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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    Quite rightly. Religious studies are a blot on democracy.
    why?
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    (Original post by freida20)
    why?
    Education can not get involved in religion in a multi cultural society.
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    Education can not get involved in religion in a multi cultural society.
    There is a difference though between educating people about religion and indoctrinating them into a religion.


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    (Original post by myblueheaven339)
    There is a difference though between educating people about religion and indoctrinating them into a religion.


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    Not much. It is girt about with way too much controversy even as an "academic" subject. It isn't. Christianity is the worst. Adam & Eve aged eight ? wtf.
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    Education can not get involved in religion in a multi cultural society.
    Do you even know what Religious Education is?

    It's not just teaching about one religion or teaching that one is right. It's about giving pupils an understanding of beliefs and cultures other than their own.

    I certainly think it was valuable in my (99.9% white British) school - many people will have gone out to work in different areas where there are Muslims, Hindus, Sikhs, etc. and RE was the only time when issues to do with diversity were really discussed at school . Otherwise you would have basically not known that other belief systems existed.

    In addition to understanding minority cultures, I also think it's important to have a good knowledge of Christianity as it has had a lot of influence on our culture (for better or worse). You can't understand a lot of literature or history without at least some understanding of the religious context that influenced them, and the same goes for events and ideology in the world today.

    Personally I'm an atheist and I think most people at my school (and at the school I currently teach in) were either atheist, agnostic, totally indifferent or nominally Christian with very little interest - with a few churchgoers here and there perhaps. But this isn't the pattern worldwide and we can't attempt to understand society without understanding the belief systems behind it.
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    (Original post by myrtille)
    Do you even know what Religious Education is?

    It's not just teaching about one religion or teaching that one is right. It's about giving pupils an understanding of beliefs and cultures other than their own.

    I certainly think it was valuable in my (99.9% white British) school - many people will have gone out to work in different areas where there are Muslims, Hindus, Sikhs, etc. and RE was the only time when issues to do with diversity were really discussed at school . Otherwise you would have basically not known that other belief systems existed.

    In addition to understanding minority cultures, I also think it's important to have a good knowledge of Christianity as it has had a lot of influence on our culture (for better or worse). You can't understand a lot of literature or history without at least some understanding of the religious context that influenced them, and the same goes for events and ideology in the world today.

    Personally I'm an atheist and I think most people at my school (and at the school I currently teach in) were either atheist, agnostic, totally indifferent or nominally Christian with very little interest - with a few churchgoers here and there perhaps. But this isn't the pattern worldwide and we can't attempt to understand society without understanding the belief systems behind it.
    There is virtually zero educational value in learning what a robed bearded dude wrote on parchment thousands or hundreds of years ago. It is all rubbish. We do not need to "respect" what is patent nonsense. Introducing those subjects before a child has developed his critical faculties is ridiculous.
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    There is virtually zero educational value in learning what a robed bearded dude wrote on parchment thousands or hundreds of years ago. It is all rubbish. We do not need to "respect" what is patent nonsense. Introducing those subjects before a child has developed his critical faculties is ridiculous.
    I completely disagree.

    By introducing children to the idea that there are lots of different religions and beliefs, I think this can actually enhance their "critical faculties" compared to if they are brought up believing there is one absolute truth (whichever religion their family happens to follow).

    I never said we needed to respect all religious beliefs - that some are obviously nonsense doesn't negate the fact that they are important as a social phenomenen. Ignoring the reality that religion plays a huge role in the lives of millions of people is like sticking your fingers in your ears and closing your eyes whilst shouting "not listening!". What are you so afraid of?

    There is no intrinsic value in studying what "a robed bearded dude wrote on parchment thousands or hundreds of years ago", but if those words have had a huge impact on society and culture across the centuries and continue to do so, then it is worthwhile for that reason.

    Children are growing up surrounded by competing ideologies, so surely it's better to encounter them in a learning environment where they are open to discussion and looked at properly than just via stereotypes (Muslim terrorists, American creationist "Bible basher" types, etc.).
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    Wow, I actually feel quite strongly about this for a French teacher! Maybe I should diversify into RE teaching as well...

    Anyway, I think we should let this topic return to its real purpose - you can always take the debate over to the Religion forum if you wish.
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    (Original post by myrtille)
    Wow, I actually feel quite strongly about this for a French teacher! Maybe I should diversify into RE teaching as well...

    Anyway, I think we should let this topic return to its real purpose - you can always take the debate over to the Religion forum if you wish.
    lol! I got distracted and you saved me from having to reply - good answers! Wasn 't sure if old fart - oops - old simon - was jesting or just ignorant!

    RE is such a diverse subject - study of religions and cultures is just a part of it - ethics, philosophy, enquiry - I'm pretty sure old fart oops (sorry again) Old simon would probably actually really enjoy debating and investigating the philosophy of religion!!

    Too much to worry about on a Friday night though!

    back to the stresses of PGCE - any advice on grants or money that will supplement the student loan?? I don't think its much to live on?
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    Education can not get involved in religion in a multi cultural society.
    It is the very fact that we live in a multicultural society that makes studying RE so important. Nowhere within the curriculum are students indoctrinated or told what to believe, or indeed that they have to necessarily "respect" religion.
    Religious Studies in secondary schools is an incredibly diverse subject, covering moral and social issues from no particular religious viewpoint - it allows students the time to consider things they often never have the time nor inclination to consider outside of these lessons.
    To allow students to go out into the world ignorant of the myriad of belief systems in the world and the effect they have had and continue to have in shaping civilizations and cultures would be a huge shame and leave a big gap in their general understanding of the world and how it came to be the way it is today.

    I could write more but I don't want this to turn into an essay and as Myrtille said, it would further derail the thread (apologies, not another word I promise!)

    (Original post by freida20)

    back to the stresses of PGCE - any advice on grants or money that will supplement the student loan?? I don't think its much to live on?
    Hi Fredia, have you heard of the Keswick Hall Trust? http://www.cstg.org.uk/grants/pgce-bursaries/
    They provide grants (non-repayable) to PGCE RE students. I am in the process of applying so don't know if everyone who applies gets one, but it's worth a try!
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    Hi Fredia, have you heard of the Keswick Hall Trust? http://www.cstg.org.uk/grants/pgce-bursaries/
    They provide grants (non-repayable) to PGCE RE students. I am in the process of applying so don't know if everyone who applies gets one, but it's worth a try![/QUOTE]


    thanks - yes I have - once I have my offer I will apply - what is the application like? I think they have limited funds so it must be a limited amount of applicants will get one. Do you have to specify how much you are applying for and justify it? Thanks for the tip.
    Where will you be studying?
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    (Original post by Shelly_x)
    So I was offered a job today at my 2nd placement school! So happy!
    So delighted to see this! I bet you're over the moon and you will know a lot about the school already so that's a nice bonus. Well done and go and celebrate!
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    (Original post by freida20)


    thanks - yes I have - once I have my offer I will apply - what is the application like? I think they have limited funds so it must be a limited amount of applicants will get one. Do you have to specify how much you are applying for and justify it? Thanks for the tip.
    Where will you be studying?
    I would contact Student finance to discuss your circumstances. I know for dependent applicants if their parents/whoever they're depending on's income will change dramatically in the year they are studying they can fill in a special form. Not sure if this applies for independent candidates regarding their own income but definitely worth checking.

    Xxx

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    Does anyone know how common it is for schools to ask for references before shortlisting? The job I've applied for- they've contacted my referees asking for a reference (last wednesday), and saying the interview is next wednesday (although not sure how that'll work with the strike going on), but they haven't contacted me yet :confused: Now I've no idea what to think
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    (Original post by Aleeece123)
    Does anyone know how common it is for schools to ask for references before shortlisting? The job I've applied for- they've contacted my referees asking for a reference (last wednesday), and saying the interview is next wednesday (although not sure how that'll work with the strike going on), but they haven't contacted me yet :confused: Now I've no idea what to think
    It's entirely up to the school. Some will ask for references as soon as they get applications so they have extra things to go on/to avoid delays, but others might check them later. Certainly I wouldn't panic about it, though I would be prepared for an interview on Wednesday should you be offered one.

    The school may not be closed for the strike, or if they are they may not want to see you teach as part of the interview.

    xxx
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    (Original post by Aleeece123)
    Does anyone know how common it is for schools to ask for references before shortlisting? The job I've applied for- they've contacted my referees asking for a reference (last wednesday), and saying the interview is next wednesday (although not sure how that'll work with the strike going on), but they haven't contacted me yet :confused: Now I've no idea what to think
    Not very common. Its likely that they've already shortlisted you and just haven't told you yet! However, I have heard of some schools doing this which is a bit odd.
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    I really am losing the will to write any more applications. So far all have been in vain. They're so exhausting.

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    (Original post by qwerty_mad)
    I really am losing the will to write any more applications. So far all have been in vain. They're so exhausting.

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    Completely agree. I applied to a school I REALLY liked last week and on the visit the head said we'd find out yesterday if we'd been shortlisted. Nothing. I felt like the visit went really well and am pretty gutted not to have even been shortlisted.
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    I just haven't even found any jobs near me hoping and praying my placement school decides to create a new post however if they don't hurry up I'll be applying to any job I can find near me!

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    I feel your frustration - it is such a laborious process to write out every one of them, when you are already pressed for time on a daily basis!!
 
 
 
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