Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Got my new timetable today.. Really happy with it!

    Got two year 7's, 2 year 8's, one year 9 and one year 10. One of my y7 groups is the very bottom set - a nurture group. It's going to be a challenge but they are all lovely so will be ok. Will be doing controlled assessment with the year 10 lot which is a daunting thought!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by outlaw-torn)
    Got my new timetable today.. Really happy with it!

    Got two year 7's, 2 year 8's, one year 9 and one year 10. One of my y7 groups is the very bottom set - a nurture group. It's going to be a challenge but they are all lovely so will be ok. Will be doing controlled assessment with the year 10 lot which is a daunting thought!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Nice.

    Doing CAs is scary/feels like a lot of responsibility, but it's so good that you're getting the chance to do it now. I'm an NQT and am finding GCSE assessment really nerve wracking because I never had the opportunity to grade speaking and writing during the PGCE.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Steveluis10)
    Had a great lesson today with my year 8 which was observed by my mentor. Probably my best lesson so far on my PGCE; crucially I think I got behaviour right from the start and used rewards and sanctions perfectly to set the mood. Progress was made verbally and in books by every single pupil. It wasn't outstanding but it was very good and it was a 40 minute lesson so I'm even more pleased! Feels so good after a tough 2 weeks of my confidence being knocked.

    2 more observations to go on this placement.
    Congrats on a good obs You deserve it!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Has any taught 15 lessons a week yet?

    I have successfully completed my first placement and I am worried about teaching 15+ lessons. I just about managed with 10 lessons and hardly had anytime to spare as I always had something to do. I am in secondary.




    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by pgce2013)
    Has any taught 15 lessons a week yet?

    I have successfully completed my first placement and I am worried about teaching 15+ lessons. I just about managed with 10 lessons and hardly had anytime to spare as I always had something to do. I am in secondary.




    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I teach 24. It's hard. I have no life.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    I teach 24. It's hard. I have no life.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Oh my that is an awful lot of lessons. Are you an NQT?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by pgce2013)
    Oh my that is an awful lot of lessons. Are you an NQT?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Not exactly. I'm teaching English to Spanish students but I haven't had proper training

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by pgce2013)
    Has any taught 15 lessons a week yet?

    I have successfully completed my first placement and I am worried about teaching 15+ lessons. I just about managed with 10 lessons and hardly had anytime to spare as I always had something to do. I am in secondary.




    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Don't panic too much about it. The uni will generally decide on the number required based on your increasing skill. So although 10 has seemed like a lot, as you're getting better 15 won't seem like as much more... it would probably be more like having done 11 or 12 on your first placement... does that make any sense at all lol?

    xxx
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kpwxx)
    Don't panic too much about it. The uni will generally decide on the number required based on your increasing skill. So although 10 has seemed like a lot, as you're getting better 15 won't seem like as much more... it would probably be more like having done 11 or 12 on your first placement... does that make any sense at all lol?

    xxx
    Yep, I had a really tough time at my first placement and I am just panicking I was placed in a challenging school and this time they have done the same. Not only that, we have to look for a job while on this placement.

    However, I do think it should be ok as I will be doing the same amount of lesson plans but just repeating the lessons to various classes. We have to stay positive 😁

    At the moment I am just thinking there are not enough hours in the day.

    Some tips for others:

    Know your schools behaviour policy and do not be afraid to follow sanctions through, the first few weeks are the toughest as you are establishing your ground.

    You need to take a different approach to each class and adapt accordingly.

    Have a tracker sheet

    Less of you and more of the pupils

    Organisation is the key

    Be clever with your marking as you all may be aware we could spend a very long time marking







    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    I teach 24. It's hard. I have no life.
    How do you even fit 24 lessons into a week? Our total timetable is only 20 lessons!

    (Original post by pgce2013)
    Has any taught 15 lessons a week yet?

    I have successfully completed my first placement and I am worried about teaching 15+ lessons. I just about managed with 10 lessons and hardly had anytime to spare as I always had something to do. I am in secondary.
    I tend to do 14 hour-long lessons a week and it's primary, so no repetition possible! It's tough, but it really is true what they say - you do get quicker!

    Also depends on how supportive your colleagues are. My class teacher is brilliant and gives me advice about what jobs can wait when she knows I'm really busy.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TraineeLynsey)
    How do you even fit 24 lessons into a week? Our total timetable is only 20 lessons!



    I tend to do 14 hour-long lessons a week and it's primary, so no repetition possible! It's tough, but it really is true what they say - you do get quicker!

    Also depends on how supportive your colleagues are. My class teacher is brilliant and gives me advice about what jobs can wait when she knows I'm really busy.
    Then it is doable, I was of the impression primary was much easier but I'm wrong.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by pgce2013)
    Then it is doable, I was of the impression primary was much easier but I'm wrong.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    It's really about the individual. I teach early years, and find older children harder- can't even imagine trying secondary!!! But that's the kind of person I am. I don't did teaching early years "easy" but I feel it flows more and is more fun! But some other teachers would find it much harder to move down here as the time spent perfecting the environment is so high and you have to be so personalised to the individual child. It's about the teacher's strengths.

    Xxx

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    In many secondary schools, lessons are 50 minutes, so pupils have 30 lessons per week.

    As an NQT, I teach 24 lessons, but next year I'll have 27. Aargh!

    It is the case that some lessons can be reused, but it doesn't happen as much as I'd like.

    I have 2 Year 7 classes, and I do reuse lessons for them (just swapping things around a bit depending on how the last lesson went as one group is starting to pull ahead of the other a bit...), but in the other year groups this isn't possible because my classes are setted.

    In Y8, I teach Set 1 and Set 4. In Y9 I teach beginners Spanish, bottom set French, and a bit of top set French. In Y10 I teach top set GCSE and bottom set Foundation Certificate, so the gap is huge and I can hardly ever reuse anything even where groups are doing the same topics.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I've only really been doing 6-8 lessons a week on my first placement (secondary) but feel like I could do a bit more. It's quite a challenging school so every class takes a lot out of me in terms of controlling behaviour and delivering teaching. I've never been too behind in work though, always have my lessons planned usually a couple of days in advance.

    I know lots of people on my course who have been teaching about 12-15 lessons though so it does vary.

    2 weeks to go anyway! Crazy to think this first placement is nearly over. I've grown to really love my school and the staff but stand by the fact that I wouldn't want to work there - it's too challenging and demanding.

    Congratulations to everyone who is nearly at half term, half way through!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Also in terms of job applications should I be worried that nothing has come up where I live yet? A few on my course have started applying and have had interviews but they're prepared to travel a bit. Should I hold fire or start applying for jobs on the outskirts of where I live if they come up?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by myrtille)
    In many secondary schools, lessons are 50 minutes, so pupils have 30 lessons per week.

    As an NQT, I teach 24 lessons, but next year I'll have 27. Aargh!

    It is the case that some lessons can be reused, but it doesn't happen as much as I'd like.

    I have 2 Year 7 classes, and I do reuse lessons for them (just swapping things around a bit depending on how the last lesson went as one group is starting to pull ahead of the other a bit...), but in the other year groups this isn't possible because my classes are setted.

    In Y8, I teach Set 1 and Set 4. In Y9 I teach beginners Spanish, bottom set French, and a bit of top set French. In Y10 I teach top set GCSE and bottom set Foundation Certificate, so the gap is huge and I can hardly ever reuse anything even where groups are doing the same topics.
    Hi

    I'd imagine you've experienced some of the things I'm currently having difficulty with. How do you keep a bottom set interested?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Steveluis10)
    Also in terms of job applications should I be worried that nothing has come up where I live yet? A few on my course have started applying and have had interviews but they're prepared to travel a bit. Should I hold fire or start applying for jobs on the outskirts of where I live if they come up?
    It just depends on your subject and if you can manage the travel. I'm holding fire yet as but will start applying soon. I've been told more will come up later but at the moment nothing is suitable. You may have to travel if you want the right school.

    I'm willing to relocate but I want a school that fits with me so I can give it my all and enjoy my NQT.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I can manage to travel but not too far for the NQT year.

    I just don't see the point in applying to the few positions that are a bit inconvenient now when schools much closer might come up in a few weeks time.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    Hi

    I'd imagine you've experienced some of the things I'm currently having difficulty with. How do you keep a bottom set interested?
    I would say with my bottom set Year 8 group I focus more on enforcing discipline than on keeping them interested, and this is the case with other teachers in my school too as the whole Year 8 cohort is very badly behaved (I've heard the word "feral" used to describe them on many occasions...).

    At the start of the lesson I just focus on behaviour. Lining them up outside until they are behaving appropriately to come into the classroom (one class spent about 5 minutes standing in the rain yesterday - their choice as if they'd been silent they could have come in!), sending them back out and lining up again if necessary. Issuing warnings and detentions for those who repeatedy talk when I'm talking.

    For the rest of the lesson, I'd say the key is to try and have a settle/stir/settle/stir pattern of activities. So you do something calming to quiet them down, then do something a bit more fun, then something else calming.

    Settling starter ideas - crosswords/wordsearches/cryptograms/spot the odd one out. You can make free puzzles really easily using this site: http://www.discoveryeducation.com/fr...TOKEN=35384518
    I also do true/false with pictures quite a bit - for example, I've just been doing clothing and colours with my Y8s, so on my powerpoint I put a load of pictures, labelled with "a pink skirt", "black shoes", "a blue jacket" etc. and they had to compare them to the pictures and check that the item vocab and the colour were correct.
    Anagrams to revise basic vocab from the previous lesson.
    Put the sentence in order (full words, but jumble them up - with bottom set I normally keep the capital letters and full stops to give them a clue!)

    Stirrers
    For getting them more involved and doing a bit of speaking/listening, I short vocab games. Stuff like slapboard (1 boy and 1 girl up at the board, pictures on the board, I say the French word and they race to hit it), noughts and crosses (pictures in squares, they have to say the correct word/phrase to claim the square for their team) or give/keep the points (English phrase on the board, they have to translate it then decide whether to give/keep the points - I then reveal points which may be positive or negative).

    The difficulty is then getting them to do other activities sensibly as they can't progress by just remembering basic items of vocabulary!

    Reading activities need to be scaffolded to help them pick out key information. So often I'll give them a text and first ask them to identify and underline all the times in the text, or all the sports, or all the days of the week. Then when they come to answering questions about it, they have already found most of the answers.

    For writing activities, word mats are really helpful. I often present them like flowcharts with arrows so it becomes like an equation to follow - a time phrase from this box, a verb from this box, a place from this box, a connective from this box, an adjective from this box... etc. (On Mondays --> I play football--> at school --> because it's fun). It's about making it achievable for them as they simply don't have the memory capacity to cope with just writing stuff.

    One activity I like to do to prepare for writing is to put them into pairs/threes and give them a word mat and a mini-whiteboard. Then I put a sentence on the board which they need to translate (using the word mat) and the team which holds up the most complete answer at the end of 1 minute gets a point. They enjoy this and get quite competitive, but it also means they know what to do when I then ask them to write sentences of their own using the same word mat.

    I've got some resources (for French and Spanish) on TES (same username) so feel free to have a look and see if there's anything you could adapt for teaching English (but I know some of the approaches are different).
    • TSR Support Team
    • Wiki Support Team
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Steveluis10)
    I can manage to travel but not too far for the NQT year.

    I just don't see the point in applying to the few positions that are a bit inconvenient now when schools much closer might come up in a few weeks time.
    Teachers have until the Easter hold to hand in their notice, so after that the only people who will be able to apply for jobs starting in September will be trainees or ones without permanent jobs already. Many teachers won't have handed in notice yet
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.