
    You have to do 6 paragraphs in total (and an intro + conclusion) - 3 paragraphs for, and 3 against. I know the timing is ridiculous but I would spend 4-5 mins on each paragraph
    Also, I would advise you to structure each point/paragraph on its own rather than using your evaluating point in the same paragraph. It was a point raised by my teacher that makes the structure of your essay much clearer and coherent. Hope this helps!
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    (Original post by xxvine)
    I thought I would start an official thread since the exam is approaching....

    How is revision going guys...and how many topics are you learning?
    i feel like ive started so late.. i started today bless my soul. my teachers said we only have to revise 3 topics for unit 1 and all four for unit 2... but im just gonna revise 2 for unit 1 and hope that the exam goes in my favour
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    (Original post by Edgar123)
    Does anyone have / know where to find a list of contemporary examples for each topic
    Deffo alevelpolitics.com
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    (Original post by cocapopsxx)
    Hey guys,
    what are your predictions for pressure groups and parties???

    and does soemone have a essay plan or model answer for PG's lead to pluralism or elitism and whether they distribute or concentrate powers
    Hey this is not an essay plan but these are my notes on pluralism and elitism

    What is pluralism?Pluralism is a theory of the distribution of political power. It argues that power is widely and evenly dispersed in society, rather than concentrated in the hands of the elite or the ruling class. They believe that pressure groups promote healthy debate and discussion and therefore strengthen the democratic process.Pluralism is based on the following assumptions:
    • Citizens are represented largely through their membership of organised groups.
    • All groups have a measure of political influence
    • There are many resources and ‘levers’ available to pressure groups( money, protests etc) and these are widely spread
    • No group can achieve a dominant position, because other groups will always challenge them. There is always ‘countervailing power’
    Political Pluralism,Cultural Pluralism,Moral Pluralism.Pluralist- Promote DemocracySupplement electoral democracy
    • Pressure groups keep government in touch with the public between elections. Elections only take place every 5 years, Pressure groups force the government to engage with the people through which their views cannot be ignored.
    • Pressure groups give a political voice to minority groups and articulate concerns that are overlooked by political parties.Elections determine the political direction of the government, where the make policies to appeal to the mass of the electorate,pressure groups express the concerns of minorities. pressure groups like ‘Liberty’ are willing to lobby, or perhaps take legal action, on their behalf. With their greater experience and organisation, pressure groups can ensure that their views are considered.
    Participation:Pressure groups provide opportunities to participate in-between elections. Pressure groups also offer an alternative means of political participation for those who are uninterested in the main political parties, or who feel that their vote is wasted at election time. As membership of the main parties and turnout in elections declines, pressure groups assume an increasingly important role in keeping government informed of public opinion.Education:Pressure groups promote political debate, discussion and argument, this creates a better-informed and more educated electorate. As a result this helps improve the quality of policy. Without pressure groups, the public and media would have to rely a narrow range of political views. They offer alternative points of view and widen the information available to the public. Pressure groups are prepared to ‘Speak truth to power’.The 2016 Act for the Act campaign used the stories of average Britons whose rights had been protected by the Human Rights Act, to expose the public to cases that might not have received much media coverage.The input from pressure groups can greatly help policy formation and implementation. ministers and MPs are rarely experts on every issue, even in areas that they specialise in as a part of a select committee or government department. Pressure groups are regularly consulted so that Parliament can make informed decisions. For example, the British Medical Association is likely to be consulted for medical policies, or Liberty might be consulted for their views on the extradition process, or human rights in the UK. Working with pressure groups helps to address potential problems early on, avoiding issues further down the road. Benefits of competition:They widen the distribution of political power as they compete against each other. This ensure that no group or interest can remain dominant permanently. Elitist- Threaten democracyPolitical Inequality: Pressure groups tend to empower the already powerful. The most successful ones tend to be the ones with wealth and privileged links to the government whereas it should actually be groups with the most support and membership.Non-legitimate power:Pressure groups leaders are not elected. They are therefore not publicly accountable, meaning the influence they exert is not democratically legitimate.Behind the scenes influence:Pressure groups usually exert influence behind closed doors , this is particular with insider groups whose representatives stalk the corridors of power unseen by the public and away from media scrutiny.Tyranny of the minority:Pressure groups typically represent minorities rather than majorities. Minority interests may be put above the interests of the majority. Therefore governments may find it hard to serve public interests as a result of pressure from pressure groups.
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    (Original post by cocapopsxx)
    Hey guys,
    what are your predictions for pressure groups and parties???

    and does soemone have a essay plan or model answer for PG's lead to pluralism or elitism and whether they distribute or concentrate powers
    Hey this is not an essay plan but these are my notes on pluralism and elitism

    What is pluralism?Pluralism is a theory of the distribution of political power. It argues that power is widely and evenly dispersed in society, rather than concentrated in the hands of the elite or the ruling class. They believe that pressure groups promote healthy debate and discussion and therefore strengthen the democratic process.Pluralism is based on the following assumptions:
    • Citizens are represented largely through their membership of organised groups.
    • All groups have a measure of political influence
    • There are many resources and ‘levers’ available to pressure groups( money, protests etc) and these are widely spread
    • No group can achieve a dominant position, because other groups will always challenge them. There is always ‘countervailing power’
    Political Pluralism,Cultural Pluralism,Moral Pluralism.Pluralist- Promote DemocracySupplement electoral democracy
    • Pressure groups keep government in touch with the public between elections. Elections only take place every 5 years, Pressure groups force the government to engage with the people through which their views cannot be ignored.
    • Pressure groups give a political voice to minority groups and articulate concerns that are overlooked by political parties.Elections determine the political direction of the government, where the make policies to appeal to the mass of the electorate,pressure groups express the concerns of minorities. pressure groups like ‘Liberty’ are willing to lobby, or perhaps take legal action, on their behalf. With their greater experience and organisation, pressure groups can ensure that their views are considered.
    Participation:Pressure groups provide opportunities to participate in-between elections. Pressure groups also offer an alternative means of political participation for those who are uninterested in the main political parties, or who feel that their vote is wasted at election time. As membership of the main parties and turnout in elections declines, pressure groups assume an increasingly important role in keeping government informed of public opinion.

    Education:Pressure groups promote political debate, discussion and argument, this creates a better-informed and more educated electorate. As a result this helps improve the quality of policy. Without pressure groups, the public and media would have to rely a narrow range of political views. They offer alternative points of view and widen the information available to the public. Pressure groups are prepared to ‘Speak truth to power’.The 2016 Act for the Act campaign used the stories of average Britons whose rights had been protected by the Human Rights Act, to expose the public to cases that might not have received much media coverage.

    The input from pressure groups can greatly help policy formation and implementation. ministers and MPs are rarely experts on every issue, even in areas that they specialise in as a part of a select committee or government department. Pressure groups are regularly consulted so that Parliament can make informed decisions. For example, the British Medical Association is likely to be consulted for medical policies, or Liberty might be consulted for their views on the extradition process, or human rights in the UK. Working with pressure groups helps to address potential problems early on, avoiding issues further down the road. Benefits of competition:They widen the distribution of political power as they compete against each other. This ensure that no group or interest can remain dominant permanently.


    Elitist- Threaten democracy
    Political Inequality: Pressure groups tend to empower the already powerful. The most successful ones tend to be the ones with wealth and privileged links to the government whereas it should actually be groups with the most support and membership.

    Non-legitimate power:Pressure groups leaders are not elected. They are therefore not publicly accountable, meaning the influence they exert is not democratically legitimate.Behind the scenes influence:Pressure groups usually exert influence behind closed doors , this is particular with insider groups whose representatives stalk the corridors of power unseen by the public and away from media scrutiny.

    Tyranny of the minority:Pressure groups typically represent minorities rather than majorities. Minority interests may be put above the interests of the majority. Therefore governments may find it hard to serve public interests as a result of pressure from pressure groups.

    these have been taken from my textbook and a range of articles my teacher has given me, hopefully this helps XO
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    (Original post by xxvine)
    For the democracy one would you just say....
    Few regular elections
    Pressure groups and different political parties are tolerated
    Judiciary is independent

    Then against..:.
    HOL and monarchy unelected
    PM arbitrary powers
    Struggling to think of what else tbh...?
    Other points for:
    - Civil liberties are protected (to a certain extent) with the Human Rights Act

    Against: civil liberties are being eroded (with the Snooper's Charter, etc)
    - FPTP makes it difficult for smaller parties to win power
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    (Original post by romaiseb)
    Other points for:
    - Civil liberties are protected (to a certain extent) with the Human Rights Act

    Against: civil liberties are being eroded (with the Snooper's Charter, etc)
    - FPTP makes it difficult for smaller parties to win power
    For the UNIT 2 exam could they say assess the advantages of a presidential/parliamentary government?
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    (Original post by lilavocado)
    yup, gonna get some new pens this weekend. what brand do you use?
    Bic. But sometimes a batch won't have a good flow... So buy a few different kinds, the thin black Paper Mate ones are quite good also.
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    (Original post by hw1221)
    For the UNIT 2 exam could they say assess the advantages of a presidential/parliamentary government?
    Nope. They don't do essay questions on that, it could only be a 5 / 10 marker. The only thing close to that if 'to what extent does the executive control Parliament', which was a question 6 - 7 years ago
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    (Original post by popcornjpg)
    Nope. They don't do essay questions on that, it could only be a 5 / 10 marker. The only thing close to that if 'to what extent does the executive control Parliament', which was a question 6 - 7 years ago
    Ohh ok, it was just that on the spec it says that you need to know the benefits and draw backs of each system, so I assumed they could put it as an assess question.
 
 
 
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