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    (Original post by CasualSoul)
    Okay okay maybe I got a bit carried away lol I doubt they would ask something like that

    hmm do you think harm includes emotional harm or just physical harm i.e. obv if she would die giving birth due to some sort of long term health complication then the abortion would be performed. However if she would become severely depressed and possible form other mental health issues I wonder if that could be used to justify the abortion as well.

    I know right! it just came into my head and got me thinking O_o
    In England, Wales and Scotland, termination is permitted at any stage of pregnancy on the grounds of foetal abnormality. A colleague of
    mine terminated a much wanted baby at 27 weeks for this reason. The law in Ireland is different.

    Firstly, it is best not to use the word abortion. This word is usually used by the prolife lobby and is this quite a strong term. Better to stick with the medical term, "termination".

    If you are going to discuss issues such as termination then it would be a good idea to brush-up on the law. For example, termination in the UK is not an absolute right. It is ONLY permitted if continuance of the pregnancy would pose a risk of injury to the physical or
    mental health of the mother, a risk to her life, or in the case of foetal abnormality. In most cases, it is the danger to the mother's psychological health that is used as grounds for the termination. Two doctors must agree before a termination can be offered.

    This is dangerous ground. Your "opinion" on the matter if termination is irrelevant and should not come into it. You had a duty as a doctor to offer the procedure if a woman presents and it is clinically indicated. Be very wary of allowing your personal beliefs to influence your clinical decision making in a scenario like this (unless you are exercising your preserved right not to be involved in terminations at all, in which case you should refer the patient to another practitioner who will offer the procedure).

    Plus, for those of you who have not had babies (I myself have had two) bear in mind that at 24ish weeks the termination takes place by induction of labour. That is to say, the mother has to give birth with everything that entails.



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    (Original post by mynameisntbobk)
    Question:
    What makes a good doctor?
    When two people love each other very much, they have a special cuddle. About 24 years later the result sometimes graduates from medical school....


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    (Original post by Pittawithcheese)
    When two people love each other very much, they have a special cuddle. About 24 years later the result sometimes graduates from medical school....


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    I love it

    Pittawithcheese, your answers to previous threads are awesome. If you talk how you write you definitely won't have a problem on interview day. I wish I had the knowledge to formulate answers like you. Best of luck x
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    I'm not too sure on this but if a 15 year old patient comes in to your GP asking for termination of pregnancy but you deem her not competent do you inform parents? According to the 150 Interview questions book you must inform her parents if she is not Fraser competent. But I thought confidentiality can only be breached if there is serious harm to her, third party of on request of police/court?

    So what do you do in this situation?




    Edit: Also what about in the case of child under 13 years of age who is considered unable to consent?
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    try this www.nhs.uk/news/Pages/NewsIndex.aspx it's good because it highlights the important stories (although not always the interesting ones) and is quite analytical of the stories and the science behind them.
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    (Original post by Pittawithcheese)
    When two people love each other very much, they have a special cuddle. About 24 years later the result sometimes graduates from medical school....


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    :rofl:
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    (Original post by Pittawithcheese)
    In England, Wales and Scotland, termination is permitted at any stage of pregnancy on the grounds of foetal abnormality. A colleague of
    mine terminated a much wanted baby at 27 weeks for this reason. The law in Ireland is different.

    Firstly, it is best not to use the word abortion. This word is usually used by the prolife lobby and is this quite a strong term. Better to stick with the medical term, "termination".

    If you are going to discuss issues such as termination then it would be a good idea to brush-up on the law. For example, termination in the UK is not an absolute right. It is ONLY permitted if continuance of the pregnancy would pose a risk of injury to the physical or
    mental health of the mother, a risk to her life, or in the case of foetal abnormality. In most cases, it is the danger to the mother's psychological health that is used as grounds for the termination. Two doctors must agree before a termination can be offered.

    This is dangerous ground. Your "opinion" on the matter if termination is irrelevant and should not come into it. You had a duty as a doctor to offer the procedure if a woman presents and it is clinically indicated. Be very wary of allowing your personal beliefs to influence your clinical decision making in a scenario like this (unless you are exercising your preserved right not to be involved in terminations at all, in which case you should refer the patient to another practitioner who will offer the procedure).

    Plus, for those of you who have not had babies (I myself have had two) bear in mind that at 24ish weeks the termination takes place by induction of labour. That is to say, the mother has to give birth with everything that entails.



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    Hey thank you for highlighting that :thumbsup:
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    Under what circumstances is it ok (if ever) to withhold illness information from a patient?
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    (Original post by prafto)
    Under what circumstances is it ok (if ever) to withhold illness information from a patient?
    If it causes serious psychological harm I believe. It won't be in their best interests but I would expect to state why I withheld the information in the notes otherwise it could get messy in court if I were to justify it.
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    Another question.

    "You are working on a group project with 5 other students. One of the students doesn't show up for meetings or if they do show up- they are late and leave early. They have put no effort into the group project but show up on the day of the presentation and try to take credit for the project. What do you do in this situation?"
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    (Original post by Joannywhite)
    Another question.

    "You are working on a group project with 5 other students. One of the students doesn't show up for meetings or if they do show up- they are late and leave early. They have put no effort into the group project but show up on the day of the presentation and try to take credit for the project. What do you do in this situation?"
    It's important not to make any pre-determined judgements and view the picture in its initial appearance. There may be more to this and thus, it is important to have an attempt to understand the reason behind his constant lateness or his irrational desire to take the credit of a project he didn't contribute in. It may well be due to personal problems or it may even be medical/psychological, whatever the problem is, it is important to acknowledge that there is a potential of this of occurring.
    This attitude of empathising with your team member would lead to effective communication. Communication is ever so important whilst working within a team, and it also applies in this predicament. This act would allow you to delve into the reasons behind this. Be honest with him and emphasise the hard work that has been put in by others, in a subtle manner. He may change his mind by this moment, and the credit would be given to those who deserve it, which would only be fair. If he doesn't change his mind, I wouldn't (personally) really be in a position to argue and force him to step down. To prevent further high tensed moments, I'd leave him take the credit instead of being adamant, and maybe follow it up further some time in the near future.
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    (Original post by frogs r everywhere)
    It's important not to make any pre-determined judgements and view the picture in its initial appearance. There may be more to this and thus, it is important to have an attempt to understand the reason behind his constant lateness or his irrational desire to take the credit of a project he didn't contribute in. It may well be due to personal problems or it may even be medical/psychological, whatever the problem is, it is important to acknowledge that there is a potential of this of occurring.
    This attitude of empathising with your team member would lead to effective communication. Communication is ever so important whilst working within a team, and it also applies in this predicament. This act would allow you to delve into the reasons behind this. Be honest with him and emphasise the hard work that has been put in by others, in a subtle manner. He may change his mind by this moment, and the credit would be given to those who deserve it, which would only be fair. If he doesn't change his mind, I wouldn't (personally) really be in a position to argue and force him to step down. To prevent further high tensed moments, I'd leave him take the credit instead of being adamant, and maybe follow it up further some time in the near future.

    Yeah I agree with this, it wouldn't be appropriate to say right away that he hasn't contributed to anything which may cause further problems especially if it is, for example, in front of an audience. It would be better to follow up on it some other time but I'm not sure what I'd do after following up on it, would it be best to go to a teacher and tell them? Or after determining the reasons, as long as the rest of the team is happy to do so, to ignore it this time? What if someone isn't happy with them taking credit?

    Opens up even more questions
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    (Original post by HHaris14)
    I love it

    Pittawithcheese, your answers to previous threads are awesome. If you talk how you write you definitely won't have a problem on interview day. I wish I had the knowledge to formulate answers like you. Best of luck x
    I am very flattered. That is most kind of you...


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    (Original post by Secret.)
    I'm not too sure on this but if a 15 year old patient comes in to your GP asking for termination of pregnancy but you deem her not competent do you inform parents? According to the 150 Interview questions book you must inform her parents if she is not Fraser competent. But I thought confidentiality can only be breached if there is serious harm to her, third party of on request of police/court?

    So what do you do in this situation?




    Edit: Also what about in the case of child under 13 years of age who is considered unable to consent?
    I believe you can avoid breaching confidentiality (and this withhold information from parents) but still maintain your obligation to share information under safeguarding protocols (that is to say, letting social services know).

    Also, remember that the girl in question may be in care, and so for "parents" you can substitute foster career or social worker.

    The bug issue about her age and the fact that she is pregnant. If the father is the same age as her (circa 13yrs) it's not such a bug issue as if the dad is, say, 21.....


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    (Original post by richtea5)
    try this www.nhs.uk/news/Pages/NewsIndex.aspx it's good because it highlights the important stories (although not always the interesting ones) and is quite analytical of the stories and the science behind them.
    Thanks for that


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    i got rejected from cardiff btw 3 days ago
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    Can anyone help me? I've sent off my application for Medicine, but i have got an interview for Biomedical Science, my back up option at Manchester.
    Would the interview layout be similar, or can anyone give me advice on what they might ask?
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    (Original post by ocelot92)
    i got rejected from cardiff btw 3 days ago
    sorry 2 hear

    how many a*s did you have?
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    "What makes a good team player?"
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    (Original post by Joannywhite)
    "What makes a good team player?"
    You seem to be asking a lot of questions but not answering them...

    Maybe you can include your own answer in a spoiler..
 
 
 
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