Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

New maths and further maths A Levels Watch

Announcements
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by newblood)
    DO you guys or anyone else for that matter have access to an S-Level (further?) maths paper that you could perhaps upload. I believe I have the 1970 and 1962 ones ... 1970 special paper and 1962 scholarship paper....do they mean S-Levels do you think?
    special is
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by newblood)
    DO you guys or anyone else for that matter have access to an S-Level (further?) maths paper that you could perhaps upload. I believe I have the 1970 and 1962 ones ... 1970 special paper and 1962 scholarship paper....do they mean S-Levels do you think?
    I've got some JMB papers from the 70s and 80s. I'll consult my IT technician, aka husband, about uploading them.

    Graham from Edexcel has some London board ones in his Emporium. If you look in A level pre-2000, you'll find special papers in the A level cabinets for June 1988, for instance.
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    13
    (Original post by newblood)
    DO you guys or anyone else for that matter have access to an S-Level (further?) maths paper that you could perhaps upload.
    Nope, sorry.
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by newblood)
    DO you guys or anyone else for that matter have access to an S-Level (further?) maths paper that you could perhaps upload. I believe I have the 1970 and 1962 ones ... 1970 special paper and 1962 scholarship paper....do they mean S-Levels do you think?
    I personally don't, but I know there are some knocking around on the internet - see other posters' replies to your question!

    Actually my board (SMP) didn't run an S Level Further Maths paper which I always thought was unfortunate - I did their S Level Maths Paper and S Level Physics via another board (AEB I think).

    Depending on whom you ask, S Levels either referred to "Special Papers" or "Scholarship Papers". Exam boards used to have a bit more freedom than today - e.g. traditional Maths A level (e.g. AEB, JMB, Oxford Local) was "Maths with Stats" or "Maths with Mechanics", whereas for SMP we covered both Mechanics and Stats. The Mechanics was heavily vector-based, which was great preparation for the Maths Tripos but ironically less use as preparation for the Cambridge entrance exam!

    Also boards used different terminology for their grades - I think one of my boards graded the S level as Distinction, Merit, Unclassified whereas the other one just went 1, 2, Unclassified,
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by davros)
    I personally don't, but I know there are some knocking around on the internet - see other posters' replies to your question!

    Actually my board (SMP) didn't run an S Level Further Maths paper which I always thought was unfortunate - I did their S Level Maths Paper and S Level Physics via another board (AEB I think).

    Depending on whom you ask, S Levels either referred to "Special Papers" or "Scholarship Papers". Exam boards used to have a bit more freedom than today - e.g. traditional Maths A level (e.g. AEB, JMB, Oxford Local) was "Maths with Stats" or "Maths with Mechanics", whereas for SMP we covered both Mechanics and Stats. The Mechanics was heavily vector-based, which was great preparation for the Maths Tripos but ironically less use as preparation for the Cambridge entrance exam!

    Also boards used different terminology for their grades - I think one of my boards graded the S level as Distinction, Merit, Unclassified whereas the other one just went 1, 2, Unclassified,
    There never actually was an S level. That was a nickname for what was originally called the Scholarship Paper and later the Special Paper of an A level. The so called S level was always part of the A level and certainly when I sat it was necessary to achieve a B at A level to gain an S level classification which was reported on an A level certificate.

    You mention SMP. SMP wasn't a board. It was a syllabus offered by AEB and possibly other exam boards (it may have been exclusive to AEB because the Schools Mathematics Project was based in Nottingham and Nottingham was in the AEB heartland) as an alternative to their ordinary syllabus. I did O level SMP maths but I have an AEB certificate for it. As I saw it at the time, the principal difference was that SMP used 3 figure rather than 4 figure log tables!


    The way standard AEB maths A levels worked was that there were 4 strands, pure, mechanics, statistics and, I think, computation. Single mathematicians did paper 1 of pure and paper 1 of one of the other three. Double mathematicians did papers 1 and 2 of pure and papers 1 and 2 of one of the other three. That gave them two A levels.

    The AEB also offered an AO in maths of a standard between O level and A level.



    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    There never actually was an S level. That was a nickname for what was originally called the Scholarship Paper and later the Special Paper of an A level. The so called S level was always part of the A level and certainly when I sat it was necessary to achieve a B at A level to gain an S level classification which was reported on an A level certificate.

    You mention SMP. SMP wasn't a board. It was a syllabus offered by AEB and possibly other exam boards (it may have been exclusive to AEB because the Schools Mathematics Project was based in Nottingham and Nottingham was in the AEB heartland) as an alternative to their ordinary syllabus. I did O level SMP maths but I have an AEB certificate for it. As I saw it at the time, the principal difference was that SMP used 3 figure rather than 4 figure log tables!


    The way standard AEB maths A levels worked was that there were 4 strands, pure, mechanics, statistics and, I think, computation. Single mathematicians did paper 1 of pure and paper 1 of one of the other three. Double mathematicians did papers 1 and 2 of pure and papers 1 and 2 of one of the other three. That gave them two A levels.

    The AEB also offered an AO in maths of a standard between O level and A level.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Thanks for the extra info.

    I'd never really taken in before that SMP wasn't actually an exam board in its own right, but you're absolutely right - my SMP exam results appear with other subjects on my Oxford University Local Delegacy of Examinations certificate!

    I remember there were various strange rules about S levels such as: you could only sit an S level at the time of the corresponding A level; and I think you could sit no more than 2 in one summer!

    My Oxford Local certificate impressively reports my SMP A level grade accompanied by the phrase "with Distinction in the Special Paper" whereas my AEB certificate just says "Physics A1" which seems a bit bland by comparison

    I did the SMP AO level in mathematics (again reported under Oxford Local) - I always assumed there were other Additional Mathematics qualifications available under other boards but I can't remember.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by davros)
    Thanks for the extra info.

    I'd never really taken in before that SMP wasn't actually an exam board in its own right, but you're absolutely right - my SMP exam results appear with other subjects on my Oxford University Local Delegacy of Examinations certificate!

    I remember there were various strange rules about S levels such as: you could only sit an S level at the time of the corresponding A level; and I think you could sit no more than 2 in one summer!

    My Oxford Local certificate impressively reports my SMP A level grade accompanied by the phrase "with Distinction in the Special Paper" whereas my AEB certificate just says "Physics A1" which seems a bit bland by comparison

    I did the SMP AO level in mathematics (again reported under Oxford Local) - I always assumed there were other Additional Mathematics qualifications available under other boards but I can't remember.
    I taught JMB AO in 1987.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by davros)
    I remember there were various strange rules about S levels such as: you could only sit an S level at the time of the corresponding A level; and I think you could sit no more than 2 in one summer!
    When I did them, the examining board (London) managed to schedule Maths and FM at the same time, which seems a bit odd as you'd think a lot of people would want to take both.

    Like you I also did Physics, but that was a year after M/FM, so I never did 3 in one year.

    Did you ever see any of the other subjects? I saw an S-level English paper and it was pretty cool - very wide range of essay topics, some poetry to analyze etc.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tiny hobbit)
    I've got some JMB papers from the 70s and 80s. I'll consult my IT technician, aka husband, about uploading them.

    Graham from Edexcel has some London board ones in his Emporium. If you look in A level pre-2000, you'll find special papers in the A level cabinets for June 1988, for instance.
    With the condition that they should not be widely distributed
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TenOfThem)
    With the condition that they should not be widely distributed
    We couldn't get them even if we wanted to; the site is only open to teachers.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shamika)
    We couldn't get them even if we wanted to; the site is only open to teachers.
    Tiny Hobbit is a teacher
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shamika)
    We couldn't get them even if we wanted to; the site is only open to teachers.

    (Original post by TenOfThem)
    Tiny Hobbit is a teacher
    ...which is why I managed to track them down, lurking in the A level papers cabinet.

    I had assumed that any one keen (or sad) enough to want ancient papers would be a teacher.

    On a similar theme, I thought that this year's AEA paper had some cracking questions - I've just worked through it this afternoon.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TenOfThem)
    Tiny Hobbit is a teacher
    No longer!
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TenOfThem)
    Tiny Hobbit is a teacher
    I did know that; my point was that I couldn't, because I, not a teacher, and others on this thread aren't teachers either.

    (Original post by tiny hobbit)
    No longer!
    Best of luck with whatever you're doing next
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tiny hobbit)
    ...which is why I managed to track them down, lurking in the A level papers cabinet.

    I had assumed that any one keen (or sad) enough to want ancient papers would be a teacher.

    On a similar theme, I thought that this year's AEA paper had some cracking questions - I've just worked through it this afternoon.
    Where did you find it? I would love to have a go at it
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DFranklin)
    Did you ever see any of the other subjects? I saw an S-level English paper and it was pretty cool - very wide range of essay topics, some poetry to analyze etc.
    I probably skimmed through some in a big book of bound exam papers but don't remember any specifics.

    I remember for my S level Physics I went to town on a question that was basically "write an essay on resonance" because I'd just read a load of stuff on it that was outside the curriculum.

    I did A level French and while I wasn't brave enough to attempt the S level for real I did a couple of translation exercises from a book that were S level standard. The first one required you to translate a passage into French beginning with the memorable phrase "The road meandered between hedges fragrant with honeysuckle."
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shamika)
    I did know that; my point was that I couldn't, because I, not a teacher, and others on this thread aren't teachers either.
    Sure - but I do not know why the comment was aimed at me - I was just pointing out to Tiny Hobbit that they were not for general distribution
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TenOfThem)
    Sure - but I do not know why the comment was aimed at me - I was just pointing out to Tiny Hobbit that they were not for general distribution
    Noted. I have to say, though, that I don't seem the harm in sharing papers from 26 years ago.

    I agree that it's a pain that papers from this summer are freely available on TSR as well as on many other websites, rather than being kept secure to be used as mocks.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tiny hobbit)
    Noted. I have to say, though, that I don't seem the harm in sharing papers from 26 years ago.
    I agree to be honest

    When the question was asked I went straight to the emporium to get a paper - but realised that the constraint was for all materials
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mr M)
    New maths and further maths A Levels are being introduced for first teaching from September 2016.

    Click to read the new content for maths and further maths.

    These should be read in conjunction with the report from ALCAB.

    Decision maths is dead. Exams are longer and less structured. There is no module choice in A Level. There is little choice in FM. Coursework is gone.
    This doesn't affect the current Edexcel exams right sir?
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
    Useful resources

    Make your revision easier

    Maths

    Maths Forum posting guidelines

    Not sure where to post? Read the updated guidelines here

    Equations

    How to use LaTex

    Writing equations the easy way

    Student revising

    Study habits of A* students

    Top tips from students who have already aced their exams

    Study Planner

    Create your own Study Planner

    Never miss a deadline again

    Polling station sign

    Thinking about a maths degree?

    Chat with other maths applicants

    Can you help? Study help unanswered threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.