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There are too many people on benefits watch

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    (Original post by Stiff Little Fingers)
    Your point may remain the same but it's a bit of a non-comment - people can have an opinion on something they've never experienced, but they should probably accept that their opinion is codswallop when told so by people who've actually experienced it - something people who moan about benefits being too cushy seem to have a hard time with.
    Or perhaps they would instead appreciate that those who have had negative experiences based on the situation are likely to have very biased views.

    It explains why so many students are very left wing and socialist.. then move across to more conservative right wing as they grow older and experience the other side of seeing their money being taken from them and distributed to others who haven't worked for it.
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    The problem isn't that there are 'too many people on benefits'. The problem is that there are not enough jobs for people to go to, and not enough is done to encourage people to become self employed. Also, the cost of living is too high (the cost of accomodation, transportation, utility bills, food, etc), meaning people simply have no choice but to rely on benefits.

    Punishing the poor, who are simply trying to surive, by cutting benefits isn't going to solve anything.

    Also, most money paid out in benefits goes out in housing benefit. It's NOT people on jobseeker's allowance etc who are the problem.

    Instead of bashing people on benefits, think about how much money the government spends on weapons, wars and lining their own pockets (e.g. the expenses scandal that came out a few years ago exposing how politicians fiddle their expenses). The amount of money governments waste on eveil deeds like this far exceeds any money paid out in benefits. Think about that before you bash the benefits system.
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    (Original post by Reue)
    Or perhaps they would instead appreciate that those who have had negative experiences based on the situation are likely to have very biased views.
    To go back to your war protesters comparison, let's take a quote doing the rounds in response to the rhetoric from the likes of Trump and Cruz:

    (Original post by Dwight D. Eisenhower)
    I hate war as only a soldier who has lived it can, only as one who has seen its brutality, its futility, its stupidity
    He served in WWII, and obviously had a negative experience of it. Would you dismiss his assessment of war (not an uncommon one among veterans) as just biased? When people consistently go into something and have the same experience, be it in war or in dealing with the job centre, and consistently come out bemoaning that they went in, how long does it take to not dismiss their complaints as bias rather than admitting that they might be right?
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    (Original post by Stiff Little Fingers)
    To go back to your war protesters comparison, let's take a quote doing the rounds in response to the rhetoric from the likes of Trump and Cruz:



    He served in WWII, and obviously had a negative experience of it. Would you dismiss his assessment of war (not an uncommon one among veterans) as just biased? When people consistently go into something and have the same experience, be it in war or in dealing with the job centre, and consistently come out bemoaning that they went in, how long does it take to not dismiss their complaints as bias rather than admitting that they might be right?
    Ive not seen anyone suggest going into the job centre was a pleasant experience so can't really comment on that question.

    But to return to the war comparison: despite the negative experiences of those directly fighting... How many people then and since believe it was still the right thing to do?

    So because these people had a bad experience fighting in war it means anyone that didn't fight but who had the opinion that going to war was the right thing must be wrong?
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    In an ideal world, with basic income, everyone is on benefits. :woo:

    So just like the NHS, everyone gets it.
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    You think that cutting benefits will increase jobs and improve the economy when the exact reason they exist is because there aren't enough jobs and there is a poor economy.
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    (Original post by TSRFT8)
    How exactly did your benefits pay for your GCSEs and Access course (no offence im just curious how that works as an access course is around £3000... How much benefits were you getting exactly)
    People on certain benefits can do certain courses, such as GCSEs and Access Courses for free and just have to pay a materials fee. You can also do GCSEs for free (well, Maths and English) regardless of your situation if you don't have a C in that subject.
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    (Original post by TSRFT8)
    1) No the problem is that too many people are on benefits, and not because there isnt enough jobs, but simply because there is not an incentive to work. The benefits in this country are a joke, on top of that there are also PLENTY of other things available for free to people who are no/low income. If they are making more from benefits than they would in work, why would they go to work and risk losing money? So you either cut benefits or increase income.
    2) Secondly you can not "encourage" someone too become self-employed/entrepreneurs, please do explain how you want to "encourage" people?
    3) The cost of living is not too high, if you are on low income and wanting to shop in waitrose/sainsbury then you are just an idiot, accommodation is paid for (in most cases) but again if you want to live in a wealthy area on £70 a week then really the fault is your own. Transport is probably the only thing i would agree is over-priced however again paying for a bus too go down the road is not really anyone's fault but your own. Also if you are on £70 a week (or whatever JSA is) and you still have £20 too blow on beer and cigarettes (as alot of people on benefits do smoke and drink lets not deny it or say the documentaries are bias as its the same if you walk through a council estate the majority (not all) are having a fag) then can you really say benefits are not enough?
    I don't agree with you. I only agree with the points I made. In fact, what we should do is scrap the benefits system and move to a Unconditional Basic Income, which will be an income that everyone is given, regardless of who they are or how much moeny they have, that will guarantee you can meet your basic needs in life such as accomodation, food, transport, clothing, etc. There will be no conditions or criteria attached to it, you will not need to sign on, etc. It will solve world poverty as everyone will be given enough money for the essentials of life. This is already being trialed in several countires and within the next generation will replace the benefits system:

    http://basicincome.org.uk/
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    (Original post by mscaffrey)

    Most people on benefits who do smoke or drink have been driven to abusing substances because of the state of their lives. We need to do more to make sure work is available for people in this country - bring manufacturing back, so people with all skill sets have an opportunity to work (my mum was a very good sewing machinist when she was younger, working in factories to make sure people had clothes to stand up in - it was an important industry that gave her a sense of purpose and it has been taken away from this country now, because it's cheaper to do elsewhere). When businesses and governments and society start to value trades again instead of always valuing what is cheapest then I think the jobs available here will rise and as a result people's mental and physical health will be better.
    Agreed, but you have stated part of the problem yourself - iow, are wages overseas too low or are we too high for unskilled and semi skilled labour ?

    Eg) a tube driver gets 50k a year, and an experienced brickie gets a little less, is that right ?
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    (Original post by nk802)
    I don't agree with you. I only agree with the points I made. In fact, what we should do is scrap the benefits system and move to a Unconditional Basic Income, which will be an income that everyone is given, regardless of who they are or how much moeny they have, that will guarantee you can meet your basic needs in life such as accomodation, food, transport, clothing, etc. There will be no conditions or criteria attached to it, you will not need to sign on, etc. It will solve world poverty as everyone will be given enough money for the essentials of life. This is already being trialed in several countires and within the next generation will replace the benefits system:

    http://basicincome.org.uk/
    The world's gdp per capita works out as about enough for everyone to have 10k - which wouldn't be enough to meet living costs in some places. Nice an idea as universal income is, it's not viable unless the global population massively shrinks

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