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    (Original post by alem)
    That's a bit weird considering I have seen so many papers marked 58 and over. Not only that but a few people in my class got A's, they never even attempt to answer any questions in class and if they do, they give vague answers! Yet, they end up with A's in exams. :confused:
    IS there any justice in the world?

    I joke its just about exam technique or, there what you call snaking
    Definition of snaking: pretending you suck at everything and you don't revise to everyone in your class then banging out at home.
    Morale of story ' Never underestimate your peer '
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    (Original post by CharlieTT)
    No. Net profit is gross profit minus overheads. Operating profit takes into account all revenues and costs from regular trading but none from one-off events.

    If gross profits are rising but operating profit is falling, then it means the company isn't controlling its costs.
    I think he means in terms of working out operational profit margin, then again it wasn't that clear
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    I'm still kind of confused on this whole 'exam technique' for Q4.

    In the example essays some people put a few different points in ONE big paragraph, but I thought you were suppose to have one point per paragraph?
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    (Original post by laurenculver24)
    I'm still kind of confused on this whole 'exam technique' for Q4.

    In the example essays some people put a few different points in ONE big paragraph, but I thought you were suppose to have one point per paragraph?
    1. Structure - keep it simple

    Use the three parts of the question to split your answer into three sections as sub-headings, this will help to focus your points and keep your structure logical. A good approach is to stick to two paragraphs of ‘for’ and two ‘against’, with a final section for the ‘recommendations’

    2. Data, data, data

    Make sure the paragraphs of ‘for’ and ‘against’ have plenty of data from the appendices to back up your points. This will strengthen both your application and analysis. The best points/paragraphs are ones that can identify and explain links between two different pieces of data, for example you might see that staff are paid piece rate, and that this has improved productivity

    3. Focused analysis

    When you start a paragraph ‘for’ or ‘against’ make sure you can analyse the point you are making back to the overall plan. WHY does that data/point suggest they should/should not go ahead with the plan? This should be the key focus of all your paragraphs

    4. Recommendations

    Here, you need a FIRM judgement. No fence-sitting!! Should the business go ahead with the plan? Why do you think they should/should not. Use evidence to back your judgement up and link it back to the overall aims and objectives of this business. It is then a good idea to consider what the success of this plan might depend on. Think functional areas….might it depend on finance? (can they afford it?)....perhaps it depends on operations (do they have enough capacity?)...it could depend on Human Resources (how might staff react?)...or perhaps on marketing (image/market size).
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    Praying for a nice case study!
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    Just a recommendation. You guys should bring 4 highlighters with you. 3 for the Functions you're studying and 1 for Corporate/Functional Objectives. Very useful when flicking through the case study.
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    (Original post by CharlieTT)
    Just a recommendation. You guys should bring 4 highlighters with you. 3 for the Functions you're studying and 1 for Corporate/Functional Objectives. Very useful when flicking through the case study.
    That is such a good idea..
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    (Original post by dulwin)
    1. Structure - keep it simple

    Use the three parts of the question to split your answer into three sections as sub-headings, this will help to focus your points and keep your structure logical. A good approach is to stick to two paragraphs of ‘for’ and two ‘against’, with a final section for the ‘recommendations’

    2. Data, data, data

    Make sure the paragraphs of ‘for’ and ‘against’ have plenty of data from the appendices to back up your points. This will strengthen both your application and analysis. The best points/paragraphs are ones that can identify and explain links between two different pieces of data, for example you might see that staff are paid piece rate, and that this has improved productivity

    3. Focused analysis

    When you start a paragraph ‘for’ or ‘against’ make sure you can analyse the point you are making back to the overall plan. WHY does that data/point suggest they should/should not go ahead with the plan? This should be the key focus of all your paragraphs

    4. Recommendations

    Here, you need a FIRM judgement. No fence-sitting!! Should the business go ahead with the plan? Why do you think they should/should not. Use evidence to back your judgement up and link it back to the overall aims and objectives of this business. It is then a good idea to consider what the success of this plan might depend on. Think functional areas….might it depend on finance? (can they afford it?)....perhaps it depends on operations (do they have enough capacity?)...it could depend on Human Resources (how might staff react?)...or perhaps on marketing (image/market size).
    So you'd have one point per paragraph, but expand is in GREAT detail? and compare it to other aspects of the business e.g. HR?

    You do 2 F 1 A or 2 A 1 F, right? If you have time or can find a 4th point you can include that too
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    The exam is 2 hours away guys! How you all feeling?
    Personally I have a feeling this is going to be a good exam, am holding out for Finance, Operations and Marketing.
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    Will only three functions come up?
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    (Original post by laurenculver24)
    So you'd have one point per paragraph, but expand is in GREAT detail? and compare it to other aspects of the business e.g. HR?

    You do 2 F 1 A or 2 A 1 F, right? If you have time or can find a 4th point you can include that too
    Yes exactly, don't make too many points. 2F 2A 1Recommendation and overall judgement is fine
    Try to link back to the other functional areas and also to the proposed plan.
    Exam technique is key here, just try not to feel as if you have to write many points, no don't do that, just focus on making a point, then use relevant information from case study and analyse the point you are making.
    And evaluation at the end: 3 ways to get good evaluation (1) make a reasonable judgement (2) support it with reasons from your previous arguments (summarise) (3) make recommendations!
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    (Original post by RKAUR)
    Will only three functions come up?
    First 3 question are about a function each, the last one is about all of them.
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    Good luck to everyone
    The exam is at 1, any more help needed, quickly ask here!
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    (Original post by dulwin)
    Good luck to everyone
    The exam is at 1, any more help needed, quickly ask here!
    Mine's at 1:30PM. Woohoo extra half hour! xD
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    (Original post by CharlieTT)
    Mine's at 1:30PM. Woohoo extra half hour! xD
    Ahh you're lucky lol
    I will have a post ready right after the exam
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    So what exactly does npv, arr and payback tell us! How do we know if they are good ? And what would we have to say about them?
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    (Original post by coolgirl1999)
    So what exactly does npv, arr and payback tell us! How do we know if they are good ? And what would we have to say about them?
    Not sure about NPV, but the ARR and payback are investment appraisals, helping a business find out if they should go along with the investment/project. For example, if a business invested £100,000 in a project, and the payback worked out to be 2.4 years, it shows it will take 2.4 years to get the £100,000 BACK (the original investment).

    ARR is the amount of average annual profit they receive from the investment. The higher the better. If it's negative or not any good, they may not want to go along with the investment (the paper might refer to 2 different projects, so in this case you can work out what project has the best payback and highest ARR - so the business knows what project to take on).
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    (Original post by coolgirl1999)
    So what exactly does npv, arr and payback tell us! How do we know if they are good ? And what would we have to say about them?
    Net Present Value tells us how much the net cash flow in a year is worth by the end of the year.
    Average Rate of Return tells us the average return on an investment a firm would see each year.
    Payback tells us how long it would take a firm to pay off an investment.

    We know NPV is good if it is a positive number. We know ARR is good if it is high. We know Payback is good if it's short.

    We would have to calculate them and explain if the Business is in a good financial state because of it.
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    Just a last minute question. Should I incorporate Ansoff's Matrix in the last question regardless whether the question is on marketing or not ?
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    (Original post by arnoob)
    Just a last minute question. Should I incorporate Ansoff's Matrix in the last question regardless whether the question is on marketing or not ?
    Ansoff's Matrix is used when a Firm's objective is Growth. So if the case business' objective is growth then go right ahead.
 
 
 
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