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    (Original post by TremelliusScrofa)
    Hi there, this question may sound foolish, but do you know if the ten mile is a ten mile radius as opposed to actual journey length? For example my house is within a ten mile radius but is around eleven miles to actually drive (it is only 9.8 miles to actually drive to the college but more to the market square). Presumably this is acceptable?
    It's always been spoken of as a radius, not road miles. I'd just say pointedly at some point 'It's a good job my [village] is just within 10 miles!' and move the conversation on. As I say, with the increase in the number of mature students and the realisation that part timers can't 'keep term' (they used to have a similar regulation for their residential sessions) they do seem to be relaxing the interpretation. However, it remains in the statutes as a clearly definitive requirement to getting a degree.
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    (Original post by paperdoorway)
    ..............
    You'll have to go through the process and hope you have a sympathetic Supervisor and College. Unless you are claiming research requirements, the rule holds good for PhD students as much as Masters. The university might point out that they provide the resources for study and you are paying for them, also the nature of professional development and networking means the environment and the opportunities provided when you live within a few minutes of the city centre is beneficial to your academic development. College will need to know where you are living, if it isn't in their accommodation.
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    You'll have to go through the process and hope you have a sympathetic Supervisor and College. Unless you are claiming research requirements, the rule holds good for PhD students as much as Masters. The university might point out that they provide the resources for study and you are paying for them, also the nature of professional development and networking means the environment and the opportunities provided when you live within a few minutes of the city centre is beneficial to your academic development. College will need to know where you are living, if it isn't in their accommodation.
    Thanks, threeportdrift. It's quite frustrating to know that this rule even exists since as a mature student, there's so many other obligations and living in London would make my life very easy.

    I read somewhere that if you were an undergrad at Cambridge and now a postgrad you've already fulfilled residency requirements so the rule doesnt apply. Does that also count for someone who did an MPhil at Cambridge and lived in town, but now doing PhD and wants to live outside?
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    (Original post by paperdoorway)
    Thanks, threeportdrift. It's quite frustrating to know that this rule even exists since as a mature student, there's so many other obligations and living in London would make my life very easy.

    I read somewhere that if you were an undergrad at Cambridge and now a postgrad you've already fulfilled residency requirements so the rule doesnt apply. Does that also count for someone who did an MPhil at Cambridge and lived in town, but now doing PhD and wants to live outside?
    When I completed my Cambridge MPhil and started the PhD, and received the usual info pack from my College, it was stated that I needed to live within 10 miles of Great St Mary's. I don't think I've ever heard of an exception like you mention, since each degree is a self-contained thing with its own requirements; the residency requirement just happens to be a common one to all degrees (apart from a few exceptions like part-time etc.). Each term I get sent a 'Confirmation of Residency' form from my college, to certify (since they think I'm living in Cam) that I've been in Cambridge for the minimum number of days, and it's always written across the top that graduate students must live within 10 miles. Though threeportdrift may have a better idea of how it works

    As regards whether you could live in London or not, I think it could be possible, depending on your supervisor and your research. The couple of people I knew who lived in London during the PhD mostly argued that they really needed to be there for research (I'm a historian, so most of them argued that they needed to use the British Library or a similar archive very intensively, and so going up & back to Cambridge every day on the train would be ridiculous and expensive). I think if you could phrase it like that, it would be more persuasive. I don't think (though again, this is dependent on individual supervisors & colleges) they'd be as flexible if you merely wanted to live there because it's more lively/interesting, or because your family was there, etc. So if you can find a compelling research reason, it might make your case easier.
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    FWIW, I know someone currently applying for doctoral work and while he may move his family to Cambridge, they were actually sort of mellow about his continuing to live in London. It really comes down to your supervisor, your college tutor, and whoever they have to face down in the administration.

    Oxford is much the same, and his potential supervisor let it be known that there would be no problem with a London residence. Again, though-- there was some personal familiarity before that conversation was started.

    If you take a look at the training schedule for many of the doctoral programs, there are often weekly things at the university that you really should get to, but otherwise it's a lot of reading and combing through libraries.
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    (Original post by paperdoorway)
    I read somewhere that if you were an undergrad at Cambridge and now a postgrad you've already fulfilled residency requirements so the rule doesnt apply. Does that also count for someone who did an MPhil at Cambridge and lived in town, but now doing PhD and wants to live outside?
    I don't read anything like that in the link I pasted earlier.

    Or read this link, page 176 para 4 and others around there and see if there is anything that exempts you

    https://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/univ/so/...rdinance02.pdf
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    Hello everyone, I applied for MPhil in Genomics Medicine in Cambridge (Newnham) and they just emailed me requesting a 20 minute phone interview in a couple of weeks to discuss my application (they said I do not need to prepare a presentation). Has anyone else had a phone interview to maybe me give me some directions/tips? I would really appreciate any help as I have not done a phone interview before and I am a little nervous. Thanks!
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    It has been exactly two weeks since I had my interview with a potential supervisor. Still waiting for a result. Very nervous.
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    (Original post by cameondecember)
    It has been exactly two weeks since I had my interview with a potential supervisor. Still waiting for a result. Very nervous.
    It's been exactly a week for me, though both faculty members who interviewed me told me they wouldn't likely be my supervisor upon me asking them.
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    Hi, I was offered a place to study at Cambridge for an MPhil in International Relations and Politics on the condition of receiving a First. However at the moment my average is a really high 2:1/borderline First (16.3/20). Do you think i will get rejected or do I still have a chance of getting accepted given that I have already received an offer and I'm so close to achieving the requirements? (only missed by 0.2 where 16.5 is a First)
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    Hi,

    I was offered a place to study at Cambridge for an MPhil in International Relations and Politics on the condition of receiving a First. However at the moment my average is a really high 2:1/borderline First (16.3/20). Do you think i will get rejected or do I still have a chance of getting accepted given that I have already received an offer and I'm so close to achieving the requirements? (only missed by 0.2 were 16.5 is a First)
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    (Original post by a90)
    Hi,

    I was offered a place to study at Cambridge for an MPhil in International Relations and Politics on the condition of receiving a First. However at the moment my average is a really high 2:1/borderline First (16.3/20). Do you think i will get rejected or do I still have a chance of getting accepted given that I have already received an offer and I'm so close to achieving the requirements? (only missed by 0.2 were 16.5 is a First)
    From the 'your offer and its conditions':

    'If you do not achieve the grade required in your academic condition please still provide us with an original or certified copy of your final transcript/certificate. We will ask your department to consider your final results and they will make a recommendation to the Graduate Admissions Office (Board of Graduate Studies)'

    I would speculate that the decision would be affected by how close you were to fulfilling the condition, how strong other aspects of your application were such as your research proposal, and also how much space is available on the course after those that meet conditions have confirmed their place. From the information provided it seems that if their is room on the course it is plausible they may consider you anyway, however I can't offer anything in the way of statistics or anecdotal examples I'm afraid.

    Good luck anyway!
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    (Original post by a90)
    Hi,

    I was offered a place to study at Cambridge for an MPhil in International Relations and Politics on the condition of receiving a First. However at the moment my average is a really high 2:1/borderline First (16.3/20). Do you think i will get rejected or do I still have a chance of getting accepted given that I have already received an offer and I'm so close to achieving the requirements? (only missed by 0.2 were 16.5 is a First)
    Which university do you go to in Scotland?
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    (Original post by TremelliusScrofa)
    From the 'your offer and its conditions':

    'If you do not achieve the grade required in your academic condition please still provide us with an original or certified copy of your final transcript/certificate. We will ask your department to consider your final results and they will make a recommendation to the Graduate Admissions Office (Board of Graduate Studies)'

    I would speculate that the decision would be affected by how close you were to fulfilling the condition, how strong other aspects of your application were such as your research proposal, and also how much space is available on the course after those that meet conditions have confirmed their place. From the information provided it seems that if their is room on the course it is plausible they may consider you anyway, however I can't offer anything in the way of statistics or anecdotal examples I'm afraid.

    Good luck anyway!
    Thanks for the clarification, I hope it all works out in the end! It sucks that I'm only 0.2 points away from a First!
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    (Original post by tsukurutazaki)
    Which university do you go to in Scotland?
    Thats for me to know and you to find out
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    (Original post by sat0ri)
    Oh wow - life must be great for you right now unfortunately, I'm still waiting on internal funding from Cambridge, which I am not expecting to get. I do have an offer at Oxford with a modest amount of money (about half of all expenses), so it's looking like that's where I'm ending up. I lucked out being offered spots at very nice colleges at both schools (I'm actually suspicious they do this on purpose so we, as "internationals", are more likely to plunk down the significantly higher tuition fees), so overall I think it's an opportunity I can't pass up -- I just wish the decision was made easier with a full scholarship. I'm very excited to experience the UK culture

    EDIT - I'm not expecting the funding because, after creeping through the people offered the scholarships, I see most of the recipients are absolute monsters (from Stanford, Harvard, great pubs, etc)
    Oh I wish it was. The committee that awards the scholarships was due to make a decision a week ago and they have once again delayed their meeting for another week. At this point I am so exhausted and I feel like I should be awarded a degree just for going through the whole application and scholarship process. It's been 7 months since I applied and I feel like this is a never-ending process.
    No need to mention that the Ministry of Education rejected me the first time I applied for a funny reason - apparently they thought the MPhil degree wasn't a Master's degree. Had to reapply once again with a confirmation from Cambridge that the course is indeed a Master's degree course. All in all, my lesson from this whole experience is to be very persistent. I do understand your disappointment with the tuition fees being enormous for internationals, since I too am unable to pay the amount if not offered a scholarship. And I really feel your pain of being unable to take attend yet being admitted to the two best universities in the UK. It's a horrible feeling.

    However, there are still scholarships from the Trust, yet to be announced, but from what I've seen from the previous years, they only cover a tuition fee or part of it for MPhil applicants. Are you going to be able to cover the rest of your fees at Oxford?
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    (Original post by a90)
    Thats for me to know and you to find out
    Fair enough, just thought we might know each other if you're doing IR.
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    So I've been under consideration by the Degree Committee for a month now with no interview. I thought that interviews usually happen before the department passes the application on to the degree committee so I'm wondering should I perhaps contact them about this?
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    (Original post by 0renda)
    So I've been under consideration by the Degree Committee for a month now with no interview. I thought that interviews usually happen before the department passes the application on to the degree committee so I'm wondering should I perhaps contact them about this?
    Hey which department have you applied at? My so far experience with Cambridge is that it usually takes them about exactly a month to reply positivekly for interview... If your course does not require interview it may be longer...But froom a general understanding of what I have been reading, generally waiting is a good sign for Cambridge, as the decision approval takes a long time, whereas the rejections are pretty fast. (it is also on their website) Anyway my experience is mainly for Medicine and Health sciences department interviews as I have been through both so they arrive within a month almost precisely for interview, but ofc it differs based on department
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    (Original post by 0renda)
    ..............
    Does your course interview everyone? Not all do, and you would usually be interviewed before the Degree Committee stage, so your situation doesn't seem strange.
 
 
 

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