Oxford Applicants for 2012 Entry Watch

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EdmundB
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(Original post by Everything/Nothing)
Just general questions.
What is the size of the college?
Is it a good place for English?
Is it as beautiful as I've read?
Is it as smug as I've read?
What is the atmosphere-is everyone close?
is it easy to make friends?
How are the drama and poetry societies?
Do you know what the English tutors are like?
How is the accommodation?
-Thank you sincerely for your trouble.
Peace
Numbers-wise, it's one of the larger colleges, with 400 undergraduates and 200 graduates. As regards space, it has the largest grounds of any college (as long as you don't count Christ Church meadow as part of the college...), and can house you in college accomodation for all three or four years which is a major bonus. The farthest away you'll find yourself is just over the river (3 minute walk) in your first year.

I don't do English, but it attracts a strong pool of applicants and, from what I've heard, the English teaching is extremely good. One of the Deans is an English tutor and he seems like great fun!

It's very beautiful - the only 1960s monstrosity is safely hidden over the river where no-one can see it, unlike many colleges that have them in the middle of their buildings (Trinity is a culprit here)

I don't know where you read about Magdalen being smug. There is perhaps a degree of friendly/joking rivalry with some of the other bigger/well-known colleges, especially Christ Church, but there's nothing 'smug' about it. Most people seem to appreciate the fact they're at what is commonly seen as one of the most beautiful (it not the most) colleges in the university. The deer park alone in springtime is a huge bonus. The advantage of its size means there is something - and someone - for everyone. While it is perhaps not as close-knit a community as some of the smaller colleges (places like Lincoln, which are tiny) you'll easily be able to find a group of likeminded people. There's also the advantage of the fact that your youthful indiscretions won't be known by absolutely everyone within five hours. There's the bogsheet to help with that, however...

I found it very easy to make friends. I have a group of people with which I go out most nights. You won't have a problem here, as long as you make the effort in fresher's week just so people know who you are.
Drama seems to be healthy - but it seems like people do this more in collaboration with other colleges rather than as an intra-college thing.

Accomodation is OK in first year - if you're in the High Street houses (as I am) you'll get either a nice big room or a small cupboard. If you're in the 1960s block with most of the first years you'll have a smallish room that is just like everyone else's. Some of the 2nd/3rd year rooms are however some of the nicest in Oxford (the New Building rooms in particular)

(Original post by laughylolly)
I've looked at Magdalen. It looks beautiful, I'm really hoping to visit Oxford this year to see it in person.

What would you say were the best things about the college?
Is there a large variety of different sorts of people?
Are the sports good/what would you say were the main sports played at the college?
Is there anything about the college that has disapointed you?

Thanks
The music, the deer park, and the fact I've yet to meet more than a couple of people with whom I don't get along.
All sorts - clubbers, people who like quiet nights in, union types (although not too many given how far away we are), sporty, drama...it's a good mix.
Rowing is a big thing - our women's first boat is Head of the River at the moment, and the men's is 3rd. There are several boats including those just for novices. You can play pretty much any major sport at Magdalen.
The normal day-to-day food isn't stunning, but it's generally fine, and cheap. You can get a three course meal for £3 if you choose the right options. There's a reasonable choice and you get charged per item which is a bonus (some colleges just put a flat rate on).
This sounds really picky (and it is) but Magdalen don't let you see your end-of-term reports, which most undergrads can access online. Your tutor will read them to you, but a kindly paraphrase can sometimes mean you don't quite get the full meaning of the report!
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JoMo1
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(Original post by Everything/Nothing)
Just general questions.
What is the size of the college? Large by Oxford standards. The grounds are huge and there's about 110ish new undergbrads per year.
Is it a good place for English? My english studying friends love it. Google Robert Douglas-Fairhurst. He's the dean as well as the main english tutor and he's had a couple of things in the news recently. Brilliant bloke.
Is it as beautiful as I've read? Yes, God yes.
Is it as smug as I've read? Sometimes, but it's not annoying. We just tend to do well at stuff e.g. Top of the Norrington Table, university challenge etc.
What is the atmosphere-is everyone close? It's big enough that years seem to split off into a couple of 'factions', but most people get on with everyone else. Anyone I'd class as a close friend is in Magdalen and I have quite a few of those.
is it easy to make friends? As easy/easier than anywhere else. It very much depends on you.
How are the drama and poetry societies? We have the Magdalen players, which funds college-centric drama projects, but most drama is done centrally through OUDS, so college is mostly irrelevant.
How is the accommodation? First year - good size for uni accomodation but slightly grubby. Quite nice as you don't feel bad about trashing it as a first year. Post-first year - out-bloody-standing.
-Thank you sincerely for your trouble.
Peace



(Original post by laughylolly)
I've looked at Magdalen. It looks beautiful, I'm really hoping to visit Oxford this year to see it in person.

What would you say were the best things about the college? Financial support, fleet of punts, glorious buildings, you can go up the tower, best kitchen facilities in any college I know of.
Is there a large variety of different sorts of people? To get right to the assumed root of the question: No, not everyone is white, upper class and southern. Everyone I know at Magdalen who went to state schools (which is a majority of my friends) says they were worried about everyone being stuck up public school pricks, but now they've got here they can't really tell who went to which schools. People are people, there's obviously going to be variety.
Are the sports good/what would you say were the main sports played at the college? Sports are pretty good, Mens 1st boat is pretty high in division 1, Women's 1st are top of the river. We play pretty much everything (e.g. I was until a few weeks ago the ultimate frisbee captain). The main sports are Rowing, Rugby, Men's football, women's netball.
Is there anything about the college that has disapointed you? Nope, the college is better than I imagined, Oxford has disappointed me to some degree, but not in any ways that the college could've helped.

Thanks
Hope some of that helps.
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cute_wish
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hello every1 ... ive got 2Bs ,1 A* and 5As in O levels... my predicted A level grades r A ..goin to hav work experience in my home country as m an international student... wud u guys suggest me applyin medicine at oxford...???
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irina793
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(Original post by cute_wish)
hello every1 ... ive got 2Bs ,1 A* and 5As in O levels... my predicted A level grades r A ..goin to hav work experience in my home country as m an international student... wud u guys suggest me applyin medicine at oxford...???
Go for it, you have nothing to lose.
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BJack
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(Original post by cute_wish)
hello every1 ... ive got 2Bs ,1 A* and 5As in O levels... my predicted A level grades r A ..goin to hav work experience in my home country as m an international student... wud u guys suggest me applyin medicine at oxford...???
You won't get in. There are only half a dozen places for international students and your O level results just aren't good enough.
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whenjokersattack
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(Original post by JoMo1)
Hope some of that helps.
You said Oxford has disappointed you to an extent... Can I ask in what way?
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JoMo1
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(Original post by whenjokersattack)
You said Oxford has disappointed you to an extent... Can I ask in what way?
1) It's really, really hard. I intellectually knew before I turned up that it was going to be tough, I just didn't really know what tough meant in an academic sense.

2) Some of the lectures are just plain dreadful.

3) Oxford has beaten my joy for my subject out of me to a large extent. It becomes a constant slog against a tide of work, as opposed to the site of my intellectual maturing. I'm becoming a lot better at what I do, and from what I see elsewhere am being trained a lot better than almost anywhere else in the country, but I'm not at Oxford coming up with new ideas and letting my mind flow free to contemplate the interesting thoughts of humanity. I'm sitting at a desk, trying to burn through ridiculously hard, ridiculously long problem sheets, for a rapidly approaching deadline with a pounding headache because I haven't slept in 36 hours. It's the realization that Oxford work-wise isn't a mystical, magical place, removed from everywhere else. It's exactly like everywhere else, but with 5 times as much work, that's 5 times harder and you get yelled at a lot more for not doing it/doing it badly.

Bear in mind, I'm writing this as a revision break and so it's a tad more cynical than I'd be otherwise. However, it's good to bear in mind that in general, Oxford is really ****ing hard. There's a lot to be said for going 1 level down, being happy and carefree for 3 years and coming out with a damned good degree that no one is going to sniff at. If you want to be the best of the best, then you probably need to be at Oxford, but you're probably never going to be the best of the best, so why be miserable in the process?

Note: I freaking love Oxford. I wouldn't trade my place there for anywhere else and good luck to anyone who tried to wrestle it away from me. I love being surrounded by incredibly smart people the entire time and working with the knowledge that if I put the effort in, and get through the 4 years then I'll come out with a qualification worth my, quite substantial, weight in gold. Punting is also awesome.
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Reminisce
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(Original post by AydanEG)
Right, hi everyone.

I am supposed to be going off to the University of Sheffield to study International Politics in September 2011. I had offers from York, Exeter, Sheffield and Warwick but went for Sheffield because I loved the look of the course and also the city itself. I was rejected from LSE because my GCSEs weren't good enough.

I got 4 A*s 2As and 4Bs ....

HOWEVER, I have since had a change of heart and feel that, given the chance that I may exceed the grade requirement of AAB for Sheffield, I will re-apply to university next year to study History. Oxford would be one of my choices this time around - It didn't feature last time as they had no designated International Politics course. I won't need to worry about this however if I'm applying for history.

Does anyone have any advice regarding the best colleges to apply to given my preference to read History. My heart is telling me Magdalen but they might be cautious of my 4Bs at GCSE - I like to hope that AAA/A*AA in my A levels will override this problem but who knows!

So yeah, any help and advice would be great!!
From various informative events, I think that Oxford has a diminished emphasis on the importance of colleges for academics compared to Cambridge where choice of college does matter slightly. For example, some Cambridge colleges have a pre-interview test for mathematics as well whereas others only do STEP, Oxford colleges however as far as I am aware is virtually identical in terms of the selection process so they suggest that you make the decision on the basis of where you'd prefer to live for the next 3/4 years.
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anyone_can_fly
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(Original post by JoMo1)
1) It's really, really hard. I intellectually knew before I turned up that it was going to be tough, I just didn't really know what tough meant in an academic sense.

2) Some of the lectures are just plain dreadful.

3) Oxford has beaten my joy for my subject out of me to a large extent. It becomes a constant slog against a tide of work, as opposed to the site of my intellectual maturing. I'm becoming a lot better at what I do, and from what I see elsewhere am being trained a lot better than almost anywhere else in the country, but I'm not at Oxford coming up with new ideas and letting my mind flow free to contemplate the interesting thoughts of humanity. I'm sitting at a desk, trying to burn through ridiculously hard, ridiculously long problem sheets, for a rapidly approaching deadline with a pounding headache because I haven't slept in 36 hours. It's the realization that Oxford work-wise isn't a mystical, magical place, removed from everywhere else. It's exactly like everywhere else, but with 5 times as much work, that's 5 times harder and you get yelled at a lot more for not doing it/doing it badly.

Bear in mind, I'm writing this as a revision break and so it's a tad more cynical than I'd be otherwise. However, it's good to bear in mind that in general, Oxford is really ****ing hard. There's a lot to be said for going 1 level down, being happy and carefree for 3 years and coming out with a damned good degree that no one is going to sniff at. If you want to be the best of the best, then you probably need to be at Oxford, but you're probably never going to be the best of the best, so why be miserable in the process?

Note: I freaking love Oxford. I wouldn't trade my place there for anywhere else and good luck to anyone who tried to wrestle it away from me. I love being surrounded by incredibly smart people the entire time and working with the knowledge that if I put the effort in, and get through the 4 years then I'll come out with a qualification worth my, quite substantial, weight in gold. Punting is also awesome.

A maths person! Can I ask you some annoying questions? Don't feel you have to answer them if you're busy.
1) You sound like you're not enjoying the course much. Is that something you feel would be different at a different uni?
2) What are the problem sheets like? Apart from being hard and long. Do you need to think creatively, or is it just looking up an example in a textbook and copying it/ writing screeds and screeds of manipulation?
3) How much do you need to work in a week? Do you work about an average amount?
4) Any idea whether these things would be different at Cambridge?
5) Is there anything else you wish you'd known before applying?

Thank you!
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JoMo1
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(Original post by anyone_can_fly)
A maths person! Can I ask you some annoying questions? Don't feel you have to answer them if you're busy.
1) You sound like you're not enjoying the course much. Is that something you feel would be different at a different uni?
2) What are the problem sheets like? Apart from being hard and long. Do you need to think creatively, or is it just looking up an example in a textbook and copying it/ writing screeds and screeds of manipulation?
3) How much do you need to work in a week? Do you work about an average amount?
4) Any idea whether these things would be different at Cambridge?
5) Is there anything else you wish you'd known before applying?

Thank you!
1) It's a difficult dichotomy to explain. It's very love-hate. I wouldn't want to be doing any other subject, and if it was any easier I'd be annoyed that it wasn't harder. It just becomes so hard that you never really know what's going on, and your confidence isn't exactly paramount. If you really do like maths before you start then you should be fine. It's the people who decide to do it because they think they should, or they might as well, that end up becoming miserable.
2) Very occasionally it's copying out essential examples, or taking an example and altering it to your needs. However, most of the time they require original thought and linking together lots of ideas. Some also have long chunks of algebraic manipulation, but it very much depends on the course. The applied ones tend to have more example copying/manipulations in them. The pure courses are a lot more about figuring out an argument in your head and then writing it down rigorously, linking together lots of ideas.
3) Depends very much on how smart you are. We got told to work 9-5 every weekday when we started but no mathmos I know do that much, sleep gets in the way. I'd be making it up if I told you how often I work though. I'm very sporadic about it.
4) As far as I know, Cambridge is a bit harder and more competitive, but essentially the same.
5) Everything you've done so far in maths is the kind of thing you'd do in an applied maths course. Pure maths is nothing like anything you've seen.

Feel free to ask anything else you want to know.
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Zoedotdot
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(Original post by Reminisce)
From various informative events, I think that Oxford has a diminished emphasis on the importance of colleges for academics compared to Cambridge where choice of college does matter slightly. For example, some Cambridge colleges have a pre-interview test for mathematics as well whereas others only do STEP, Oxford colleges however as far as I am aware is virtually identical in terms of the selection process so they suggest that you make the decision on the basis of where you'd prefer to live for the next 3/4 years.
In case anyone in here is thinking of applying to Cambridge, I should just clarify that while there is a tiny bit of variation in the college admissions procedures the effect is absolutely miniscule and I've never actually heard it recommended that you apply for a Cambridge college based on anything other than it being a place where you'd like to live. Often these pre-interview tests are used as a basis for your interview (the Maths test at Trinity for example) And they don't exist for that many subjects either so aren't the hugest consideration, college choice should largely be approached in the same way as you would approach it at Oxford!

/intrusion :p:
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laughylolly
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(Original post by EdmundB)
The music, the deer park, and the fact I've yet to meet more than a couple of people with whom I don't get along.
All sorts - clubbers, people who like quiet nights in, union types (although not too many given how far away we are), sporty, drama...it's a good mix.
Rowing is a big thing - our women's first boat is Head of the River at the moment, and the men's is 3rd. There are several boats including those just for novices. You can play pretty much any major sport at Magdalen.
The normal day-to-day food isn't stunning, but it's generally fine, and cheap. You can get a three course meal for £3 if you choose the right options. There's a reasonable choice and you get charged per item which is a bonus (some colleges just put a flat rate on).
This sounds really picky (and it is) but Magdalen don't let you see your end-of-term reports, which most undergrads can access online. Your tutor will read them to you, but a kindly paraphrase can sometimes mean you don't quite get the full meaning of the report!
Thanks for the reply. Is the food alright for kinda of fussy people? I can cook so if there are good kitchen facilities (which I've heard there are) this shouldn't really be a problem for me. And do they offer food for people with nut allergies?

(Original post by JoMo1)
I've looked at Magdalen. It looks beautiful, I'm really hoping to visit Oxford this year to see it in person.

What would you say were the best things about the college? Financial support, fleet of punts, glorious buildings, you can go up the tower, best kitchen facilities in any college I know of.
Is there a large variety of different sorts of people? To get right to the assumed root of the question: No, not everyone is white, upper class and southern. Everyone I know at Magdalen who went to state schools (which is a majority of my friends) says they were worried about everyone being stuck up public school pricks, but now they've got here they can't really tell who went to which schools. People are people, there's obviously going to be variety.
Are the sports good/what would you say were the main sports played at the college? Sports are pretty good, Mens 1st boat is pretty high in division 1, Women's 1st are top of the river. We play pretty much everything (e.g. I was until a few weeks ago the ultimate frisbee captain). The main sports are Rowing, Rugby, Men's football, women's netball.
Is there anything about the college that has disapointed you? Nope, the college is better than I imagined, Oxford has disappointed me to some degree, but not in any ways that the college could've helped.

Hope some of that helps.
Thanks for the reply. I actually go to a public school (only been at it for less than a year though) and I found it hard-ish to fit in - previous to this I was at private schools abroad. I would just be worried that it would be like fitting into a public school.

I also noticed you are doing maths, which is actually what I want to apply for at Oxford. How have you found the course?
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JoMo1
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(Original post by laughylolly)
Thanks for the reply. Is the food alright for kinda of fussy people? I can cook so if there are good kitchen facilities (which I've heard there are) this shouldn't really be a problem for me. And do they offer food for people with nut allergies?



Thanks for the reply. I actually go to a public school (only been at it for less than a year though) and I found it hard-ish to fit in - previous to this I was at private schools abroad. I would just be worried that it would be like fitting into a public school.

I also noticed you are doing maths, which is actually what I want to apply for at Oxford. How have you found the course?
I pretty much refuse to eat in hall, but I'm a chronic foody and cook all of my own meals, and for most of my friends. I don't know about allergies, but that should be on the Magdalen website. You're guaranteed sensible access to a kitchen in 1st year (if you tell them you have allergies so could really do with a sensibly sized kitchens as you'll have to cook a lot, you'll probably get one of the nicer kitchens).

I'm not going to promise you you'll fit in, because that's a lie, but Magdalen won't prevent you from doing so. Fitting in is very much dependent on your year, where you live, what you're like etc. but there are very few people who've really made an effort and not fitted in somewhere. The majority of people are nice and friendly.

See a couple of posts up for my 2 rants about maths.
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laughylolly
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(Original post by JoMo1)
I pretty much refuse to eat in hall, but I'm a chronic foody and cook all of my own meals, and for most of my friends. I don't know about allergies, but that should be on the Magdalen website. You're guaranteed sensible access to a kitchen in 1st year (if you tell them you have allergies so could really do with a sensibly sized kitchens as you'll have to cook a lot, you'll probably get one of the nicer kitchens).

I'm not going to promise you you'll fit in, because that's a lie, but Magdalen won't prevent you from doing so. Fitting in is very much dependent on your year, where you live, what you're like etc. but there are very few people who've really made an effort and not fitted in somewhere. The majority of people are nice and friendly.

See a couple of posts up for my 2 rants about maths.
Alright, I'll see about that if I do get an offer... Just wanted to know about these things so I do put down a college that's suitable for me.

I think the main problem with my school is that they didn't get a lot of new people and new people that do come are from the area so they already know people at the school. So every has known everyone from a very young age and I hadn't. But I guess at university everyone is starting new again so... I've been to 5 other schools and had no problem so hopefully it will be alright if I do go to Oxford or any other university...

Read the rants, is it really that awful? Are there any moments that you do really enjoy when studying maths?
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BJack
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(Original post by laughylolly)
Read the rants, is it really that awful? Are there any moments that you do really enjoy when studying maths?
Probably the very end of week 8. That's certainly my favourite part of term. :sigh:
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whenjokersattack
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(Original post by JoMo1)
There's a lot to be said for going 1 level down, being happy and carefree for 3 years and coming out with a damned good degree that no one is going to sniff at.
Yeah this is what I'm thinking. But tbh it's so hard to get in there in the first instance that I might as well try, and if I do I guess it was 'meant to be'...

And thanks for your help/honesty. And I love punting too- I went once and managed to fall in... but it was still brilliant!
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dragonmeister
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Username: dragonmeister
Subject: PPE (there are a lot of us, aren't there?)
College: Magdalen, New or Oriel (subject to change)
AS Subjects: Maths (& A2 this year), History, Politics, Physics, General Studies <- already done, A
GCSEs: 9A*s, 3As, A in Add. Maths
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JoMo1
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(Original post by laughylolly)
Alright, I'll see about that if I do get an offer... Just wanted to know about these things so I do put down a college that's suitable for me.

I think the main problem with my school is that they didn't get a lot of new people and new people that do come are from the area so they already know people at the school. So every has known everyone from a very young age and I hadn't. But I guess at university everyone is starting new again so... I've been to 5 other schools and had no problem so hopefully it will be alright if I do go to Oxford or any other university...

Read the rants, is it really that awful? Are there any moments that you do really enjoy when studying maths?
Yeah, friendswise you should be fine.

It isn't really that awful. I was in the middle of summarising lecture notes for revision purposes when I wrote the rants, so that's about as angry as I get about it. I do genuinely enjoy moments of being really smart, but maths is definitely a subject where you suffer through hours of frustration to get to the "God I'm a smart mother ****er" moment.
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JoMo1
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(Original post by dragonmeister)
Username: dragonmeister
Subject: PPE (there are a lot of us, aren't there?)
College: Magdalen, New or Oriel (subject to change)
AS Subjects: Maths (& A2 this year), History, Politics, Physics, General Studies <- already done, A
GCSEs: 9A*s, 3As, A in Add. Maths
for PPE I'd suggest Magdalen, it has a famously low PPE workload. Everywhere else it's one of the hardest degrees in existence, at Magdalen it's one of the lighter ones, yet you're still bloody well set up with it. The number of cabinet members who are ex-magdalen is ridiculous and the politics tutor is a certain Lord Stewart Wood. Ex-Special Advisor to Gordon Brown, and current Communications Director to Ed Milliband. A man so smart he won Ed Milliband the Labour leadership. I couldn't have won Ed Milliband the labour leadership if he'd been running against a pair of his own shoes.
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anyone_can_fly
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(Original post by JoMo1)
1) It's a difficult dichotomy to explain. It's very love-hate. I wouldn't want to be doing any other subject, and if it was any easier I'd be annoyed that it wasn't harder. It just becomes so hard that you never really know what's going on, and your confidence isn't exactly paramount. If you really do like maths before you start then you should be fine. It's the people who decide to do it because they think they should, or they might as well, that end up becoming miserable.
2) Very occasionally it's copying out essential examples, or taking an example and altering it to your needs. However, most of the time they require original thought and linking together lots of ideas. Some also have long chunks of algebraic manipulation, but it very much depends on the course. The applied ones tend to have more example copying/manipulations in them. The pure courses are a lot more about figuring out an argument in your head and then writing it down rigorously, linking together lots of ideas.
3) Depends very much on how smart you are. We got told to work 9-5 every weekday when we started but no mathmos I know do that much, sleep gets in the way. I'd be making it up if I told you how often I work though. I'm very sporadic about it.
4) As far as I know, Cambridge is a bit harder and more competitive, but essentially the same.
5) Everything you've done so far in maths is the kind of thing you'd do in an applied maths course. Pure maths is nothing like anything you've seen.
Thank you so much, that was really helpful!

(Original post by JoMo1)
I do genuinely enjoy moments of being really smart, but maths is definitely a subject where you suffer through hours of frustration to get to the "God I'm a smart mother ****er" moment.
http://spikedmath.com/393.html
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