why do A-Level Students Look Down on BTEC's? Watch

Async
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#281
(Original post by Thahleel)
Programmers are stereotyped for not liking or reading books and it holds true for me aswell, if the book isn't full of problems and formulae, I won't enjoy reading it. That's why I recommended YouTube, there is also online learning applications like MOOCs and Lynda.com that the person can explore if they really think YouTube is that bad.

Sure universities will not spoon feed you, but I know many a programmer who didn't even know what hello world was before university and can now write extensive back end programming tools (for a living), and of course university will not show you everything you need to know, but I disagree in the sense that they do show you advanced concepts, and don't just stick to the basics. They assume that you'll be curious and interested and go away and write projects in your own time based on what you've learnt. I think that someone even interested in learning programming will be curious and will want to create their own projects, whereas someone who's only doing it because it's on the course isn't going to get far.

Computer Science degrees usually have those maths modules full of abstract algebra and logic concepts, and IMO that isn't chilling, as the calibre of maths in those modules goes above and beyond anything learnt at A Level. But generally for programming you're sorted if you have prior experience.
Yup well said. Me too, reading isn't on my list of things I like to do. I only read when it's programming related or when I have to pass an exam.

But yeah I also agree with that guy that didn't know hello world and can now code. That reminds me a bit of myself in way. I went to college having 0 knowledge of programming and just under 2 years I've learnt more than I thought was possibly in such a small time scale and become addicted to programming. I now run a freelance programming service.

You seem like you know your stuff, you'd really benefit financially from offering a programming service. You should try it whilst at uni. You sound like you know your way around code so you could do that for 1st yr of uni.
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Computer Geek
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(Original post by yt7777)
Yeah its Java, we also did games programming using Python and a bit of Assembly using the MIPS processor and its a ***** to try to understand, also I did a bit of Assembly on my BTEC, did you do unit 19?

Fair enough, that's quite convenient having such a good uni close by I guess.

Yeah the module is called "Systems Programming" so it will be dealing with lower level tasks.

Wow, incredible grades, yeah fair enough, still really good though.
Yeah that's standard to what a normal university does now a days. Yeah I did my assembly with my Raspberry Pi, just getting it to do factorial calculations and read stuff into registers. I would never want to write an entire program in ASM, that would be hell haha. Oh yeah I remember that, the architecture module, that's similar to a module that I'm going to be doing next year haha, the assembly in that was quite basic, and my teacher walked everyone through it before letting us loose haha. It was a lot less stressful than the Assembly I've done on my own.

You live in Hampshire, Southampton University is world known for Computer Science and Electronics, I'd probably have gone there if it was 3 hours in a car away haha.

Thanks.
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(Original post by Async)
Yup well said. Me too, reading isn't on my list of things I like to do. I only read when it's programming related or when I have to pass an exam.

But yeah I also agree with that guy that didn't know hello world and can now code. That reminds me a bit of myself in way. I went to college having 0 knowledge of programming and just under 2 years I've learnt more than I thought was possibly in such a small time scale and become addicted to programming. I now run a freelance programming service.

You seem like you know your stuff, you'd really benefit financially from offering a programming service. You should try it whilst at uni. You sound like you know your way around code so you could do that for 1st yr of uni.
Haha, it's a trait that all computer scientists share I think. Yeah back in college I would have to read through all that outdated naff about computers for my Computing and IT A Levels and I didn't enjoy it but still got through it.

Yeah I ain't a programming prodigy, like some people I know start programming when they're like 10, and I only started programming in late year 10, so it wasn't like I was born for this, I just worked really hard at it. I am also a programming addict and I'm currently on a gap year, and I've just been working on paid projects for people (mainly MIS and booking systems for small businesses, but one guy wanted a interactive GUI front end to run on his smartphone and that was fun programming).

Yeah I'm going to see if I don't fall behind on the maths and other stuff at university about offering programming services, and possibly like technology consulting, would look ace on my CV.
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yt7777
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(Original post by Thahleel)
Yeah that's standard to what a normal university does now a days. Yeah I did my assembly with my Raspberry Pi, just getting it to do factorial calculations and read stuff into registers. I would never want to write an entire program in ASM, that would be hell haha. Oh yeah I remember that, the architecture module, that's similar to a module that I'm going to be doing next year haha, the assembly in that was quite basic, and my teacher walked everyone through it before letting us loose haha. It was a lot less stressful than the Assembly I've done on my own.

You live in Hampshire, Southampton University is world known for Computer Science and Electronics, I'd probably have gone there if it was 3 hours in a car away haha.

Thanks.
Yeah it was a good unit, pretty similar to one of mine that I have just done too :P

Yeah Southampton is really good, I wanted to go there but they required an A in Maths, I was tempted to apply for BSc IT in Organisations and take as many CS modules as possible but CBA I wanted to do full CS.
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Async
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(Original post by Thahleel)
Haha, it's a trait that all computer scientists share I think. Yeah back in college I would have to read through all that outdated naff about computers for my Computing and IT A Levels and I didn't enjoy it but still got through it.

Yeah I ain't a programming prodigy, like some people I know start programming when they're like 10, and I only started programming in late year 10, so it wasn't like I was born for this, I just worked really hard at it. I am also a programming addict and I'm currently on a gap year, and I've just been working on paid projects for people (mainly MIS and booking systems for small businesses, but one guy wanted a interactive GUI front end to run on his smartphone and that was fun programming).

Yeah I'm going to see if I don't fall behind on the maths and other stuff at university about offering programming services, and possibly like technology consulting, would look ace on my CV.
I envy those that started at a younger age. I wish I had that sense of direction in my life at that age. I wouldn't of made the mistakes of not having a sense of direction let to wrong choices.

Working on projects like that for people sounds like lots of fun. Mine is mainly over the Internet with people across the world that I'd never meet.

Anyway Goodluck with your future prospects.
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(Original post by yt7777)
Yeah it was a good unit, pretty similar to one of mine that I have just done too :P

Yeah Southampton is really good, I wanted to go there but they required an A in Maths, I was tempted to apply for BSc IT in Organisations and take as many CS modules as possible but CBA I wanted to do full CS.
Yeah Southampton was one of the universities that persuaded me to do my A Levels, I found out that the top universities that I wanted to go to, all wanted AL Maths, and tbh it woulda been slightly ridiculous going university at 16 haha.

Yeah good on you, I wouldn't recommend that ITO programme, it's got a lot of boring modules in it. Also it wouldn't give you the accreditation that a Computer Science degree would.
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yt7777
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(Original post by Thahleel)
Yeah Southampton was one of the universities that persuaded me to do my A Levels, I found out that the top universities that I wanted to go to, all wanted AL Maths, and tbh it woulda been slightly ridiculous going university at 16 haha.

Yeah good on you, I wouldn't recommend that ITO programme, it's got a lot of boring modules in it. Also it wouldn't give you the accreditation that a Computer Science degree would.
haha yeah, would have been cool to be a graduate at 19 though haha :P

yeah some of the business modules look really dull :P
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(Original post by yt7777)
haha yeah, would have been cool to be a graduate at 19 though haha :P

yeah some of the business modules look really dull :P
Yeah I know someone who did Physics degree after taking his A Levels at 16, he told me social life had to take a back seat and he generally didn't enjoy his life afterwards, the normal age for all this is fine. Like I'm 19 now, and I don't have a degree, but I've enjoyed my life a lot more than if I did have one.

I hope Warwick doesn't pile any of those on me, I just want Maths or Programming or Theory modules.
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Mitzi_Holley
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(Original post by Ryanx623)
I get that with certain courses, Health + Social care for example are complete knobs, However courses like Engineering are filled with A-level capable students...
Ok, try and get an extended diploma in Health and Social care at D*D*D* and then express your small minded views. Until then, shut up.


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coconuthead--
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(Original post by Binary Freak)
Was that meant to be funny?
Btec b4nterr

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(Original post by ohhello92x)
I've never done A-levels, I've done a level 3 BTEC and managed to get into university
I think A-level students think they feel the need to feel superior over the BTEC students
And there ARE able students who do BTEC, but I think there are students, like myself who prefer coursework over exams, or the course they want to do is a BTEC, so have to do it as a BTEC anyway


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What uni did ypu get to?

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UT97
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(Original post by lisamb)
Sorry but I'm afraid you didn't read correctly! A-Levels suit people wanted to study "academic" subjects, and BTEC is for vocational study. However the word vocational can be quite misleading as it suggests a non-academic approach. I would like to discount that as I have personal experience studying a extended diploma in health and social care where I am constantly using academic skills. Writing lengthy reports and essays are almost second nature now, it's only considered vocational as I am applying knowledge to care. Its definitely equivalent to A-Levels! I hope that clears up some confusion
I wasnt disputing any of that, i was just saying that you made an oversimplification somewhere in your previous paragraph which applied to me (cant remember what it was) so i was just showing my situation in order to make a point. My personal view is that A levels are right for some, Btecs are right for others. Some btecs are not respected, some A levels are not respected. At the end of the day people need to do what's best for them
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ohhello92x
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(Original post by coconuthead--)
What uni did ypu get to?

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Buckinghamshire new university


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Binary Freak
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(Original post by billyfisher100)
Yes. Accurate also.
You should be aware that makes them far more employable than you? Alongside more experienced?

If we want to be realistic you might want to be aware that a vast majority of people that serve you at fast food restaurants and places alike are A-level students studying part-time. I could equally say the same regarding A-level students.

The lack of thought you put into that 'meme' is incredible. Least to say laughable.
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username1229433
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At the end of the day, everyone is going to be in the same class whether they did A-Levels or B-Tec.


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Sandra1
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I don't even understand everyone should be grateful that you are at least getting an education a level or btec.If the a level people are sooo smart they should be grateful that they are so many ways of getting educated some people in less fortunate countries don't even get the choice of even to study a btec ... a levels ...access course.


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sarahlimonx
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Not too sure where you have formed this deluded idea because I am on track to achieve D*D*D* on my BTEC in Health Care and recieved an offer at a Russell Group University.

I have studied 4 AS levels previously and actually hated how little content they covered. They taught me to write an exam, not how to apply the knowledge.

But please, do go on to tell me how A Levels are better than a BTEC and that I must be dumb for studying a BTEC in Health and Social because I want to be a nurse 😊😊


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physicsmaths
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(Original post by sarahlimonx)
Not too sure where you have formed this deluded idea because I am on track to achieve D*D*D* on my BTEC in Health Care and recieved an offer at a Russell Group University.

I have studied 4 AS levels previously and actually hated how little content they covered. They taught me to write an exam, not how to apply the knowledge.

But please, do go on to tell me how A Levels are better than a BTEC and that I must be dumb for studying a BTEC in Health and Social because I want to be a nurse 😊😊


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A levels are better the BTEC, you said 'tell me'.


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Binary Freak
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(Original post by physicsmaths)
A levels are better the BTEC, you said 'tell me'.


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Tell her how.

Evidently your reading skills aren't up to par.
(Original post by sarahlimonx)
Not too sure where you have formed this deluded idea because I am on track to achieve D*D*D* on my BTEC in Health Care and recieved an offer at a Russell Group University.

I have studied 4 AS levels previously and actually hated how little content they covered. They taught me to write an exam, not how to apply the knowledge.

But please, do go on to tell me how A Levels are better than a BTEC and that I must be dumb for studying a BTEC in Health and Social because I want to be a nurse


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Associativity
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A levels and Btecs both have their advantages, I think Btecs are actually more appropriate in more practical subjects like ICT. However bear in mind that at uni, whilst this may differ slightly between courses/unis, on my course coursework accounts for at MOST 50% of the module, usually only 25. In fact, one module had no coursework at all. That is a degree in maths, maybe other courses would have more, but you're certainly not going to escape exams at uni. My guess is that unis like A levels because they know you can pass exams, are disciplined enough to revise ect.

As for which is harder, I would personally go with A levels, since you can't take your notes, books or the internet into an exam, yet you can look at all that whilst you're doing your coursework. That doesn't mean btecs are any less work though, there's a fair amount of courseworks to get done if you go down that route! I'm not sure I completely agree that A levels and btecs shouldn't be considered equally, within reason, but I think that universities should look positively on those who take a good balance of the two in an appropriate manner.
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