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Universities are already increasing their fees above £9000 Watch

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    (Original post by Aph)
    Out of interest where is that figure from? I've heard 11% is more accurate so I'm just interested.
    I think there's various numbers doing the rounds...

    60% in this one
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...itten-off.html
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    (Original post by MaxReid)
    If you go beyond the headline figure about fees being raised and take a closer look, the increase isn't that bad really.

    Fees were set at £9000 in 2012.
    They are now being raised to £9250, 4 years later.
    A £250 increase means that over the past 4 years the average increase has been £62.50 a year. £250/4.
    £62.50/£9000 means that the increase has been a mere 0.069% each year since 2012.
    This is, as yet, a one-off increase of 0.27%.
    Whether you take the overall figure of a £250 (a 0.27%) increase on £9000 since 2012 or divide it by 4 to work out the average yearly increase since 2012 (0.069%), the increase has been below inflation, which currently stands at 0.3%, according to the BBC.
    The increase therefore is not a big one in my view.
    It's 2.7%, not 0.27%. You've got your figures wrong by magnitude of 10. As a result, your argument completely breaks down.

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    (Original post by She-Ra)
    EDIT! Update: the increase in fees wil now affect current students who are already studying

    Some universities have jumped the gun and declared they will be charging higher tuition fees ahead of the teaching excellent framework (TEF) being signed off by Parliament.

    For Autumn 2017 Durham, Kent and Royal Holloway websites state that their fees will be £9,250 even though Parliament haven't actually signed off the plan for fees yet.

    However, based on the recent mock-up of the TEF only Kent feature in the top 10. You find more information on the TEF here.



    The BBC has also reported that fees could increase up to £10,000 a year over the next 4 years.

    Full report is here

    We also recently published an article on uni fees, the TEF and inflation. You can read it here
    Funny how some people get angry over this increase in fees, but when it comes to taking out the loan, it's happy days.

    edit: how will this affect the people (assuming they start their course in '17/'18 onwards) who decide to move abroad once they've completed their degree?? :/
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    (Original post by cucumberhater)
    edit: how will this affect the people (assuming they start their course in '17/'18 onwards) who decide to move abroad once they've completed their degree?? :/
    No difference. You still have to make repayments if you are employed abroad.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    No difference. You still have to make repayments if you are employed abroad.
    Oh okay. Thanks.
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    (Original post by Newcastle456)
    It's 2.7%, not 0.27%. You've got your figures wrong by magnitude of 10. As a result, your argument completely breaks down.

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    Damn. Got my figures wrong. In any case I don't mind the increase to be honest. Yes it means more debt, but for the university I'm going to I see it as an investment.
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    (Original post by Newcastle456)
    It's 2.7%, not 0.27%. You've got your figures wrong by magnitude of 10. As a result, your argument completely breaks down.

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    This is what happens when you make back of an envelope calculations!
    My figures regarding the real increases in ££s are correct and those increases are not as bad the one-off £250 increase.
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    (Original post by MaxReid)
    Damn. Got my figures wrong. In any case I don't mind the increase to be honest. Yes it means more debt, but for the university I'm going to I see it as an investment.
    Yes but whilst you don't mind, if we remain consistent, fees are going up much more vs inflation.

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