Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I thought this exam was today at 2 rather than tomorrow at 2 i'm so glad i have another day to revise...

    does anyone have any predictions for what character they might ask us about for king lear? I really hope the fool *_*
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by abismall)
    Basically, just how the first half of the play oscillates between Rome
    And Egypt scene by scene, mirroring the division in Anthony- the scenes are pretty lengthy. Act 3 scene 4 when Anthony and Octavia are in Athens is the turning point of the play. It's the midpoint of the action, and Athens is also midway between Rome and Egypt- it's significance is summed up by Octavia 'no midway twixt these extremes at all'. From here, the scenes become more condensed, mirroring Caesar's advancement, and the tension builds up as Anthony and Cleo's deaths approach- that's pretty much all I have!


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    That is a really good point - do you have any references to how the play was performed/ presented to the audience as my teacher told me yesterday and I have nothing!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hootee)
    I thought this exam was today at 2 rather than tomorrow at 2 i'm so glad i have another day to revise...

    does anyone have any predictions for what character they might ask us about for king lear? I really hope the fool *_*
    Oh my goodness, i was just skim reading the posts and i sort of misread this as 'i thought the exam to day was... 'and had a complete panic attack that it was today! :P

    Bleeh hope not the fool, i don't think i know as much as i should about him
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by xCrazyStarsz)
    HI! your points are really good!
    I'm finding it very difficult to compare between both the texts and would be eternally grateful if you can post a few more points for comparisons!

    x
    Thanks
    I have studied 6 main poems so I will give you the points I have found for each.
    The Garden: There is a contrast here between the purity of the garden and the corruption of Venice, so you can talk about how the speaker finds 'Innocence' and 'Quiet' in the garden, while Venice is the exact opposite, full of corrupt, Machiavellian characters and a preoccupation with material posessions.
    On A Drop of Dew:
    The drop of dew pines to be delivered back to heaven, where it is pure, from the corrupt earth which it has descended to. It rejects the 'purple flower', which parallels to Celia's rejection of Volpone's temptations - "Thy baths shall be the juice of July flowers" - and Celia, like the soul, pines and appeals to God to be delivered from Volpone's chamber and the corruption which surrounds her. Both are eventually delivered from the corruption and thus rewarded for their faith, while Volpone is ruined as a result of his lust - thus showing the repercussions of yielding to temptation.
    Damon The Mower:
    The Mower speaks of heat as a metaphor for his love for Juliana, saying it burns him and the fields both. Volpone, after seeing Celia, speaks of Cupid shooting into him like a flame, and burning him. Thus both characters are in pain as a result of their burning passion for a woman. Both characters, furthermore, are driven mad by this. Volpone is so obsessed with his lust for Celia that he no longer cares about his money, and ends up being ruined as a result, and Damon is so preoccupied by his unrequited love for Juliana that he cuts himself down with his own scythe and is ruined by his sorrow - "the mower mown". You could also talk about misogyny - how Celia is presented as typically virtuous, while Juliana is presented as an Eve character who ruins Damon (Adam) and separates him from his garden (Eden).
    The Mower's Song:
    Similar points to the above - Volpone is ruined by Celia and The Mower is ruined by Juliana. You can talk about setting here - Volpone is already corrupt, his lust for Celia corrupts him further, and he is in a corrupt setting (Venice). By contrast, the mower starts out as pure and naive, and at one with nature - "My mind was once the true survey/Of all these meadows fresh and gay" - and he is corrupted by Juliana and his lust for her, and his relationship with nature and his meadows is ruined - again there is a comparison here to the Garden of Eden.
    A Picture of Little TC in a Prospect of Flowers:
    TC is a virtuous, pure character, so there is an obvious comparison to Celia. They both fight against lust - Celia against Volpone's lust and TC against 'Wanton Love' with their chastity - and both are victorious. Again you can talk about setting - TC is in a garden, an appropriate setting for her purity, while Celia is out of place in Venice, a city which is full of corruption. Both Celia and TC are also very beautiful, so there is an association of purity with beauty.
    To His Coy Mistress:
    This, in my opinion, is the best to compare to Volpone (fingers crossed I get an essay title that works so I can write about this!). Volpone presents a song to Celia while attempting to seduce her, which parallels with this poem and follows the same CARPE DIEM tradition. Both talk of Time, and its passing, and use this as an argument that their respective mistresses should yield to their seduction - "Time's winged chariot" and "Time will not be ours forever". Volpone, however, spends a long time trying to seduce Celia, which eventually leads to him failing, while To His Coy Mistress does not beat around the bush, so to speak, and is very fast-paced to try and persuade the mistress as quickly as possible.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by binxgillam)
    Thanks
    I have studied 6 main poems so I will give you the points I have found for each.
    The Garden: There is a contrast here between the purity of the garden and the corruption of Venice, so you can talk about how the speaker finds 'Innocence' and 'Quiet' in the garden, while Venice is the exact opposite, full of corrupt, Machiavellian characters and a preoccupation with material posessions.
    On A Drop of Dew:
    The drop of dew pines to be delivered back to heaven, where it is pure, from the corrupt earth which it has descended to. It rejects the 'purple flower', which parallels to Celia's rejection of Volpone's temptations - "Thy baths shall be the juice of July flowers" - and Celia, like the soul, pines and appeals to God to be delivered from Volpone's chamber and the corruption which surrounds her. Both are eventually delivered from the corruption and thus rewarded for their faith, while Volpone is ruined as a result of his lust - thus showing the repercussions of yielding to temptation.
    Damon The Mower:
    The Mower speaks of heat as a metaphor for his love for Juliana, saying it burns him and the fields both. Volpone, after seeing Celia, speaks of Cupid shooting into him like a flame, and burning him. Thus both characters are in pain as a result of their burning passion for a woman. Both characters, furthermore, are driven mad by this. Volpone is so obsessed with his lust for Celia that he no longer cares about his money, and ends up being ruined as a result, and Damon is so preoccupied by his unrequited love for Juliana that he cuts himself down with his own scythe and is ruined by his sorrow - "the mower mown". You could also talk about misogyny - how Celia is presented as typically virtuous, while Juliana is presented as an Eve character who ruins Damon (Adam) and separates him from his garden (Eden).
    The Mower's Song:
    Similar points to the above - Volpone is ruined by Celia and The Mower is ruined by Juliana. You can talk about setting here - Volpone is already corrupt, his lust for Celia corrupts him further, and he is in a corrupt setting (Venice). By contrast, the mower starts out as pure and naive, and at one with nature - "My mind was once the true survey/Of all these meadows fresh and gay" - and he is corrupted by Juliana and his lust for her, and his relationship with nature and his meadows is ruined - again there is a comparison here to the Garden of Eden.
    A Picture of Little TC in a Prospect of Flowers:
    TC is a virtuous, pure character, so there is an obvious comparison to Celia. They both fight against lust - Celia against Volpone's lust and TC against 'Wanton Love' with their chastity - and both are victorious. Again you can talk about setting - TC is in a garden, an appropriate setting for her purity, while Celia is out of place in Venice, a city which is full of corruption. Both Celia and TC are also very beautiful, so there is an association of purity with beauty.
    To His Coy Mistress:
    This, in my opinion, is the best to compare to Volpone (fingers crossed I get an essay title that works so I can write about this!). Volpone presents a song to Celia while attempting to seduce her, which parallels with this poem and follows the same CARPE DIEM tradition. Both talk of Time, and its passing, and use this as an argument that their respective mistresses should yield to their seduction - "Time's winged chariot" and "Time will not be ours forever". Volpone, however, spends a long time trying to seduce Celia, which eventually leads to him failing, while To His Coy Mistress does not beat around the bush, so to speak, and is very fast-paced to try and persuade the mistress as quickly as possible.
    Thank You SOOOO MUCH!! your a life saver ! I'm sure you'll do exceptionally well in your exam!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Anyone doing King Lear-

    Can you please help me analyse when Poor Tom/Edgar says 'reason in madness'..
    How would you say it in a sentence?

    Thanks!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by xCrazyStarsz)
    Thank You SOOOO MUCH!! your a life saver ! I'm sure you'll do exceptionally well in your exam!
    You're welcome glad I could help! What has your teacher told you about how many poems to write about for Marvell?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cest la vie)
    That is a really good point - do you have any references to how the play was performed/ presented to the audience as my teacher told me yesterday and I have nothing!
    You can talk about how it would have been a boy in the part of Cleopatra, and refer to the quote "Some squeaking Cleopatra boy my greatness". My teacher made the point that this was one of three tragedies with strong female characters which Shakespeare wrote in a row, (Macbeth and Coriolanus beint the other two), so he may have had a particularly skilled boy actor in his troupe of actors at the time, who could have manage to portray such strong female roles.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by binxgillam)
    You can talk about how it would have been a boy in the part of Cleopatra, and refer to the quote "Some squeaking Cleopatra boy my greatness". My teacher made the point that this was one of three tragedies with strong female characters which Shakespeare wrote in a row, (Macbeth and Coriolanus beint the other two), so he may have had a particularly skilled boy actor in his troupe of actors at the time, who could have manage to portray such strong female roles.
    Thank you!
    so the same boy played Cleopatra and Lady Macbeth i am guessing?
    Why did they use boys to play them?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm really struggling to find critics for Blakes Songs of Innocence and of Experience... I've got a few from Northrop Frye but thats all!! Anyone doing this too have any to share??
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 1234jan27)
    I'm really struggling to find critics for Blakes Songs of Innocence and of Experience... I've got a few from Northrop Frye but thats all!! Anyone doing this too have any to share??

    C.M Bowra and Wolf Mankowitz, Bowra is especially good if you can find any, because she has written so much.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 1234jan27)
    I'm really struggling to find critics for Blakes Songs of Innocence and of Experience... I've got a few from Northrop Frye but thats all!! Anyone doing this too have any to share??
    Margaret Bottrall: “Their apparent simplicity has been their chief passport to popularity” “They repay pondering, investigation and analysis”
    When Blake died in 1827, obituaries in papers and magazines described him as a designer and illustrator... NOT a poet.
    Garth Wilkinson was the first to put the songs onto the market in 1839. It was done so anonymously.
    H.G. Hewlett called Blake an “imperfect genius” while Margaret Bottrall thought he was an “isolated dreamer.” M.H. Abrams considered him a “phoenix among poets”
    In an essay, David V. Erdman described the songs as “a poets interpretation of the history of his own time.
    Northorp Frye said of Experience; “Contempt and Horror have never been more clearly spoken in English poetry”
    Rossetti found some of his poems to be “cryptic”
    Bottrall commented that “What you find in Blake depends largely on what you expect to find”
    Hazard Adams wrote that “[They] evoke a vast world of particulars, shading and shifting into one another”
    Hazlitt described the songs as “beautiful”
    Coleridge named him a “genius” but found himself being “perplexed” by some poems, such as ‘The Blossom’ and ‘A Little Girl Lost’
    Caroline Bowles said of Blake, “Mad though he might be, he was gifted.”
    James Thomson said “Blake was always poor in world’s wealth, always rich in spiritual wealth”
    T.S. Eliot said that Blake’s philosophy “resembles an ingeneous piece of home-made furniture”
    Catherine (His wife) said “I have very little of Mr. Blake’s company; he is always in paradise”

    Wordsworth referred to him as an “unfortunate lunatic”

    A. Gilchrist called him a “divine child” “whose playthings were the sun, moon, the stars, the heavens and the earth.”
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by binxgillam)
    I do I've taken pictures of it because it's handwritten (I hope my writing is legible hahah) and I only got 26 out of 30 because I didn't include enough contextual knowledge to satisfy A04. The question was about the effects of emotion on the characters' decisions in the play.
    Attachment 223546
    Attachment 223545
    Attachment 223547
    Attachment 223549
    Attachment 223550
    Attachment 223551
    Thank you so much!! That essay was brill, good luck for the exam!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hootee)
    Margaret Bottrall: “Their apparent simplicity has been their chief passport to popularity” “They repay pondering, investigation and analysis”
    When Blake died in 1827, obituaries in papers and magazines described him as a designer and illustrator... NOT a poet.
    Garth Wilkinson was the first to put the songs onto the market in 1839. It was done so anonymously.
    H.G. Hewlett called Blake an “imperfect genius” while Margaret Bottrall thought he was an “isolated dreamer.” M.H. Abrams considered him a “phoenix among poets”
    In an essay, David V. Erdman described the songs as “a poets interpretation of the history of his own time.
    Northorp Frye said of Experience; “Contempt and Horror have never been more clearly spoken in English poetry”
    Rossetti found some of his poems to be “cryptic”
    Bottrall commented that “What you find in Blake depends largely on what you expect to find”
    Hazard Adams wrote that “[They] evoke a vast world of particulars, shading and shifting into one another”
    Hazlitt described the songs as “beautiful”
    Coleridge named him a “genius” but found himself being “perplexed” by some poems, such as ‘The Blossom’ and ‘A Little Girl Lost’
    Caroline Bowles said of Blake, “Mad though he might be, he was gifted.”
    James Thomson said “Blake was always poor in world’s wealth, always rich in spiritual wealth”
    T.S. Eliot said that Blake’s philosophy “resembles an ingeneous piece of home-made furniture”
    Catherine (His wife) said “I have very little of Mr. Blake’s company; he is always in paradise”

    Wordsworth referred to him as an “unfortunate lunatic”

    A. Gilchrist called him a “divine child” “whose playthings were the sun, moon, the stars, the heavens and the earth.”

    thank you thats really helpful. good luck
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cest la vie)
    Thank you!
    so the same boy played Cleopatra and Lady Macbeth i am guessing?
    Why did they use boys to play them?
    I wouldn't say that outright, because there isn't strong evidence, but it is certainly probable. They used boy actors because women were not permitted to perform on stage in Shakespeare's time, as it was considered improper, and a boy was preferable to a man because their voice would not yet have broken, so they would be able to play a more believable woman.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    for king lear I have character essay plans on edmund/lear/the fool/women .... do you think these are enough? Can they really ask us a question on kent/edgar....or Gloucester or albany?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Cannot believe the exam is tomorrow - Sooo nervous because I need an A and cannot afford to muck up tips tips tips pleeaasse!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hootee)
    for king lear I have character essay plans on edmund/lear/the fool/women .... do you think these are enough? Can they really ask us a question on kent/edgar....or Gloucester or albany?
    I think Edgar is an important character because he earns the trust of Lear and Gloucester (despite concealing his identity) even as a beggar - one who was right at the bottom of the social pile. He also has the closing lines of the play and almost voices a moral which is a testament to his importance. Kent - I would do it just to be safe because, like Edgar, he uses a disguise (although his role isn't a prominent - so cover it in less detail).

    Gloucester I would focus on because him, Edmund and Edgar make up the subplot which mirrors the main plot and, at some points of the play, is just as important. They also coincide. I wouldn't worry about Albany - I personally wouldn't bother with him plus I've forgotten what he's like in the play anyway xD.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Given that this is the first exam with these texts I believe that the questions are probably going to be rather nice (they were in the AS ones last June).
    My predictions for King Lear are:
    -Lear himself - i.e. is he a tragic hero?
    or
    -Theme of Madness
    or
    -Moral Blindness/ Loyalty V Betrayal.

    Comparison of texts - I'm doing Tis Pity and The Wyf of Bath's P+T, predictions:
    -Marriage
    -Religion
    -Desire
    -Debate

    Hope this helps? GOOD LUCK TOMORROW EVERYONE!!!!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gman10)
    Cannot believe the exam is tomorrow - Sooo nervous because I need an A and cannot afford to muck up tips tips tips pleeaasse!
    Read the question carefully and make sure you are actually answering it which is the most common mistake people make... constantly refer back to the quote in the Q
    Remember AO2 dominant for Shakespeare and AO4 for the comparison.
    Stay calm and make a plan of your ideas before hand even if it doesn't make sense and isn't a strict plan to stick to it will help you understand the question.
    Good luck!
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you rather give up salt or pepper?
    Useful resources

    Make your revision easier

    OMAM

    Ultimate Of Mice And Men Thread

    Plot, context, character analysis and everything in between.

    Notes

    Revision Hub

    All our revision materials in one place

    Love books

    Common grammar and vocabulary problems

    Get your questions asked and answered

    Useful literary websitesStudy help rules and posting guidelines

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.