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    (Original post by lekky)
    My Uni has like, language courses in french etc, think I remember seeing they had BSL. they're free. have a look!
    Free is always good. Maybe wait until next year so I don't hit exam season, though.

    (Original post by Jessaay!)
    :wavey:
    Good luck Jess!:hugs:
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    (Original post by dooodles)
    hey, can somebody help me!
    im a first year, and am very very stuck with one part of an assignment.

    basically its a case of a guy who has fractured his leg, and we have been given some blood gases to analyse. The blood gases are quite low, but the issue im having is that the guy is at a hospital at 3300m when these gases are taken, so how do I find out if these gases are normal for this altitude or not?

    I have tried looking on the internet for blood gas values for different altitudes but have found nothing.. is there an equation I can use such as the alveolar gas equation?

    thanks v much in advance!
    You just need to talk about chemoreceptors ( central and peripheral) , decreased 02 at altitude, hypoxic hyperventilation, respiratory alkalosis then maybe finish off with acclimatization?
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    How's St Peters going?
    Really well actually. I think it's a really good firm to have right before exams. It's busy if you want it to be, but slow enough that all the docs like to do loads of teaching. There are scheduled formal teaching sessions almost every day, plus lots of informal teaching if you ask the HOs. All of our consultants (resp) do teaching ward rounds too, and give us topics to read about and discuss later.

    We get Wednesdays off completely if we want, since it's so out of London and we're supposed to have sports in the afternoon. But we can go in if we want. Most of the teaching stuff is done by 3 or 4, and you can leave then if you want, but we try to clerk a patient and present to the docs when possible.

    The area is crap for convenience though. You have to drive if you want to go anywhere. The hospital food is not that cheap or nice. There are days with free sandwiches though, not just on grand round days. I drive, and don't live in London, so it's not so bad. Commuting on public transport from London is really not pleasant. For me, the slowest days take about an hour to drive through peak time on the M25. If I can miss the traffic, it only takes me about 35-45 minutes tops.
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    Some lowlife mother****er stole my identity and got a phone contract out in my name IN STORE last week. ****er.
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    (Original post by visesh)
    Some lowlife mother****er stole my identity and got a phone contract out in my name IN STORE last week. ****er.
    Somebody did that to my brother and he got a blackberry sent to our house :confused: Took Orange ages to get it sorted out....
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    Somebody did that to my brother and he got a blackberry sent to our house :confused: Took Orange ages to get it sorted out....
    Your Brother: "What blackberry?"

    lol
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    Thankfully you're more lad than realist
    :p:
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    (Original post by dooodles)
    hey, can somebody help me!
    im a first year, and am very very stuck with one part of an assignment.

    basically its a case of a guy who has fractured his leg, and we have been given some blood gases to analyse. The blood gases are quite low, but the issue im having is that the guy is at a hospital at 3300m when these gases are taken, so how do I find out if these gases are normal for this altitude or not?

    I have tried looking on the internet for blood gas values for different altitudes but have found nothing.. is there an equation I can use such as the alveolar gas equation?

    thanks v much in advance!
    Hiya, had to look this one up. Obviously as you go higher, the partial pressures of gases fall as atmospheric pressure falls. This is in american digits so bear with me.

    Arterial PO2 is normally 100mg Hg.

    According to this website http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/ai...ure-d_462.html 3500 metres atmospheric pressure is 500 mmHg. This is 65% of normal sea level pressure of 760mmHg.

    Alveolar and pulmonary capillary and therefore systemic blood equilibrates and I am presuming that alveolar partial pressures fall proportionally to atmospheric. Therefore all values will be 65% of normal.

    Giving a PO2 at this altitude of 65mmHg or 8.6 kPa.

    This is deduction and not guaranteed!
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    I think my problem is that I'm just inherently lazy?
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    (Original post by visesh)
    Some lowlife mother****er stole my identity and got a phone contract out in my name IN STORE last week. ****er.
    thats pretty messed up. I thought you had to have photo ID to do that!
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    Hiya, had to look this one up. Obviously as you go higher, the partial pressures of gases fall as atmospheric pressure falls. This is in american digits so bear with me.

    Arterial PO2 is normally 100mg Hg.

    According to this website http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/ai...ure-d_462.html 3500 metres atmospheric pressure is 500 mmHg. This is 65% of normal sea level pressure of 760mmHg.

    Alveolar and pulmonary capillary and therefore systemic blood equilibrates and I am presuming that alveolar partial pressures fall proportionally to atmospheric. Therefore all values will be 65% of normal.

    Giving a PO2 at this altitude of 65mmHg or 8.6 kPa.

    This is deduction and not guaranteed!

    Thats really complicated. Call me lazy, but I would just say - but him on a known concentration, say 24%, do an abg and you have something more familier to work with.

    OP, remember that the adaptations to height will change ESR and hb...
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    My mate scanned in the picture of my drunken SAQs if anybodies interested in seeing them minus my name.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    Hiya, had to look this one up. Obviously as you go higher, the partial pressures of gases fall as atmospheric pressure falls. This is in american digits so bear with me.

    Arterial PO2 is normally 100mg Hg.

    According to this website http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/ai...ure-d_462.html 3500 metres atmospheric pressure is 500 mmHg. This is 65% of normal sea level pressure of 760mmHg.

    Alveolar and pulmonary capillary and therefore systemic blood equilibrates and I am presuming that alveolar partial pressures fall proportionally to atmospheric. Therefore all values will be 65% of normal.

    Giving a PO2 at this altitude of 65mmHg or 8.6 kPa.

    This is deduction and not guaranteed!
    hmm its all seems a bit complex being as we have never learnt any of this, and the assignment is suppose to be linking to the course...

    the question is 'describe the physiological mechanisms behind the blood gases', so maybe I dont actually need to interpret them in such depth! (hopefully). thanks for the help
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    My mate scanned in the picture of my drunken SAQs if anybodies interested in seeing them minus my name.
    post it man :p:
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    Do it!
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    It looks worse every time I see it.
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    Loving the weather right now - first bbq of the year this weekend!

    Anyone else having problems with the page, as in the individual boxes keep shuffling up and down; really irritating.
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    (Original post by JordanCarroll)
    Oh I know what it means, just yes, the luxury! Students hiring cleaners!
    Cleaners is the reason I live in halls.
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    (Original post by lekky)
    Haha! I've not seen any nekkid bodies in a medical student capacity, however, I'd probably not even notice if I did for the amount I've seen as a carer (from my experience with that, yes it does go).
    .
    Patient: "NURSE! Could you have a look at my bottom. I think there's something wrong with it. I can't go."
    Me: "I'm not a nurse."
    Patient: "Could you look at it anyway?"



    I politely declined and ran to get a nurse, who also declined to look at it.
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    (Original post by Mushi_master)
    So now friends from back home are getting married and having babies? I so should not be broody as a second year!
    I know med students who are getting engaged. Feels so weird.


    (Original post by visesh)
    Some lowlife mother****er stole my identity and got a phone contract out in my name IN STORE last week. ****er.
    That's ****ed up.

    On another note: I am disappointed I will miss yet another London Medics Meet. Damn you, Scotland! No actually, I really like Scotland, what with having free prescriptions and all. We need to save our money for important things. Like booze.
 
 
 
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