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    (Original post by Blue_Mason)
    I ma 21 years of age and I live independently and I pay taxes so.. I know exactly what I am talking about.
    I have experience, maturity and I am more educated, so my vote is more significant as compared to a person doing their a levels.
    Surely our vote is especially important because the government actually decides how we are educated in the first place? Also just us young people being on here and able to argue against you shows we are politically aware. Teenagers who aren't politically aware wouldn't bother fighting for the vote and probably won't bother voting anyway when they get the chance, just like many adults do.
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    It's really hard to get that age group to vote responsibly for 2 main reasons:

    1. There isn't enough education on political issues at that age since politics is not a widely available GCSE subject. They would have to have an interest in politics outside of school and I think for many young people of that age group politics is not a priority.

    2. As a result of the previous point, their opinions can be easily swayed by adult figures in their lives; teachers, parents, neighbours, it's very easy for a 16-18 year old to simply vote for whatever they've been told to vote for as they presumably don't know enough about the implications of what they are voting for.

    Sadly I think this is the reality, feel free to disagree.
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    (Original post by Sarahchuu)
    It's really hard to get that age group to vote responsibly for 2 main reasons:

    1. There isn't enough education on political issues at that age since politics is not a widely available GCSE subject. They would have to have an interest in politics outside of school and I think for many young people of that age group politics is not a priority.

    2. As a result of the previous point, their opinions can be easily swayed by adult figures in their lives; teachers, parents, neighbours, it's very easy for a 16-18 year old to simply vote for whatever they've been told to vote for as they presumably don't know enough about the implications of what they are voting for.

    Sadly I think this is the reality, feel free to disagree.
    Maybe the reason there isn't enough education on politics is because the government don't bother to teach us about it because we can't vote in the first place. If we were given the vote I'm sure the government would overload us with information about it to make sure we voted appropriately (for them ) anyway, if we are just going to go with what our parents say what would that matter, by what your saying it's adults who are the ones mature enough to make decisions so them making the decisions for us? By your reasoning it sounds like I'd be making the right decisions then?
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    (Original post by Blue_Mason)
    I ma 21 years of age and I live independently and I pay taxes so.. I know exactly what I am talking about.
    I have experience, maturity and I am more educated, so my vote is more significant as compared to a person doing their a levels.
    So as i said, not especially old. Having seen your daily threads i do not agree that your are necessarily more mature and you're barely more experienced. Everyone's vote is equal regardless of if you've 18 years life experience or 80.
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    teenhorrorstory you have failed to consider turnout rates.


    (Original post by Mlb37)
    I have to say I agree with you there, my entire family voted out but if I had the chance I would have voted in.
    I really think if they gave 16-18 year olds the education about the referendum (the pros and cons, impacts etc) then the result could have almost definitely gone the other way.
    To be honest I think the main reason why people voted out was to stop immigration and they haven't thought about the other consequences.
    But there we go that's just my opinion.

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    Turnout rate of 36% anyone?
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    (Original post by XcitingStuart)
    teenhorrorstory you have failed to consider turnout rates.




    Turnout rate of 36% anyone?
    Turnout rate of 36% but those of us who voted leave have ruined their future! How are they going to cope now? Sad times ahead oh my days 💤💤💤


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    (Original post by Sacred Ground)
    Turnout rate of 36% but those of us who voted leave have ruined their future! How are they going to cope now? Sad times ahead oh my days 💤💤💤


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    I thought you were a remainer just then for a moment...
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    (Original post by Calev44)
    Maybe the reason there isn't enough education on politics is because the government don't bother to teach us about it because we can't vote in the first place. If we were given the vote I'm sure the government would overload us with information about it to make sure we voted appropriately (for them ) anyway, if we are just going to go with what our parents say what would that matter, by what your saying it's adults who are the ones mature enough to make decisions so them making the decisions for us? By your reasoning it sounds like I'd be making the right decisions then?
    Yes the govt. doesn't even bother teaching us about it because they see it as being futile (low turnout, they don't gain any votes from younger people so why bother etc etc) which is kinda sad in my view cos I love politics.

    And I don't disagree with what you're saying about adults making informed decisions for you, but there's a problem where young people may feel under pressure from family members to vote a certain way. It's kind of like your parents having 2 votes simply because they have kids.
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    (Original post by Sarahchuu)
    Yes the govt. doesn't even bother teaching us about it because they see it as being futile (low turnout, they don't gain any votes from younger people so why bother etc etc) which is kinda sad in my view cos I love politics.

    And I don't disagree with what you're saying about adults making informed decisions for you, but there's a problem where young people may feel under pressure from family members to vote a certain way. It's kind of like your parents having 2 votes simply because they have kids.
    To blame it on the government is simply absurd, the blame lies on those who choose not to vote and possibly the family. It is not the role of the government to teach politics to children and nor should it be as there is so much potential for biases. The simple proof that it is the fault of the non voters and not the government is simply to look at post war turnout:

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    What does this tell you? Those born from the early 70s onwards just do not vote as much as those born before, and it's not even like our grandparents were taught politics in school.

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    (Original post by Nooglepop)
    Yes, they did deserve their say. But so did the many 16 or 17 year olds who will have to live with the consequences of this election for years, possibly for the rest of their lives.
    And so will 6 and 7 year olds. Should they be allowed to vote too?

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    (Original post by Tw1x)
    So not only do we want to give 16-18 year olds the vote, we want to give them the most SIGNIFICANT vote? Not sure that would work so great...
    Probably not the best idea to give a 16 year old such an important vote I do agree.
    What a lot of people have forgotten here is that this conversation started out with a hypothetical what would happen if we let them vote. As in how would it change the result. If it could have been a good idea. Not actually discussing if we should have let them vote. Everyone knows that it would have been a bad idea.
    Though quite frankly a 17 year old is not much different from an 18 year old.
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    (Original post by Calev44)
    Surely our vote is especially important because the government actually decides how we are educated in the first place?

    Not educated but rather indoctrinated and at that vital time in life where you are at the most vulnerable to influence and social conditioning. Hell, if Adele or Lady Gaga got up and said "Hey kids let's rock, vote Leave" then they would all vote Leave.
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    (Original post by Calev44)
    Read a few of these and it seems people are getting confused... Young people don't want to take away the vote from old people but instead simply think that it is unfair old people get it when we don't. It will affect us and not them and if mistakes were made we will have to deal with the repercussions. Further more children who aren't politically aware are less likely to be bothered to vote in the first place. Only those interested in politics are likely to vote and these types of people are not those to be influenced by parents/medi, I mean take a look at out youth parliament for a start.
    I completely agree. So many people are claiming the young are showing ageism by saying we (like everyone else, including the elderly) deserve a vote, but at the same time they are stereotyping young people as stupid, lazy and uninterested in politics, which is surely also ageist. I couldn't agree with you more.
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    (Original post by Nooglepop)
    I completely agree. So many people are claiming the young are showing ageism by saying we (like everyone else, including the elderly) deserve a vote, but at the same time they are stereotyping young people as stupid, lazy and uninterested in politics, which is surely also ageist. I couldn't agree with you more.
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    Says something. So many young people are so disinterested and/or lazy and/or stupid that despite those who voted in the 18-24 category voting remain about three times as much as leave, when the whole cohort is taken into effect they have the lowest remain vote of any age group. The young cannot blame the old for brexit, they can only blame their non voting peers.

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    yeah, well, they're too young. "old people" aren't too young though - they've had more experience than younger people overall too, to boot.
    16 years old is 2 years before they even leave school at this stage
    if you agree that kids should stay in school until 18, which is most people from my experience, you have no right to argue that 16 year olds should vote, because you're saying that they're somehow intelligent enough to vote (which is the right which underpins all our liberties) yet they're not intelligent enough to live an independent adult life at 16 by leaving an institution like school which is for education (implying that they're not intelligent enough to go out into the world yet)

    also, arent you forgetting that 18-25 year olds only turned out at a rate of 37%?
    they simply weren't aware or concerned enough to vote, compared to the older, wiser generations.
    if they should have voted, then why did their slightly older counterparts in the youngest voting block show such apathy?
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    (Original post by teenhorrorstory)
    If 16-18 years old were allowed to vote in the referendum, then it's very likely that remain would have actually won. There's a very clear trend that shows how the elderly are very anti EU while the younger people tend to be pro EU. It's very frustrating for me as a 17 year old to see decisions being made by people who will honestly die within the next 10 years while I am unable to have a say. The future belongs to us, the youth.
    Hopefully more than 35% would vote unlike the 18-24 year olds
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
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    Says something. So many young people are so disinterested and/or lazy and/or stupid that despite those who voted in the 18-24 category voting remain about three times as much as leave, when the whole cohort is taken into effect they have the lowest remain vote of any age group. The young cannot blame the old for brexit, they can only blame their non voting peers.

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    I'm not blaming the old for brexit. There were elderly people who voted remain, middle aged people who voted leave and young people who voted leave. It would be stupid to hold any particular age group as being responsible for the decision. But I can't blame my peers (15 and 16 year olds in year 11) for the decision, because they legally weren't allowed to vote!
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    (Original post by sleepysnooze)
    yeah, well, they're too young. "old people" aren't too young - they've had more experience than younger people overall.
    16 years old is 2 years before they even leave school at this stage
    if you agree that kids should stay in school until 18, which is most people from my experience, you have no right to argue that 16 year olds should vote, because you're saying that they're somehow intelligent enough to vote (which is the right which underpins all our liberties) yet they're not intelligent enough to live an independent adult life at 16 by leaving an institution like school which is for education (implying that they're not intelligent enough to go out into the world yet)

    also, arent you forgetting that 18-25 year olds only turned out at a rate of 37%?
    they simply weren't aware or concerned enough to vote, compared to the older, wiser generations.
    if they should have voted, then why did their slightly older counterparts in the youngest voting block show such apathy?
    Many 16 year olds don't stay in school, they go to college/ sixth form college which is a much ore adult environment with fewer rules and much larger emphasis on responsibility and making your own decisions. 16 year olds can also start apprenticeships or go into vocational training. The huge range of options for post 16 education require adults to trust 16 year olds to make informed decisions about their futures without being influenced too much by their peers.
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    (Original post by Nooglepop)
    Many 16 year olds don't stay in school, they go to college/ sixth form college which is a much ore adult environment with fewer rules and much larger emphasis on responsibility and making your own decisions. 16 year olds can also start apprenticeships or go into vocational training. The huge range of options for post 16 education require adults to trust 16 year olds to make informed decisions about their futures without being influenced too much by their peers.
    yes but the law now in this country since a few years ago is that 16 years olds must do higher education. so basically it's no different to high school because it's the same compulsory education scheme. they're still being told that they're too dumb to live in the real world so why should they be told that they're intelligent enough to vote over it?
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    (Original post by sleepysnooze)
    yes but the law now in this country since a few years ago is that 16 years olds must do higher education. so basically it's no different to high school because it's the same compulsory education scheme. they're still being told that they're too dumb to live in the real world so why should they be told that they're intelligent enough to vote over it?
    It doesn't actually stipulate they must go into higher education, if they are held back 2 years they do not need to touch it, similarly vocational courses or even an outright apprenticeship is allowable.

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