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Meathead-jack
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#2921
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#2921
Does anyone know if we get given the species diversity index all of the time in questions???

If you reply can you quote please)
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anonymousecheese
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#2922
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#2922
synodontis batensoda becasue its branched off closer to the Synodontis membranacea
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Simran Mars Foster
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#2923
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#2923
What causes the S shape of the hameoglobn curve?
?God been gone an hour and this thread has gone so fast.
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annaelizabet
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#2924
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#2924
(Original post by PoorLoser)
Mochokus niloticus

HOW? i do not understand, wouldn't it be the one closer to it?
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LiamDaly
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#2925
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#2925
(Original post by LiamDaly)
What are the possible plant 6 mark questions??????

Please


Posted from TSR Mobilehh


This will come up Damm it what are the possible questions please?


Posted from TSR Mobilehh
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Paulineuh
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#2926
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#2926
(Original post by Simran Mars Foster)
What causes the S shape of the hameoglobn curve?
?God been gone an hour and this thread has gone so fast.
The haemoglobin after it absorbs one oxygen, it easily absorbs the last 3 easily, this causes the S.

Correct me if I'm wrong

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Locutus73
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#2927
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#2927
(Original post by Linked)
can someone give me a six marker on meiosis please - with independent segregation and crossing over as well.

Please I am really struggling with this topic and I have a feeling that this is what they are going to ask tomorrow.

Also has anyone done the January 2013 paper - the asthma investigation question was really hard. But does anyone know how the graph should look - please.
Second the meiosis one.
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Magenta96
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#2928
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#2928
(Original post by Linked)
can someone give me a six marker on meiosis please - with independent segregation and crossing over as well.

Please I am really struggling with this topic and I have a feeling that this is what they are going to ask tomorrow.

Also has anyone done the January 2013 paper - the asthma investigation question was really hard. But does anyone know how the graph should look - please.
Meiosis is similar to mitosis almost so basically in prophase the chromosomes will condense and shorten and the spindle fibres form. In metaphase, the chromosomes attach to the spindle and line up at the equator of the cell. Crossing over then occurs so the chromatids all twist around each other, causing bits to break off and alleles to be exchanged.

The independent segregation of chromosomes also occurs in metaphase so the homologous chromosomes line up alongside their partners and shuffle about and separate randomly which means each daughter cell gets a different set of chromosomes ensuring that they're not genetically identical. In anaphase, chromosomes are pulled to opposite poles of the cell unlike in mitosis where chromatids are pulled to opposite poles. Then finally, in telophase, the nuclear envelope reforms around each group of chromosomes and cytokinesis occurs so the cytoplasm divides forming two daughter cells that are different.
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anonymousecheese
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#2929
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#2929
yes the eqation is given in all the questions ive seen
http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...2-QP-JAN12.PDF (q7aii)
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LiamDaly
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#2930
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#2930
(Original post by Locutus73)
Second the meiosis one.


Third the meiosis one and also DAMM PLANT QUESTIONS.


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annaelizabet
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#2931
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#2931
(Original post by anonymousecheese)
synodontis batensoda becasue its branched off closer to the Synodontis membranacea

no it isn't :P it is mochokus nilo thingy, i don't know why!
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JM17
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#2932
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#2932
(Original post by Simran Mars Foster)
What causes the S shape of the hameoglobn curve?
?God been gone an hour and this thread has gone so fast.
When haemoglobin combines with the first o2 molecule, its shape alters in a way that makes it easier for other molecules to join too. But as the haemoglobin starts to become saturated, it gets harder for more oxygen molecules to join. As a result the curve has a steep bit in the middle where it's really easy for oxygen molecules to join, and shallo bits at each end where it's harder. The curve is steep, a small change in pO2 causes a big change in the amount of oxygen carried by the haemoglobin.
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anonymousecheese
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#2933
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#2933
(Original post by LiamDaly)
Third the meiosis one and also DAMM PLANT QUESTIONS.


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OK everyone,
for meiosis im sure you will get the marks if you DRAW IT with labels and explanations (same way you couldve drawn the phagocytosis in unit 1)
...that is what ill be doing
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annaelizabet
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#2934
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#2934
http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...W-QP-JAN11.PDF

3bii
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LiamDaly
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#2935
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#2935
(Original post by LiamDaly)
Third the meiosis one and also DAMM PLANT QUESTIONS.


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Possible plant questions?


Posted from TSR Mobilehh
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JM17
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#2936
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#2936
(Original post by Magenta96)
Meiosis is similar to mitosis almost so basically in prophase the chromosomes will condense and shorten and the spindle fibres form. In metaphase, the chromosomes attach to the spindle and line up at the equator of the cell. Crossing over then occurs so the chromatids all twist around each other, causing bits to break off and alleles to be exchanged.

The independent segregation of chromosomes also occurs in metaphase so the homologous chromosomes line up alongside their partners and shuffle about and separate randomly which means each daughter cell gets a different set of chromosomes ensuring that they're not genetically identical. In anaphase, chromosomes are pulled to opposite poles of the cell unlike in mitosis where chromatids are pulled to opposite poles. Then finally, in telophase, the nuclear envelope reforms around each group of chromosomes and cytokinesis occurs so the cytoplasm divides forming two daughter cells that are different.

Are you reciting a textbook?
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anonymousecheese
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#2937
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#2937
the mohkookus one?
thats all the way at the top!!:rolleyes:
okay tomorrow when you get this question you will chose the one closest to the one they are asking about.
okay
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lorobolorolo
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#2938
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#2938
(Original post by Manni)
Lool may as well to liven up this depressing revision mood
Lool it doesn't liven up ur mood if u don't get a reply from her. Might as well wait until the exams are over and then this depressing mood will be gone
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annaelizabet
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#2939
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#2939
(Original post by anonymousecheese)
the mohkookus one?
thats all the way at the top!!:rolleyes:
okay tomorrow when you get this question you will chose the one closest to the one they are asking about.
okay

http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...W-QP-JAN11.PDF

question 3bii?
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Linked
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#2940
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#2940
(Original post by magenta96)
meiosis is similar to mitosis almost so basically in prophase the chromosomes will condense and shorten and the spindle fibres form. In metaphase, the chromosomes attach to the spindle and line up at the equator of the cell. Crossing over then occurs so the chromatids all twist around each other, causing bits to break off and alleles to be exchanged.

The independent segregation of chromosomes also occurs in metaphase so the homologous chromosomes line up alongside their partners and shuffle about and separate randomly which means each daughter cell gets a different set of chromosomes ensuring that they're not genetically identical. In anaphase, chromosomes are pulled to opposite poles of the cell unlike in mitosis where chromatids are pulled to opposite poles. Then finally, in telophase, the nuclear envelope reforms around each group of chromosomes and cytokinesis occurs so the cytoplasm divides forming two daughter cells that are different.

and so all of this process happens again during meiosis 2 but instead of chromosomes it will be chromatids. I think i finally got it - thank you
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