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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    The faith thing- it shouldn't disadvantage you no. Although it is definitely worth thinking about things you've learnt from it that can be applied to other schools Maybe chat with a teacher at the school for advice on how to use it to your advantage at interviews.

    As for the placement... I guess it would depend on what the uni agreed to provide you with when you signed up. I would invasive it was just two placements in primary though

    I would certainly arrange an urgent meeting with a tutor to explain your concerns. Eyfs is very different from KS1 & 2. It's not just younger children, it's a completely different curriculum, methods of assessment and delivery etc. So it is going to be an extra challenge for you to wrap your head around all the new stuff. I'd argue to then that it's going to cause extra strain on you.

    Having said all that... If there isn't a place for you in 5-11, there isn't really much they can actually do about it. The only option would maybe be going further afield. Perhaps there is a school near to some family of yours who you could stay with?

    Also, don't let what I said freak you out! Early years principles can really help and if you are in reception you will learn a lot that you can take up to even year 6, about how children learn etc. Plus the first term of year 1 should still be following the eyfs curriculum, and play is important throughout KS1 and beyond. So if you have to do it, look at it as a learning experience, and contact eyfs specialist tutors on your course as they will owe you the extra support!!!

    Good luck

    Xxx



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    Thanks for that, really helpful. I think I'm just gonna go with it. I'm just worried that there'll be a lot of cleaning to be done. Some kids won't even be toilet trained.

    What is a day in reception like? I'm assuming there's very little teaching and more learning through playing. And how's the marking? Is there a lot to do??

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    Sunflowers - I'm sorry you're having a hard time and I'm glad you took Shelly's advice and shared your problems. I think you'll find most of them are standard PGCE issues that every one of us will be feeling at one time or another.

    I hope you don't take what I'm about to type as a dismissal or anything, because it's not intended that way at all, but I think maybe you need some objectivity. Take a step back, a deep breath and just consider the following:

    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    - I'm working late and having to get up early to complete all the work and marking. I feel burnout isn't far off.
    - The above is affecting me in class.
    Yes, I expect you will be working late and getting up early. I've been getting up at between 4.30am and 5am, getting to work for 7am on the dot, and working solidly through to 6pm, as well as often doing an hour or so at night when I get home (not to mention ALL weekend). I've even gone so far as too book into a hotel nearer school (my commute is 40 mins in the morning and almost an hour at night) so I can get more work done this week! I'm literally sitting in a Premier Inn as I type this!

    It's exhausting, and it's certainly not sustainable, but the PGCE year is notoriously difficult. You just have to get through each half term (or each week, or each day!) one step at a time and give yourself a huge pat on the back each half term.

    The thing is, all teachers work long hours, so if this isn't something you are willing/able to maintain long term, then you might need to do some serious thinking. I believe 50-60 hours a week is the norm even for experienced teachers.

    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    - I get frustrated the students cannot work independently and I have to do everything with them. This is after explaining the task with examples. From primary 5 up, I don't think it's an unreasonable expectation.
    Welcome to teaching. I doubt you will ever find a class where all children will work well without some.... nudging, shall we say! I'm in Y5 and there's one boy who (despite being very bright) simply cannot write more than one sentence without a teacher hovering over him. I've been taking literacy for 2 weeks and every lunch time he has to stay in for an extra half hour to actually get more than 5 words on the page. It's driving me batty, but he needs his education as much as everyone else so I'm persevering. Today I've started moving him to a separate table and told him I'll keep doing so until he can get on. Today he only need 15 minutes at lunch time to finish, so perhaps we're having a breakthrough. That's on top of 3 very low ability chn who need 100% of the TA's time to get anything done, 3 more quite low ability who need a lot of guidence, 1 with behaviour issues and another 20 or so who, for the most part, seem to want confirmation that every single thing they think of is correct before they'll put it down on paper. It's exhausting, but that's what the job it. We're only learning but we'll surely develop strategies to deal with these situations, but to expect a class (any class - EYFS or A level) to work completely without any assistance throughout the lesson is, I would say, quite unreasonable.

    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    -As a result of the previous point, all of my marking and preparation has to be done outside of class.
    Not to be rude, but exactly when else were you expecting to be able to do marking and preparation? If you were under the impression that teachers have the luxury of introducing a topic, setting a task and then sitting there getting on with various jobs while the class just does works perfectly and silently for the next 40 minutes, then I think perhaps your thinking was a tad misguided.

    My marking is done at lunch (when I'm not handholding the affore-mentioned irritatingly lazy child!) and after school, or sometimes before school if I just can't bring myself to do it at night! My preparation is done during my one afternoon of PPA and the weekend, as is the preparation of every other teacher I know.

    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    - Year 8 unruly behaviour. They constantly talk and don't listen. I'm in ESL so many of the students are made to come to class.
    Sorry I'm not sure what ESL stands for and can't comment on Y8, but I've certainly had some unruly classes to deal with. Have you asked for help with behaviour strategies, perhaps from some teachers who also have this specific group of children? There could be some little tricks that work with this class that you haven't tried yet.

    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    -I have to use a textbook that I don't really think is appropriate with them. It's not engaging enough for 13 year old minds. However I don't have the time or energy to look for lots more material.
    You say you 'have' to use the textbook. Is that because the school makes you, or is it mainly because, as you say, you don't have time/energy to find anything else? If the former, that's a shame, but perhaps you can try to liven it up with your delivery of the lessons? If it's the latter, then I really can't suggest anything other than a can of red bull and a bit of perseverance!

    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    -End of term report cards make no difference to attitude or behaviour.
    That's life, unfortunately. The report card is intended to inform parents of a child's performance, not supposed to solve their behaviour problems. Behaviour management is HARD (it's my 2nd biggest issue, behind timings in lessons - oh how wonderful it would be to have time for a proper plenary!!). Read some books, practice changing your tone of voice, use your eyes, follow the school's behaviour policy to the letter. If you can take minutes off of their break times, do that (I had the entire class in this break time to prove they could sit quietly after a particularly fussy afternoon yesterday). There are so many tools for behaviour management, but it is hard getting to grips with them and figuring out which ones work with which children/groups of children.

    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    - I feel like crying all the time.
    I'm honestly not making light of this, truly I'm not, because I spent 6 weeks on the edge of tears on placement in the Autumn term, but.... this is genuinely par for the course as far as your PGCE year goes. I mentioned your post to an NQT at work today and his responses were much like mine, especially regarding this last point. My uni asked us in December to put up our hands if we had not cried since the course started. Not a single hand went up. That was a cohort of 50 or so, with ages from about 23 - 50. Every single one of us had cried. The relief in the room when we all realised we were in it together was palpable.

    I really hope you take all of this in the manner it's intended - i'm not trying to be mean, I'm just giving an impartial outside view to try and help you get a bit of perspective.

    I really hope you start to feel better soon, but if not you MUST go and seek help elsewhere - family, friends, university tutors, your GP...

    You seem quite down based on your recent posts (I'm so glad you've finally opened up about what's been bothering you), and NOTHING is worth risking your mental health.

    Have a good cry, then stick on a song or tv show or something that always raises your mood and try to bring yourself around.

    I promise there is a light at the end of the tunnel.
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    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    - I'm working late and having to get up early to complete all the work and marking. I feel burnout isn't far off.
    - The above is affecting me in class.
    - I get frustrated the students cannot work independently and I have to do everything with them. This is after explaining the task with examples. From primary 5 up, I don't think it's an unreasonable expectation.
    -As a result of the previous point, all of my marking and preparation has to be done outside of class.
    - Year 8 unruly behaviour. They constantly talk and don't listen. I'm in ESL so many of the students are made to come to class.
    -I have to use a textbook that I don't really think is appropriate with them. It's not engaging enough for 13 year old minds. However I don't have the time or energy to look for lots more material.
    -End of term report cards make no difference to attitude or behaviour.
    - I feel like crying all the time.
    Re the burnout thing... You burning out will not help your pupils.

    Make a last of the things you have to do and divide it in to two categories... Urgent and important. Keep in mind that they are not the same thing!!! And include personal things, so a partners birthday for example would be important. And it seems to me that taking a day off or two evenings is urgent and important for you right now. Teachers can't be expected to always be on.

    I find it hard to give an example... in my case for example, writing up the action plan for children is urgent as I need to send to my head of department, but less important as it is purely paperwork (i.e. I am still meeting the childrens needs before I type it up). So if something had to go, that could.

    Xxx

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    (Original post by qwerty_mad)
    Thanks for that, really helpful. I think I'm just gonna go with it. I'm just worried that there'll be a lot of cleaning to be done. Some kids won't even be toilet trained.

    What is a day in reception like? I'm assuming there's very little teaching and more learning through playing. And how's the marking? Is there a lot to do??

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    As a student you shouldn't have to change nappies- it's not appropriate. Also, you are unlikely to have more than one or two. In nursery and only had one before our newbies started this term.

    I have never actually taught reception, only nursery, but have been in receptions and have a general idea. You're likely to have a phonics session, a maths session, a story and another whole class input of some kind throughout the day. Input shouldn't be more than about 15 minutes. The rest of the tine will be playing but there will be adult led stuff within that... Exactly what will depend on how they run it. There might be: readers; activities which everyone must do but delivered individually/to groups, like flash cards, cooking, some kind of craft etc; targeted small group or 1:1 activities based on needs eg. Writing name, working on speech, counting etc; optional adult led activities that the children can choose to access. Also the adults will of course be interacting with the children to move learning on. Some places do a passport system where they have to or are challenged to do certain activities at a time of their choosing.

    Marking- there isn't any marking as such. The assessment is done through recording observations of the children and then adding then to some kind of learning record (usually called a learning journey or learning story) later, along with some kind of link to show the learning demonstrated. Generally you add photos and annotated artefacts (writing, drawing etc) as well. Every setting does learning stories slightly differently, I love looking at other people's! Updating then takes a lot of time but in my experience, less than making, and I find it more fun

    Any more early years questions fire away any time


    Xxx


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    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    - I'm working late and having to get up early to complete all the work and marking. I feel burnout isn't far off.
    - The above is affecting me in class.
    - I get frustrated the students cannot work independently and I have to do everything with them. This is after explaining the task with examples. From primary 5 up, I don't think it's an unreasonable expectation.
    -As a result of the previous point, all of my marking and preparation has to be done outside of class.
    - Year 8 unruly behaviour. They constantly talk and don't listen. I'm in ESL so many of the students are made to come to class.
    -I have to use a textbook that I don't really think is appropriate with them. It's not engaging enough for 13 year old minds. However I don't have the time or energy to look for lots more material.
    -End of term report cards make no difference to attitude or behaviour.
    - I feel like crying all the time.
    I'm sorry to hear teaching is still making you feel so rubbish.

    I'm an NQT and points 1, 3, 4, 5, 7 definitely apply to me too. But I don't feel like crying all the time (have cried a few times, but not constantly) and I do normally find the time to come up with new resources and ideas for my classes (plus anything I can borrow from colleagues and TES).

    Like the previous poster said, I don't mean to be harsh, but are you really sure teaching is the right career for you? I know from your posts that it's been making you miserable for a year or more now.

    Obviously I don't know about your family situation or anything, but if you get the chance to take some time out (maybe when your contract on your current job ends, if you can't get out sooner) I suggest you come home and have a long break to think things through before you decide whether to go back into teaching.

    I think teaching is a great (although often stressful) career, but it is not worth making yourself ill over. If it is detrimental to your health, you need to get out, even if it is just a temporary break.

    All the best.
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    I remember before I applied for the Primary PGCE and reading this forum made me quite nervous. But just to share an experience I don't see much on this thread because each school is very different and each university is also. I am thus far finding the PGCE incredibly manageable. I get to school for 8.35 and leave between 3.05-3.30 depending on if i have a meeting. As I have my own study and no distractions at home I take any work I have home. Get into my PJs with a cuppa, put some obnoxious reality TV on and get into creating fun and structured lessons and resources. Depending on how you decided to do the lesson, the creating of the PPTs and worksheets can be time consuming (I found this with literacy based lessons), so I actually manage to get stuck in on a weekend day and most of the planning/or rough planning done and finish bits off when at home between 4-5.30. Most days after school I get to completely relax if I have finished everything.I am the type of person who itches to do something if they aren't busy anyway, so the workload has never scared me.The school I am at has no teachers staying after 4pm, they are happy to do as much work as they can at home and as long as everyone delivers outstanding lessons everyones happy. The school is rated outstanding and the best in the town.

    Sound too good to be true? Well, it is half true. I am still on my first placement, so I only teach 40 percent - but considering how much free time I have at 40 percent I believe 80 percent next placement will be management and probably busy as hell. But the first half the PGCE isn't hard (well. very much depending on your school or year group - I have year 3!) or stressful at all if it something you enjoy doing... and at least only half of it has the potential to be a bit of a nightmare!
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    I've been goven a Notice of Serious Concern.
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    (Original post by Dpippo)
    I remember before I applied for the Primary PGCE and reading this forum made me quite nervous. But just to share an experience I don't see much on this thread because each school is very different and each university is also. I am thus far finding the PGCE incredibly manageable. I get to school for 8.35 and leave between 3.05-3.30 depending on if i have a meeting. As I have my own study and no distractions at home I take any work I have home. Get into my PJs with a cuppa, put some obnoxious reality TV on and get into creating fun and structured lessons and resources. Depending on how you decided to do the lesson, the creating of the PPTs and worksheets can be time consuming (I found this with literacy based lessons), so I actually manage to get stuck in on a weekend day and most of the planning/or rough planning done and finish bits off when at home between 4-5.30. Most days after school I get to completely relax if I have finished everything.I am the type of person who itches to do something if they aren't busy anyway, so the workload has never scared me.The school I am at has no teachers staying after 4pm, they are happy to do as much work as they can at home and as long as everyone delivers outstanding lessons everyones happy. The school is rated outstanding and the best in the town.

    Sound too good to be true? Well, it is half true. I am still on my first placement, so I only teach 40 percent - but considering how much free time I have at 40 percent I believe 80 percent next placement will be management and probably busy as hell. But the first half the PGCE isn't hard (well. very much depending on your school or year group - I have year 3!) or stressful at all if it something you enjoy doing... and at least only half of it has the potential to be a bit of a nightmare!
    Wow! Congratulations on managing so well. It sounds like you are very good at getting on with things, and not procrastinating

    You are right about it depending on the course and school a lot. On my first placement the kids started at half 8 and finished at half 3. It was EYFS so required at least half an hour of setting up in the morning, more on a lot of days. And staff meetings went on till 4.30/5 on days that we had them, if not I stayed till around the same time setting up the room and adding to learning stories. Luckily I lived close so was home soon but many others in my course had to travel for much longer as well.

    Plus I had two assignments in the first term, although they tried to time those so we had writing up time after finishing placement.

    Xxx

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    (Original post by CTVicky)
    I've been goven a Notice of Serious Concern.
    I'm sorry to hear this - did you suspect this was coming? What do you think has been the problem? Whatever it is I'm sure you can improve and get through it.

    ---------

    Only 3 more weeks left at my first placement school - I'm going to really miss some of the staff in my department, they're a great laugh and very supportive.

    Not going to miss how challenging it has been though; I definitely couldn't work in a school like that but I can see why others would and I only have positive things to say about how the school works and the majority of kids there.

    I think we find out where we're placed for the second placement this week on Friday. Also find out my first assignment mark either this week or next week.

    I think the biggest areas I can improve on for the second placement are timing and differentiation. Behaviour can always be improved as you get to know your classes and I don't feel like any of my classes have ever been out of control.

    Going to really try and nail differentiation during these final 3 weeks and then through my second placement. Also need to tick a lot of extra curricular standards off at my second placement as I haven't had a chance to go to a parents evening during this one or on a school trip.
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    (Original post by CTVicky)
    I've been goven a Notice of Serious Concern.
    As said above I'm sure you can get through it. Remember, cause for concerns exist to be able to identify those trainees who need extra help with something at the moment. It's a 'make sure no-one slips through and fails' thing rather than a 'you're failing' thing!

    What are the areas you need to work on?

    xxx
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    (Original post by TraineeLynsey)
    Sunflowers - I'm sorry you're having a hard time and I'm glad you took Shelly's advice and shared your problems. I think you'll find most of them are standard PGCE issues that every one of us will be feeling at one time or another.

    I hope you don't take what I'm about to type as a dismissal or anything, because it's not intended that way at all, but I think maybe you need some objectivity. Take a step back, a deep breath and just consider the following:

    No, don't worry, I understand what you're saying.

    Yes, I expect you will be working late and getting up early. I've been getting up at between 4.30am and 5am, getting to work for 7am on the dot, and working solidly through to 6pm, as well as often doing an hour or so at night when I get home (not to mention ALL weekend). I've even gone so far as too book into a hotel nearer school (my commute is 40 mins in the morning and almost an hour at night) so I can get more work done this week! I'm literally sitting in a Premier Inn as I type this

    I think I'm looking at having to do extra at night or in the morning as a bad thing, but it would probably help. I don't want to be too stressed out and functioning on coffee!

    It's exhausting, and it's certainly not sustainable, but the PGCE year is notoriously difficult. You just have to get through each half term (or each week, or each day!) one step at a time and give yourself a huge pat on the back each half term.

    This is good advice. Since I don't get half terms, I'm making sure I give myself little rewards at the end of each week. Just something like going for chocolate and churros.

    The thing is, all teachers work long hours, so if this isn't something you are willing/able to maintain long term, then you might need to do some serious thinking. I believe 50-60 hours a week is the norm even for experienced teachers.

    On my bad days, I feel very lost as to where I'm going, but then on an alright day I'll wonder what I was thinking that for.

    Welcome to teaching. I doubt you will ever find a class where all children will work well without some.... nudging, shall we say! I'm in Y5 and there's one boy who (despite being very bright) simply cannot write more than one sentence without a teacher hovering over him. I've been taking literacy for 2 weeks and every lunch time he has to stay in for an extra half hour to actually get more than 5 words on the page. It's driving me batty, but he needs his education as much as everyone else so I'm persevering. Today I've started moving him to a separate table and told him I'll keep doing so until he can get on. Today he only need 15 minutes at lunch time to finish, so perhaps we're having a breakthrough. That's on top of 3 very low ability chn who need 100% of the TA's time to get anything done, 3 more quite low ability who need a lot of guidence, 1 with behaviour issues and another 20 or so who, for the most part, seem to want confirmation that every single thing they think of is correct before they'll put it down on paper. It's exhausting, but that's what the job it. We're only learning but we'll surely develop strategies to deal with these situations, but to expect a class (any class - EYFS or A level) to work completely without any assistance throughout the lesson is, I would say, quite unreasonable.

    Sometimes I realise it's my fault that I haven't explained the activity properly. Now I usually do the activity on the board with them for the first two or three sentences or questions. One of the activities last week was ordering words in a sentence. I didn't do it then, but I'm going to look at it on Tuesday. I need to think of the best way to do it. At the moment, I'm leaning towards making cards with the individual words on and sticking them on the board. I'll ask them to identify the verb, subject, object and time phrase. Do you think this would word with primary 5?


    Not to be rude, but exactly when else were you expecting to be able to do marking and preparation? If you were under the impression that teachers have the luxury of introducing a topic, setting a task and then sitting there getting on with various jobs while the class just does works perfectly and silently for the next 40 minutes, then I think perhaps your thinking was a tad misguided.

    My marking is done at lunch (when I'm not handholding the affore-mentioned irritatingly lazy child!) and after school, or sometimes before school if I just can't bring myself to do it at night! My preparation is done during my one afternoon of PPA and the weekend, as is the preparation of every other teacher I know.



    Sorry I'm not sure what ESL stands for and can't comment on Y8, but I've certainly had some unruly classes to deal with. Have you asked for help with behaviour strategies, perhaps from some teachers who also have this specific group of children? There could be some little tricks that work with this class that you haven't tried yet.

    ESL is English as a second language. My student's native language is Spanish. I've talked to a colleague about it and she gave me some help. The strange thing is that I seem to have won round the other Year 8 group who were giving me problems.


    You say you 'have' to use the textbook. Is that because the school makes you, or is it mainly because, as you say, you don't have time/energy to find anything else? If the former, that's a shame, but perhaps you can try to liven it up with your delivery of the lessons? If it's the latter, then I really can't suggest anything other than a can of red bull and a bit of perseverance!

    Both really. I have another book of the same level that I prefer, so I try to use bits from that. I've started building up a bank of resources to supplement the book.


    That's life, unfortunately. The report card is intended to inform parents of a child's performance, not supposed to solve their behaviour problems. Behaviour management is HARD (it's my 2nd biggest issue, behind timings in lessons - oh how wonderful it would be to have time for a proper plenary!!). Read some books, practice changing your tone of voice, use your eyes, follow the school's behaviour policy to the letter. If you can take minutes off of their break times, do that (I had the entire class in this break time to prove they could sit quietly after a particularly fussy afternoon yesterday). There are so many tools for behaviour management, but it is hard getting to grips with them and figuring out which ones work with which children/groups of children.

    Could you recommend any good books on behaviour. Would Sue Cowley's book Getting the buggers to behave be useful?

    I'm honestly not making light of this, truly I'm not, because I spent 6 weeks on the edge of tears on placement in the Autumn term, but.... this is genuinely par for the course as far as your PGCE year goes. I mentioned your post to an NQT at work today and his responses were much like mine, especially regarding this last point. My uni asked us in December to put up our hands if we had not cried since the course started. Not a single hand went up. That was a cohort of 50 or so, with ages from about 23 - 50. Every single one of us had cried. The relief in the room when we all realised we were in it together was palpable.

    Part of me is scared to admit I'm having trouble and finding it hard. My colleague recognises this though and tries to get me to open up ( even if it is over a glass of wine on a Friday night).

    I really hope you take all of this in the manner it's intended - i'm not trying to be mean, I'm just giving an impartial outside view to try and help you get a bit of perspective.

    I really hope you start to feel better soon, but if not you MUST go and seek help elsewhere - family, friends, university tutors, your GP...

    You seem quite down based on your recent posts (I'm so glad you've finally opened up about what's been bothering you), and NOTHING is worth risking your mental health.

    Have a good cry, then stick on a song or tv show or something that always raises your mood and try to bring yourself around.

    I promise there is a light at the end of the tunnel.
    Thank you very much for taking the time to reply. I've made a mistake and replied underneath each paragraph and that's why it shows up as a quote.


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    Thanks for the support guys. I know I need help to be outstanding but I don't think I deserve a NOSC. I feel I'm being picked on. I was observed twice in 2 weeks before being given this. It's been shown to several tutors as well as several teachers at the school. The things I'm being NOSCed for are trumped up, the sorts of things FQTs could improve on, like better organised paperwork, better use of assessment. They make it seem like I've been skiving or sitting there every day doing nothing and going home and letting my folder rot and using my PPA time to play Candy Crush. The things I'm being NOSCed for I have not been warned about before. It's all new to me. Sorry if I sound bitter but I work very hard and the whole thing has been very embarrassing to me.
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    I'm training for Primary. But are we able to apply for A-Level teaching? I'm not thinking now but later. Really want to reach A-Level History.

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    (Original post by CTVicky)
    Thanks for the support guys. I know I need help to be outstanding but I don't think I deserve a NOSC. I feel I'm being picked on. I was observed twice in 2 weeks before being given this. It's been shown to several tutors as well as several teachers at the school. The things I'm being NOSCed for are trumped up, the sorts of things FQTs could improve on, like better organised paperwork, better use of assessment. They make it seem like I've been skiving or sitting there every day doing nothing and going home and letting my folder rot and using my PPA time to play Candy Crush. The things I'm being NOSCed for I have not been warned about before. It's all new to me. Sorry if I sound bitter but I work very hard and the whole thing has been very embarrassing to me.
    Not bitter. Understandably annoyed.

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    (Original post by CTVicky)
    Thanks for the support guys. I know I need help to be outstanding but I don't think I deserve a NOSC. I feel I'm being picked on. I was observed twice in 2 weeks before being given this. It's been shown to several tutors as well as several teachers at the school. The things I'm being NOSCed for are trumped up, the sorts of things FQTs could improve on, like better organised paperwork, better use of assessment. They make it seem like I've been skiving or sitting there every day doing nothing and going home and letting my folder rot and using my PPA time to play Candy Crush. The things I'm being NOSCed for I have not been warned about before. It's all new to me. Sorry if I sound bitter but I work very hard and the whole thing has been very embarrassing to me.
    I definitely think this is something you should pursue. You shouldn't be able to be put on a NOSC for something which hasn't already been raised more than once before. It should have been brought up in observation feedback and general conversation, then the uni should have worked with you to get an action plan in place to improve in those areas. If you then didn't improve that might be a NOSC.

    Speak to someone else - a higher or different tutor at uni, or someone outside of the course if needed (like dean of students office).

    (Original post by qwerty_mad)
    I'm training for Primary. But are we able to apply for A-Level teaching? I'm not thinking now but later. Really want to reach A-Level History.

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    Legally QTS covers up to age 18. How likely you'd be to get a job teaching A-level is another matter! It's not unheard of for teachers to switch age ranges, especially after several years of experience, but A-level is very popular for teachers and obviously it's not what you're qualified in. I'd imagine that you'd at least need a good bit of secondary experience to show you can teach to that kind of age range before moving on to A-level purely.

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    Thanks kpw. I've spoken to family and some teacher friends and I've written down how I feel and getting the student union on to it. Cant hack the thought of another ob though. That'd be the third in 3 weeks, this one with added pressure. Feel like I need a holiday!
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    Who is observing you Vicky? I get observed once a week by either my mentor or another teacher in the department. That is the requirement for our Uni though. Are you getting observed because that's what normally happens or because procedures have been put into place?
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    Had an amazing lesson today that was being observed. Kids were engaged, had excellent written and verbal answers. But my feedback (it was observed) totally didnt show that - she focused on all negatives (relating to context, starter should have been 5 mins shorter) and never once praised on the fact the kids learnt a new skill and used it well!

    Overall I got a 3 out of 6 but it's not the grade that's annoying me, it's the fact that when I thought te lesson went really well. It actually was rubbish!
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    (Original post by bethanyrae)
    Had an amazing lesson today that was being observed. Kids were engaged, had excellent written and verbal answers. But my feedback (it was observed) totally didnt show that - she focused on all negatives (relating to context, starter should have been 5 mins shorter) and never once praised on the fact the kids learnt a new skill and used it well!

    Overall I got a 3 out of 6 but it's not the grade that's annoying me, it's the fact that when I thought te lesson went really well. It actually was rubbish!

    It doesn't sound like it actually was rubbish. It seems more of a mismatch with what the observer wants in lesson feedback vs. what you expect. It seems the observer is using the feedback form to record areas that you need to improve only, whereas you are expecting it to also show evidence of meeting certain good points.

    What is the observation MEANT to be for according to your uni. If it's for identifying next steps then there isn't much of an issue, I'd just perhaps speak to them informally to confirm they agree that you did well on the parts you feel you did. If it is also meant to be evidence for good points I'd probably raise it with another tutor. Also, write down the things you think you did well along with precise examples (e.g. write down an example of a child being engaged or where they showed learning, copy evidence from books etc), just in case you should need them. Basically write a reflection of the lesson. It's probably worth noting areas you think could be improved as well to show you're not just being defensive!

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    Had a great lesson today with my year 8 which was observed by my mentor. Probably my best lesson so far on my PGCE; crucially I think I got behaviour right from the start and used rewards and sanctions perfectly to set the mood. Progress was made verbally and in books by every single pupil. It wasn't outstanding but it was very good and it was a 40 minute lesson so I'm even more pleased! Feels so good after a tough 2 weeks of my confidence being knocked.

    2 more observations to go on this placement.
 
 
 
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