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    Can't believe so many people have had such hard times with mental illness, it's really quite sad...I thought the situation was much better than 10 yrs ago or so, now more people know about them and should be more open to helping you out.

    I had Body Dysmorphic Disorder throughout secondary school, and had a really quite unhappy time there, and now I've got different, much more complicated mental health problems at Uni.

    But throughout my time, my family have helped me out, despite not understanding at all what I was going through, and my CBT therapist was really very good, and I still somehow managed to get through school and into my Uni of choice.

    But I'm shocked that the NHS is still so bad at helping those with mental health problems, I thought the resources and psychologists/ counsellors available would have been decent, and not fraught with mis-diagnoses etc. Can anybody explain this to me?

    The biggest problem in my experience with mental health problems is that other people misjudge you. It irritates me sooooooooo much that people will almost always look at some guy who comes across as scared/ socially awkward/ acts differently in some way, and never think for some reason that there might be some other explanation for it, such as mental illness. Naturally, ignoring the possibility of mental illness, they might then bully him/ ignore him/ make his life harder for him. This, to me, is probably just as bad as the illness itself. Does anybody else feel the same way?
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    (Original post by deej3005)
    But I'm shocked that the NHS is still so bad at helping those with mental health problems, I thought the resources and psychologists/ counsellors available would have been decent, and not fraught with mis-diagnoses etc. Can anybody explain this to me?
    I was really shocked when my GP dismissed my symptoms as 'being silly'. It meant that I spent the Christmas holidays miserable, thinking that I was overreacting to something that wasn't really a problem. Only now, after several suicidal thoughts and a lot of (albeit mild) self harm, am I able to realise that my GP was the one who was in the wrong. I've changed surgeries and will see a doctor next week.

    As for people making the mental illness worse, I can definitely see that. My friends have previously referred to me as a "mental b*tch" and it definitely did not make me ANY better whatsoever. It felt like those closest to me were not supportive even though there was something clearly wrong with me. I've found that (cliche though it is), talking about and admitting I have a problem was the first step to acceptance. My friends were much more understanding than I thought they would be.

    I'm not even scared to post this non-anon. I'm glad I'm admitting this; it's a relief.
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    I saw my GP and well, they didn't take my worst symptoms seriously. It made me feel like there was no help available. Like they just look for depressive or psychotic disorders. Can you ask them to refer you to a psychiatrist who's trained to properly assess you?
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    I hope they do something, if not I'll ask them to refer me.
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    (Original post by BigBang09)
    I hope they do something, if not I'll ask them to refer me.
    I had this problem the first time I went to see a GP. He decided that if I wasn't losing touch with reality, I was plainly fine. Lol.. no, not so much. Eventually, I decided I really did need help, and got myself an appointment with a different GP at the same practice, who was nice enough to refer me to a psychiatrist.
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    (Original post by BigBang09)
    I hope they do something, if not I'll ask them to refer me.
    I was not directly replying to your post. I should have made it clearer that it was a question for my own benefit.
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    (Original post by laut_biru)
    I had this problem the first time I went to see a GP. He decided that if I wasn't losing touch with reality, I was plainly fine. Lol.. no, not so much. Eventually, I decided I really did need help, and got myself an appointment with a different GP at the same practice, who was nice enough to refer me to a psychiatrist.
    I might just do this instead. Some doctors just don't understand what you're saying. :sigh:
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    (Original post by Liquidus Zeromus)
    I was not directly replying to your post. I should have made it clearer that it was a question for my own benefit.
    Oops, sorry! I think you can ask them to refer you, if not I'd just book an appointment with another GP... There was a time last month where I considered going to the ER and telling them that I was suicidal, so that someone, somewhere, would recognise what was happening. But that's a bad idea, so I'm gonna stick with the GP


    (Original post by laut_biru)
    I had this problem the first time I went to see a GP. He decided that if I wasn't losing touch with reality, I was plainly fine. Lol.. no, not so much. Eventually, I decided I really did need help, and got myself an appointment with a different GP at the same practice, who was nice enough to refer me to a psychiatrist.
    Yeah, this is my situation exactly. i hope they refer me but I'm worried about walking in to a new practice and saying 'yeah, hi I'm new, and I've done this, this and this to myself. Fix me.' I suppose they see it all the time though yeah?
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    (Original post by Liquidus Zeromus)
    I might just do this instead. Some doctors just don't understand what you're saying. :sigh:
    Gp's are kinda jack of all trades, master of none to some extent, which doesn't help at all. I think the Dr who was meant to be my GP, insofar as he was specialised, was specialised in minor operations, and that sort of thing. Sometimes, they just don't know much about mental illness outside of the really obvious cases.

    Not only that, but if you're 17 you might find it difficult to find care anyway. NHS mental health services for kids end at 16 but start at 18 for adults. I've known several people spend a year being literally bounced back and forth between the two, until they turn 18 and suddenly they get treatment!

    (Original post by BigBang09)
    Yeah, this is my situation exactly. i hope they refer me but I'm worried about walking in to a new practice and saying 'yeah, hi I'm new, and I've done this, this and this to myself. Fix me.' I suppose they see it all the time though yeah?
    I wouldn't word it quite like that but they should have seen someone else with mental health problems before. Hopefully you'll have better luck this time.
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    (Original post by Unoriginal-)
    If it wasn't a social thing, then people wouldn't self-harm in such a limited amount of ways. Slitting ones wrists would not be so common. Obviously there are other ways in which to self-harm, but if it was actually psychological, then the methods wouldn't be so limited - fact.

    Also, just because it is influenced by society, doesn't mean you have to tell people about it.
    I'm sorry but the way I see 'social' would be people self harming in groups. It's a solitary thing therefore it isn't social. The methods aren't limited. There are hundreds of different ways to self harm. And I don't tell people about it because it is influenced by society. I tell certain people because I trust them and they care about me and they help.
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    (Original post by laut_biru)
    Gp's are kinda jack of all trades, master of none to some extent, which doesn't help at all. I think the Dr who was meant to be my GP, insofar as he was specialised, was specialised in minor operations, and that sort of thing. Sometimes, they just don't know much about mental illness outside of the really obvious cases.

    Not only that, but if you're 17 you might find it difficult to find care anyway. NHS mental health services for kids end at 16 but start at 18 for adults. I've known several people spend a year being literally bounced back and forth between the two, until they turn 18 and suddenly they get treatment!
    Yeah, I guess so. Going to keep trying until I can get access to a specialist. Hopefully it won't be too hard even if I see the same GP. Perhaps appearing slightly more worried/distressed would help. Sometimes you have to "put it on" a bit to get attention so I hear.

    I'm 20 so no problem there.
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    (Original post by BigBang09)
    I was really shocked when my GP dismissed my symptoms as 'being silly'. It meant that I spent the Christmas holidays miserable, thinking that I was overreacting to something that wasn't really a problem. Only now, after several suicidal thoughts and a lot of (albeit mild) self harm, am I able to realise that my GP was the one who was in the wrong. I've changed surgeries and will see a doctor next week.

    As for people making the mental illness worse, I can definitely see that. My friends have previously referred to me as a "mental b*tch" and it definitely did not make me ANY better whatsoever. It felt like those closest to me were not supportive even though there was something clearly wrong with me. I've found that (cliche though it is), talking about and admitting I have a problem was the first step to acceptance. My friends were much more understanding than I thought they would be.

    I'm not even scared to post this non-anon. I'm glad I'm admitting this; it's a relief.
    How can your friends have been understanding if they called you a 'mental b*tch'? And I'm still struggling to believe some of the horror stories on here, are people just making it up?
    • #44
    #44

    (Original post by Liquidus Zeromus)
    I think I have obsessional OCD and some other social/general anxiety. It's been such a pain because it "mimics" other mental disorders :indiff: The only thing that's really alerted me to this is my constant rumination over mental illness for a month or so. Going to a doctor about it.
    Hmmm, I've become slightly 'obsessed' (not in that sense) with mental illnesses in general recently. It's not like I think about these things all the time, even in the periods of normaity between the ****-ups, but I'm becoming convinced that it's my thinking about it that is making it happen, at the same time as thinking that there might actually be something wrong with me...

    The problem is that these thoughts seem to coincide with and integrate with the "symptoms", so I ruminate more on mental illness when I am actually struggling. So I can never tell. IDK. I'm just troubled by the possible harmfulness of the ready availability of information about mental illness. At least if I didn't know anything about it I would be able to rule out this possibility.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Hmmm, I've become slightly 'obsessed' (not in that sense) with mental illnesses in general recently. It's not like I think about these things all the time, even in the periods of normaity between the ****-ups, but I'm becoming convinced that it's my thinking about it that is making it happen, at the same time as thinking that there might actually be something wrong with me...

    The problem is that these thoughts seem to coincide with and integrate with the "symptoms", so I ruminate more on mental illness when I am actually struggling. So I can never tell. IDK. I'm just troubled by the possible harmfulness of the ready availability of information about mental illness. At least if I didn't know anything about it I would be able to rule out this possibility.
    The thing with me is, I believed that the way I thought was normal, until I took things into perspective and realised just how screwed up it is to say... ruminate about these things constantly unless I do something productive before such thought patterns can set in. For example, at a party last year. I wasn't thinking so much about my family or presents or even the food, I was thinking obsessively about the possibility that I had [insert serious mental illness here] and its implications. All my thoughts were centred around it. And no this isn't hypochondria because you could replace that with worrying non-medical topics, it would be the same.
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    (Original post by deej3005)
    How can your friends have been understanding if they called you a 'mental b*tch'? And I'm still struggling to believe some of the horror stories on here, are people just making it up?
    because at first they believed I was a b*tch. it wasn't until I admitted hurting myself that they understood my problem. i'm making nothing up; don't know about anyone else - which horror stories are you referring to?
    • #44
    #44

    (Original post by Liquidus Zeromus)
    The thing with me is, I believed that the way I thought was normal, until I took things into perspective and realised just how screwed up it is to say... ruminate about these things constantly unless I do something productive before such thought patterns can set in. For example, at a party last year. I wasn't thinking so much about my family or presents or even the food, I was thinking obsessively about the possibility that I had [insert serious mental illness here] and its implications. All my thoughts were centred around it. And no this isn't hypochondria because you could replace that with worrying non-medical topics, it would be the same.
    Yeah that's the thing - even if you can tell the way you're thinking about things or have been thinking about things is not right, you can't seem to change the thoughts themselves, and changing the thoughts themselves wouldn't have an effect on anything (you'd just be doing the same things concerning something else.) But at the same time (for me) because I know about the possibility it's something that I don't forget when my mood changes (I have always had a tendency to overanalyse myself and intellectualise things), so I can't always be sure things *would* be different, and I can't tell to what extent these thoughts *are* influencing my behaviour.

    Like, after the fact, I can tell the way I was thinking in an "up" mood (they quickly turn irritable for me and I end up having stream-of-consciousness unstoppable arguments with myself centring on whether some thing in particular that I am doing is or is not a symptom and whether or not I am in fact making it up and whether or not the racing thoughts that I am having at that particular moment are "on purpose" or not and my attempts to prevent myself doing other things that could constitute "symptoms" are just "my brain" trying to make out that they are symptoms and thus prove I am mental even though I am in fact NOT mental it is just my brain playing tricks on me, or I get very paranoid about whether or not everyone else can tell that "i am, in fact, mental" etc... although this is not all they constitute), or in a "down" mood I just tell myself that there is nothing wrong with me and I am simply a lazy ******* and so on, though then I mostly think absolutely nothing.

    I can tell the way I'm thinking about this *now* is much more level-headed, I'm confused and unsure about it, yeah (even the characterisation of "up" and "down" moods which just seems like self-validation), but I'm not doing either of those things and I'm much more able to stop myself running off on some self-damaging tangent either way, and just think about something else. (Which is odd because since yesterday evening I've been incredibly low and I've just dragged myself up to a functioning level within the past ten minutes - the transience is something that makes it very difficult to believe the reality of the moods and quite ****s with your identity as well.)
    • #14
    #14

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Yeah that's the thing - even if you can tell the way you're thinking about things or have been thinking about things is not right, you can't seem to change the thoughts themselves, and changing the thoughts themselves wouldn't have an effect on anything (you'd just be doing the same things concerning something else.) But at the same time (for me) because I know about the possibility it's something that I don't forget when my mood changes (I have always had a tendency to overanalyse myself and intellectualise things), so I can't always be sure things *would* be different, and I can't tell to what extent these thoughts *are* influencing my behaviour.

    Like, after the fact, I can tell the way I was thinking in an "up" mood (they quickly turn irritable for me and I end up having stream-of-consciousness unstoppable arguments with myself centring on whether some thing in particular that I am doing is or is not a symptom and whether or not I am in fact making it up and whether or not the racing thoughts that I am having at that particular moment are "on purpose" or not and my attempts to prevent myself doing other things that could constitute "symptoms" are just "my brain" trying to make out that they are symptoms and thus prove I am mental even though I am in fact NOT mental it is just my brain playing tricks on me, or I get very paranoid about whether or not everyone else can tell that "i am, in fact, mental" etc... although this is not all they constitute), or in a "down" mood I just tell myself that there is nothing wrong with me and I am simply a lazy ******* and so on, though then I mostly think absolutely nothing.

    I can tell the way I'm thinking about this *now* is much more level-headed, I'm confused and unsure about it, yeah (even the characterisation of "up" and "down" moods which just seems like self-validation), but I'm not doing either of those things and I'm much more able to stop myself running off on some self-damaging tangent either way, and just think about something else. (Which is odd because since yesterday evening I've been incredibly low and I've just dragged myself up to a functioning level within the past ten minutes - the transience is something that makes it very difficult to believe the reality of the moods and quite ****s with your identity as well.)
    This, this, this! Particularly the last bit where when I'm not feeling really up or down, it feels like I was exaggerating at the time, or that they couldn't have been that bad, surely? When I feel normal (like now, hope it lasts!) I feel like I'm being daft about my moods, but when I'm in one (particularly low) it gets too much.
    • #3
    #3

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Like, after the fact, I can tell the way I was thinking in an "up" mood (they quickly turn irritable for me and I end up having stream-of-consciousness unstoppable arguments with myself centring on whether some thing in particular that I am doing is or is not a symptom and whether or not I am in fact making it up and whether or not the racing thoughts that I am having at that particular moment are "on purpose" or not and my attempts to prevent myself doing other things that could constitute "symptoms" are just "my brain" trying to make out that they are symptoms and thus prove I am mental even though I am in fact NOT mental it is just my brain playing tricks on me, or I get very paranoid about whether or not everyone else can tell that "i am, in fact, mental" etc... although this is not all they constitute), or in a "down" mood I just tell myself that there is nothing wrong with me and I am simply a lazy ******* and so on, though then I mostly think absolutely nothing.
    I get these exact thoughts.

    I often think I'm not actually depressed in fact my brain is so lazy that it won't let me concentrate so I'll assume that I'm depressed and hence won't do any work. :confused: It's kind of retarded thinking.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Like, after the fact, I can tell the way I was thinking in an "up" mood (they quickly turn irritable for me and I end up having stream-of-consciousness unstoppable arguments with myself centring on whether some thing in particular that I am doing is or is not a symptom and whether or not I am in fact making it up and whether or not the racing thoughts that I am having at that particular moment are "on purpose" or not and my attempts to prevent myself doing other things that could constitute "symptoms" are just "my brain" trying to make out that they are symptoms and thus prove I am mental even though I am in fact NOT mental it is just my brain playing tricks on me, or I get very paranoid about whether or not everyone else can tell that "i am, in fact, mental" etc... although this is not all they constitute), or in a "down" mood I just tell myself that there is nothing wrong with me and I am simply a lazy ******* and so on, though then I mostly think absolutely nothing.
    I worry that people around me can read my nervousness, detect my disturbing thoughts, and identify me as a monstrous person. It serves to make things worse, even overwhelming.

    It becomes a threatening situation where I fear that something bad, some sort of punishment, is imminent.
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    It affected me life, big time.
 
 
 
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