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    (Original post by Anonynmous)
    Aggressive paper-chasing - Isn't that why people go for investment banking/Asset Manager route?
    Yes, and it's very worrying exactly how many people on TSR want to go down that route, tbh.
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    (Original post by frankieboy)
    Yes, and it's very worrying exactly how many people on TSR want to go down that route, tbh.
    Because there isn't really any other route that is feasible for the vast majority of students to make bank.
    (Aside Corporate law to an extent)

    I'm guilty following the crowd, but it will pay off in the long term.
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    (Original post by Anonynmous)
    Because there isn't really any other route that is feasible for the vast majority of students to make bank.
    The obsession with ''Making bank'' is exactly what I'm talking about.
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    (Original post by frankieboy)
    The obsession with ''Making bank'' is exactly what I'm talking about.
    What's the problem with someone having the desire to make bank?

    If people want to make bank then so be it. Heck, I even encourage it - bring down the wealth gap.

    However, personally I wouldn't be against someone doing something because it's their "passion" and or money is not an "issue" for them.
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    (Original post by frankieboy)
    Yes, and it's very worrying exactly how many people on TSR want to go down that route, tbh.
    To be fair to the guy, he's got 4 investment banking internships under his belt (I think - lost count) and he's only in first year of university. And he comes from a poor background, if anyone can make it work, it's him.

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    (Original post by Anonynmous)
    Because there isn't really any other route that is feasible for the vast majority of students to make bank.
    (Aside Corporate law to an extent)

    I'm guilty following the crowd, but it will pay off in the long term.
    To be fair, in London & South East, they are pretty much the only careers that allow you to live the same lifestyles generations before us had because of crazy house prices, education costs, utility costs, transport costs etc.

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    (Original post by will2348)
    To be fair, in London & South East, they are pretty much the only careers that allow you to live the same lifestyles generations before us had because of crazy house prices, education costs, utility costs, transport costs etc.

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    Agreed.
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    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    I really find it hard to understand why people go for low paid jobs when they seem to have the intellectual capability to aim for industries which are relatively well-paid.

    I see students who have the credentials and the profile potential to enter industries such as law, investment banking being etc.. but instead choose to go into places such as teaching. Are they just lazy?

    So if you do intend to get out of bed for a job that pays less than £50k a year and you're smart (i.e flawless grades/credible uni/strong ECs), why? what's your motivation?

    inb4, "it's my passion".
    I don't see why you're complaining about people entering the teaching sector.. Someone needs to teach A-levels.. Someone needs to teach the modules on your degree.. Similarly someone needs to teach GCSEs?

    Smart doesn't necessarily mean you'll have a good pay.. See plenty of 'thickos' with low grades, jail sentences, and poor universities, with well paid jobs.. Just because you can get a 2:1 or a first class in the respective field, it doesn't mean you'll be successful in the field. An examination is completely different from what you'll get in real life. It's this whole automatic entitlement attitude that aggravates me.
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    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    This statement is generally reserved for one of two categories of individuals: The underclass and those who have under-performed in formal education.
    Actually that's not true. Statistically speaking, those with greater wealth ranked much lower for lifetime happiness versus "underclass" individuals. Money may buy short time happiness, but apparently not life long fulfillment.

    Personally, I'll be 25 in April and I've had great paying jobs in the corporate sector. But I was working 60+ hrs a week doing something I didn't enjoy, but was good at, and with people I didn't like.

    As someone who's finally full-stop pursuing their passion, it's because I realized I was never happier than when I was doing something I loved and saw positive results with enough money to have what I needed and some of what I wanted versus an abundance of income for things I wanted, with no time to enjoy them.

    Just MHO.
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    (Original post by will2348)
    To be fair, in London & South East, they are pretty much the only careers that allow you to live the same lifestyles generations before us had because of crazy house prices, education costs, utility costs, transport costs etc.

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    They are far from the only way. The only people I know who make over £100k a year are self employed. One is a builder who has got into property development, one has a wholesaling business and the other has a plumbing and heating business.

    I think generally, if you look at the people who have the amounts of money we are talking about in this thread and haven't just inherited it, the vast majority are self employed or run their own businesses. There just aren't that many investment bankers/traders/corporate lawyers.

    If your sole aim is just to make as much money as possible, the best bet is to position yourself to go down the entrepreneurship route with something that either has a pretty sure chance of making a decent income with the potential for scalability (e.g. a trade where you will be able to find work for yourself but with the opportunity to go self employed, get bigger contracts and take on staff) or focus your efforts on setting up some business alongside going to uni or getting into some job where you will get experience/training that you can fall back on if your business ideas don't pan out.

    I think the reason that people on here are ignoring this and concentrating on banking and corporate law as the only way to make serious money is because the path into it is so much more formalised and easier to understand. That maybe so but at the same time it strikes me as being more unlikely and less imaginative.
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    The jobs that offer the highest salaries around do so because they really do get a lot out of you. You have to sacrifice quality time with family and friends. A job in a high paying career such as investment banking means you are essentially saying bye-bye to any real sort of social life with the 15 hour working days. Even Aldi's graduate scheme, graduates are offered so much (£40l+, Audi A4 etc) because their life will have to revolve around their work. I have seen this first hand. But what good is having all this money if you struggle to even find time to spend it. For many, accepting a lower salary is worth having a good work/life balance.
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    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    x
    I don't know what should I do with an abundance of money. Don't like my family, are not interest in travelling and status symbols. In short: I am humble.
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    jheez I PUT IN THE WORK ALL DAY I PUT IN THE WORK ALL DAY DEM MAN ARE DOING THIS TING PART TIME NO IM DOING THIS TING ALL DAY
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    (Original post by fbrep2012)
    The jobs that offer the highest salaries around do so because they really do get a lot out of you. You have to sacrifice quality time with family and friends. A job in a high paying career such as investment banking means you are essentially saying bye-bye to any real sort of social life with the 15 hour working days. Even Aldi's graduate scheme, graduates are offered so much (£40l+, Audi A4 etc) because their life will have to revolve around their work. I have seen this first hand. But what good is having all this money if you struggle to even find time to spend it. For many, accepting a lower salary is worth having a good work/life balance.
    I absolutely agree with you but the thing that gets to me is when people choose the work/life balance route with lower pay but then later in life, start moaning about people who earn a lot more than them, despite making the sacrifices.

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    (Original post by Logolept)
    jheez I PUT IN THE WORK ALL DAY I PUT IN THE WORK ALL DAY DEM MAN ARE DOING THIS TING PART TIME NO IM DOING THIS TING ALL DAY
    Yes fam! You know like that! Money over everything :lol:

    Gang ****, no part-timers round here, we dont speak to feds, got a younger that'll bun him out leave him dead.
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    (Original post by Binary Freak)
    (...) An examination is completely different from what you'll get in real life. It's this whole automatic entitlement attitude that aggravates me.
    You have spoken true words. And I understand your aggravation. I have the same view.
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    (Original post by Anonynmous)
    What's the problem with someone having the desire to make bank?
    There's nothing wrong with it, per se, but it is a pretty unrealistic expectation, I think these people are in for a big shock, the reasons to which have been described in the above posts. I think it's bandwagon jumping which could be, and has been, very bad for this Country both in terms of economy and in terms of culture.

    (Original post by will2348)
    To be fair, in London & South East, they are pretty much the only careers that allow you to live the same lifestyles generations before us had because of crazy house prices, education costs, utility costs, transport costs etc.
    The ''lifestyles'' (are you talking about material possessions?) that those generations lived were :
    1 : Probably not half as glamorous as you think and
    2 : Are being paid for very heavily by this generation. If you choose to live the same lifestyle, then future generations will have to pay for that.

    What lifestyles were you referring to?
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    (Original post by frankieboy)

    The ''lifestyles'' (are you talking about material possessions?) that those generations lived were :
    1 : Probably not half as glamorous as you think and
    2 : Are being paid for very heavily by this generation. If you choose to live the same lifestyle, then future generations will have to pay for that.

    What lifestyles were you referring to?
    To be honest just a fairly normal slightly above average lifestyle.

    For example, my uncle has a quite nice house in London Zone 6 (so about 25 miles from the centre), 4 bedroom detached on a main road (not that glamorous?) and a probably slightly more than average expensive car with wife (paid for wedding) and three kids. He had all this at 30 and he was not earning anything what most people would consider a very high salary - maybe 40-50k, if that. And now he also has another similar house and more cars - again nothing much has changed for him salary wise.

    But to achieve that today in the same timescale, you'd need to be on a very, very high salary. I mean to get a mortgage for the house alone you'd need to be on at least £150,000. He bought it for £180,000, it is now worth just under £1,000,000 just 20 years later.

    So I'm not referring to anything special, just a normal middle class lifestyle. I think most people our age are in for a shock when they start working and suddenly realise what they thought was a good salary, actually goes nowhere at all - I mean, barely covering the basics if you have a family.

    What I'm saying is in the past an above average salary (banker, lawyer, accountant etc.) would get you an above average lifestyle. Today, an above average salary gets you a normal lifestyle. And an average salary gets you the basics.

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    To keep it real. And yes, I want to go into teaching to give something back.
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    (Original post by fbrep2012)
    The jobs that offer the highest salaries around do so because they really do get a lot out of you. You have to sacrifice quality time with family and friends. A job in a high paying career such as investment banking means you are essentially saying bye-bye to any real sort of social life with the 15 hour working days. Even Aldi's graduate scheme, graduates are offered so much (£40l+, Audi A4 etc) because their life will have to revolve around their work. I have seen this first hand. But what good is having all this money if you struggle to even find time to spend it. For many, accepting a lower salary is worth having a good work/life balance.
    Some sense in this, but there seems to be a recurring theme in this thread where people deduce that working hard / demanding responsibilities / long hours automatically equates to a bad job that's only worth doing for the pay check. This isn't the case. Many people would prefer to have a mentally challenging role that offers responsibility and development, regardless of the salary.

    Going back to the OPs rather arrogantly worded post, the obvious answer is that you'd have to be stupid to spend the bulk of your time for the majority of your adult life doing something you dislike just so you can have a few extra bedrooms and a flashier 2 week holiday. Of course if you enjoy a well paying job, easy win.
 
 
 
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