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    (Original post by malaperdas)
    i prefere not to say
    just wondering what were your entry requirements to get into the masters program?
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    I was wondering if anyone could tell me if the 'Guesthouse' accommodation provided by the university is cheaper than renting a flat? ~
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    (Original post by maytheodds)
    I was wondering if anyone could tell me if the 'Guesthouse' accommodation provided by the university is cheaper than renting a flat? ~
    Depends where, in general a like for like room is more expensive. But a whole flat, well that could cost 1K+ P/M, in which case a room from the guesthouse will be cheaper.
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    Hello,
    I am thinking of applying next year 2014-2015 to the university in either the European public health program or art and science program. But I just had a few questions:
    *Do you have to write essays for the application? And if yes, what kind?
    *And when would I apply for next year?

    Thank you very much!!
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    There are 'low' entry requirements across the whole of the Netherlands. This has nothing to do with the workload (compared to a first year in the UK which doesn't even count in many uni's I would say the workload in Maastricht is much higher and harder). It is just the Dutch higher education system. Basically the Dutch say that those students who pass their high school education (even with the bare minimum) should be given the chance to go to university if they want to try. Whether or not they stay there is a different thing. Therefore the first year in the Netherlands is the most important year. If you fail your first year you cannot go through to the second year, nor study the same subject at a different Dutch university. This is very different to the UK where they set all the boundaries before you get the chance to go to university. I am English and moved to Maastricht 3 years ago, but once you get your head around this small hurdle, you realise that infact you are doing a LOT more work than your mates who all went to the UK to uni.
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    (Original post by Bill18)
    Hello,
    I am thinking of applying next year 2014-2015 to the university in either the European public health program or art and science program. But I just had a few questions:
    *Do you have to write essays for the application? And if yes, what kind?
    *And when would I apply for next year?

    Thank you very much!!
    Yep! Firstly they are two very different courses, and my advice (as someone who switched between a scientific course and an arts course) is really think about your decision, don't just apply for the one that you think you will get onto. Secondly, for liberal arts & sciences you have to write an essay. They will publish the criteria for that online in October. Also, the applications open in October, normally the first week or two.
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    (Original post by Alexgadgetman)
    Depends where, in general a like for like room is more expensive. But a whole flat, well that could cost 1K+ P/M, in which case a room from the guesthouse will be cheaper.
    Completely depends, but more often than not, no it's cheaper to do a bit of house hunting and find something in the city.
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    (Original post by TheresaB45)
    There are 'low' entry requirements across the whole of the Netherlands. This has nothing to do with the workload (compared to a first year in the UK which doesn't even count in many uni's I would say the workload in Maastricht is much higher and harder). It is just the Dutch higher education system. Basically the Dutch say that those students who pass their high school education (even with the bare minimum) should be given the chance to go to university if they want to try. Whether or not they stay there is a different thing. Therefore the first year in the Netherlands is the most important year. If you fail your first year you cannot go through to the second year, nor study the same subject at a different Dutch university. This is very different to the UK where they set all the boundaries before you get the chance to go to university. I am English and moved to Maastricht 3 years ago, but once you get your head around this small hurdle, you realise that infact you are doing a LOT more work than your mates who all went to the UK to uni.
    (Original post by TheresaB45)
    Yep! Firstly they are two very different courses, and my advice (as someone who switched between a scientific course and an arts course) is really think about your decision, don't just apply for the one that you think you will get onto. Secondly, for liberal arts & sciences you have to write an essay. They will publish the criteria for that online in October. Also, the applications open in October, normally the first week or two.
    Thank you very much for your answers!! Much clearer! Thank you very much! Hopefully be ready by October than!

    And so would I find the requirements be on Studielink?
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    Hi there!

    Starting in February 2014, I would like to do my Master in InternationalBusiness (Strategic Marketing) @Maastricht University.

    Profile:

    - 23 years / male / German
    - Bachelor of Arts in Business Management and Tourism (240 ECTS (~ 20ECTS in Statistics), 80% English, 20% German, final mark ~ 1,5(very good))
    - GMAT: 560, Q: 39, V: 27, AWA: between 5-6
    - English: fluently, Spanish: fluently
    - 1/2 year Australia -> Work and Travel
    - 1/2 year Argentina ->Studying "Marketing Global"
    - 1/2 year Costa Rica -> Internship @Chamber of Commerce
    - since March -> internship + thesis in Marketing @Volkswagen AG,been suggested for the Volkswagen academic talent-pool
    - months of traveling in Latin America, Europe, Australia, Asia
    - extra-curricular activities → provided assistance for the Erasmusstudents

    I'm currently writing my bachelor thesis and besides I work full-time at Volkswagen. I spent so many hours studying for the GMAT, but it seemslike it had been my bad luck Friday. -> only a 560 score....and unfortunately I do not really have time for retaking it.

    Fromthe website:

    „The files of all other applicants will be assessed by the Board of Admission, based on the criteria which are described in Required Documents. Please note that applicants with a GMAT score lowerthan 550 or an analytical writing score of 4.0 or lower will only beaccepted in exceptional cases.“

    Do you think I've gotchances to get a spot next February? Should I explain my bad GMAT in any way in the Letter of Motivation?

    Thank you very much guys!! :-)

    Greetings!
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    (Original post by HurricaneDominic)
    I am looking to study in Holland next year as well, but there are not many Universities that teach Engineering in English, the same goes for Denmark.
    The courses taught in English all seem to be of the Arts or Humanities, as well as Business/Economics.
    TU Delft offers aerospace engineering in English


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    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2353102


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    Hey !!

    I'm an international student from Bali, Indonesia looking to apply here next year 2014 taking the course International Business. I was just wondering, what requirements would be needed in order to get accepted?

    I don't have a Dutch diploma, but I'm doing A-Levels taking English Language, Travel and Tourism, Business Studies, and General Studies.

    Oh, and I would also love to hear you guys' experience of the University!! (preferably students that study International Business there ) - Like how are the lecturers, environment, social life etc.

    Would love to hear from you guys soon!
    Much love from Bali! Xxx
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    (Original post by Kgriffin13)
    TU Delft offers aerospace engineering in English


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Try TU Eindhoven as well, they offer four or five Bachelor programmes, like Delft it's a technical university so only science/engineering things there. It's also part of the Brainpoort (one of the smartest regions in the world) and I was speaking to an admissions officer from there last week, most of their graduates are working in the industry within 6 months of graduating.
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    (Original post by Jay1990)
    Hi there!

    Starting in February 2014, I would like to do my Master in InternationalBusiness (Strategic Marketing) @Maastricht University.

    Profile:

    - 23 years / male / German
    - Bachelor of Arts in Business Management and Tourism (240 ECTS (~ 20ECTS in Statistics), 80% English, 20% German, final mark ~ 1,5(very good))
    - GMAT: 560, Q: 39, V: 27, AWA: between 5-6
    - English: fluently, Spanish: fluently
    - 1/2 year Australia -> Work and Travel
    - 1/2 year Argentina ->Studying "Marketing Global"
    - 1/2 year Costa Rica -> Internship @Chamber of Commerce
    - since March -> internship + thesis in Marketing @Volkswagen AG,been suggested for the Volkswagen academic talent-pool
    - months of traveling in Latin America, Europe, Australia, Asia
    - extra-curricular activities → provided assistance for the Erasmusstudents

    I'm currently writing my bachelor thesis and besides I work full-time at Volkswagen. I spent so many hours studying for the GMAT, but it seemslike it had been my bad luck Friday. -> only a 560 score....and unfortunately I do not really have time for retaking it.

    Fromthe website:

    „The files of all other applicants will be assessed by the Board of Admission, based on the criteria which are described in Required Documents. Please note that applicants with a GMAT score lowerthan 550 or an analytical writing score of 4.0 or lower will only beaccepted in exceptional cases.“

    Do you think I've gotchances to get a spot next February? Should I explain my bad GMAT in any way in the Letter of Motivation?

    Thank you very much guys!! :-)

    Greetings!
    I would definitely add something in your letter of motivation about that, but try not to make excuses I think. If everything else is fine they might see that you had a bad day
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    (Original post by Bill18)
    Thank you very much for your answers!! Much clearer! Thank you very much! Hopefully be ready by October than!

    And so would I find the requirements be on Studielink?
    You will find the requirements on the UCM section of the website for the liberal arts course, for any other course you will find their specific requirements (this will only relate to the documents, maybe subjects in some cases but never specific grades) on the respective faculty pages of the website. Hope that helps!
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    (Original post by malaperdas)
    After doing a masters there i want to share my experience so maybe future applicants will have better information about the uni and the town than i did.

    1) they advertise it as international. they technically dont lie but its i would say 60% germans, 30% dutch, 10% other nationalities. and being full of germans means that they change the language to german when they do not HAVE to speak in english. and maastricht is not exactly what one may have in mind as "dutch".

    2) teaching: they have what is called PBL. in practice this means that they just tell you to study everything by yourself, in most of the courses the "teacher" (who usually is not a proffessor but a phd, often from an irrelevant subject) doesnt talk more than 5 minutes per hour. being a "tutor" (that is how they call the teachers there) is an easy job. you just have to hear the students talking about subjects they dont really know. you will learn from studying the material by yourself and going to the classroom and discussing about it with other people who were supposed to have studied it. problem is, these people are not professors who have spent their lifes studying a particular subject, they are just students like you who think that talking much will give them a good grade. so they talk about bul**** a lot. you also dont get informed about university internships and anything related to the university. you are expected to find everything out by yourself.

    3) budget: you will be very lucky if you find something whithin 15' walking from the uni for under 350 euros. usually it will be more like 400 for a room. most goods at supermarkets are reasonably priced, beer price is like 2.5 euros for 250 cl at bars. finding a job? very difficult unless you speak dutch. sometimes you can find something if youre a native german or french speaker, but this is rare.

    4) reputation: for some reason everybody brags about it. my guess is that it is people (mostly germans as i said) usually comming from nearby villages. they go abroad to study (usually because they did not get accepted in the german higher education system) and they want to belive (and make everybody else belive) that maastricht is a very difficult university and bla bla bla. doing my masters there i finished with almost an 8 gpa, with very little effort, and i didnt learn much. keep in mind that people who have done a bachelor in maastricht are not required to take any of the entrance tests. this combined with the group work that will be everywhere means that you will have to cooperate with people who are not at the same level as you are, and your grade will probably depend on them as well.

    5) social life: most students in the masters have also done their bachelors there (and speak german). this means that they already have their social circles which it will be difficult for you to invade. if youre a person who likes to go out, you will go to the same places all the time and you will see the same faces (this can both be good or bad). only 2 places open after 2 am (this can be both good or bad again, depending on what you make of it). an all-dutch "club" and a mostly german "club". it is definately not a "student town" but a normal dutch town with people who have their lives going on there and unless they are somehow in the business of taking the money off students, they dont really care about you.

    6) job oportunities: i dont really know, i had my own family business in my hometown and i just wanted a change for one year

    all in all. think again before you go there, visit the town, try to be in more than one tutorial and dont base your choice on their website. the dutch are good at selling things. they can sell sand to an arab, so while you can learn and take advantage from it, you also have to keep it in mind when you make your choice. if you did a bachelors in a good university definetely dont go there for a masters. dont get attracted by the 1900 euro tuition fees. it will cost you a lot more one way or another

    University college maastricht has a lot of girls, if youre male go there.
    It sounds like you studied at the business school...where of course there are a lot of German students (who could study for much less in Germany...sometimes even for free I might add) I'd also like to add (being a bachelor student in Maastricht) that PBL does not work for every subject or every student, and in many cases it is modified. It is designed to combine academic study with ''working world'' study and doesn't always match some students studying methods. Also PhD students are required to teach as part of their agreement with the university (you will find this at most universities in the world I think...anyone who does research will have to teach some courses, and most will pick fields of their study, unless it is something like academic writing skills etc which doesn't require a specific field of study).

    In terms of rooms, the earlier you look the better chance you have at getting somewhere cheaper & more central. Both the rooms I have lived in here in Maastricht have been 10 minutes walk from the centre (I now live 5 minutes walk) and under €300....I'm not the only person like this either. Also master's students have halls of residence (along with international students). I know other Dutch cities which are much more expensive, and it's not a huge city at all, it takes 30 minutes to cycle from one side of the city to the other....better than living in Amsterdam, London, Cologne wherever where you need to use public transport to get to uni.

    Perhaps something which is a testament as to why people love this uni so much...almost everyone I know who has graduated in the last 2 years (I've been here 3 years) be it master or bachelor student has come back to Maastricht. They either started a master's programme somewhere else (the UK, other Dutch city, wherever) and didn't like it, they found better jobs here in the area, they miss the city, are now a tutor, among other reasons.
    It's a completely different way of studying to the very rigid UK system of ''I'm going to give you 100 pages of notes about what I think on some principle'' in a lecture with 500 students. That works for some people, but the level of involvement at the uni here is whatever students make of it. If you want to just go to class and study that's fine, but you also have so much more freedom here to do internships alongside your study, you can delay graduation if you get offered a job or something like that (if you try and write a thesis and work full time it can be intense....why should your grade suffer because you're earning money??)

    I'm not saying it is a perfect uni, trust me I have heard some real horror stories about all kinds of things, but I think that if you compare the opportunities you get here with what you would be offered at other universities in europe I think that it's good to point out that it's not all bad. (I've had three job offers and I am not even graduating until next summer....I wish I could say I am a shining example but I'm not. Uni is what you want to get out of it)
    I might do my masters here...I know I'm defintely not going to the UK, but there is a reason why so many UM students stay on here, we just love it so damn much!

    I don't mean to have a go at the author of this post by the way, I just felt I needed to provide a few comments on things. It sucks to have a bad expereince and it's always good to hear about them because like you say, the uni has to suit the student. But I think it's unfair to rule out all masters programmes (some of which are ranked best in the country, best in Europe and so forth) because one guy had a bad experience.

    (Also, it's very easy to avoid the ''large'' groups of German students, and many of them have friends from all different nationalities too. You will find that when you go to another country, where there are clusters of people from the same country, they tend to hang out together, cook food together and speak in the same language together. The Dutch do it, the British, the Polish, Spanish, Italian....everyone really, and as it is the most international university in the netherlands you are going to get that. )
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    Hello everyone,

    Just wondering (because I may just be confused) if the fees have gone up from around 1700 euros to 8500?

    Im a UK student and desperately hope they haven't increased by this much!

    Sam
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    (Original post by Duncan8)
    First of all, let me introduce myself! I'm a 19 year old student from Belgium. I always wanted to study abroad and in English specially.


    During my last year of high school I quickly searched for unis in the Netherlands and came across Maastricht, 50km away from my hometown. I visited the city and instantly fell in love with it. I soon decided to apply to the faculty of law, to study European law (and after International laws). Check the faculty tour here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LGGiz1lj2rk

    Also check out the CITY video here (really nice video): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSSHy...layer_embedded

    Maastricht university also offers programs in European studies, Science, Engineering, European Public Health, International Business, Econometrics (more Finance), and Economics. The university has a Triple-crown accreditation (only a few in the world received that award including the London Business School, Warwick, ...).

    So a few things I learnt about Maastricht University and Maastricht in general:

    - The way of learning is a bit different: you sit in small classes and it's PBL (Problem Based Learning). I was a bit intrigued about this approach, but it turned out to improve considerably my speaking skills and I ended up studying more regularly. It works the way like that: You always have to prepare 4 to 6 tasks before the class starts and the discussion leader asks other students about them. The discussion leader is appointed by the tutor at the end of each class to prepare the next tutorial.


    - Tutors are approachable. If you have a question, just shoot them an email and they sometimes will even reply you on Sunday's!


    - You can do plenty of things there, ranging from sports to student associations. I have some friends who are doing some rowing on the Maas, also some are doing Thai Boxing, Kick Boxing, or other sports. It usually costs around 80 to 120€ a year. Gym is the same price. Regarding student associations, I enrolled in UNSA, it's like the Model United Nations. You prepare the big conference in Maastricht and go to Sweden, Germany, and even Israel to speak at those conferences. You also drink on a weekly basis in a relaxed environment!

    - Living in Maastricht is just great. It's definitely a student city with tons of bars, restaurants everywhere and deals for students (you often get 10 to 25% off at various locations). The city atmosphere is lovely, and chill. Going out is always a great experience, even if beers are a bit expensive in pubs in the centre, you have plenty of student bars with 1€ a beer.

    - I'm still amazed by the architecture. The faculties are all located in the centre but separated from each other. The Faculty of law is built in an old church but is all brand new in the inside. It's the case for all university buildings, it's hard to describe how it looks like, but stunning is a good start!

    - Get a bike. There are no cars driving in the centre. No cars mean also better air! It's really peaceful to bike around the city and its cobbled streets.

    - It's not cheap, but not expensive either. 1713€ are the annual tuition fees for European citizens. (EDIT: it rises every year so it might be a bit higher for the academic year 2013-2014)

    - Finding a job in Maastricht? Easy bizy. I sent roughly 15 emails and got 4 job offers - at a cocktail bar, in a hostel, in a call-centre, and at Apple. I don't even speak Dutch!

    - Renting a flat is not expensive either. You can find flats around the university faculties starting at 250-300€. Flats in the city centre usually are around 350-400€ for something really really decent. (I live 3 minutes by bike from the faculty in a 400€ per month room, 15sqm, with 2 other students and we have a 143sqm2 flat in total with 2 bathrooms). There are many websites that offer student rooms in Maastricht, for example you can check StudentFlatMaastricht which regularly publishes various studios and different student accommodation options in Maastricht.



    Few questions: Are the courses hard? Is it interesting there? How are the girls there?:


    Be prepared, you'll have to study at least a bit to pass the courses.

    Last year we were around 400 students starting the European Law Bachelor and now we're a little over a 130 in the second year. I'm not a genius I can tell you and I'm now into my second year. But I had to study quite a lot for some courses, and on a regular basis (exams every two months). I also had to spend entire nights information for essays. Deadline are sometimes quite tight and you end up with no sleeping on certain days. I'd say the hardest thing when you start university is to get to know what they expect from you. You have to be serious, hard-working, and a little intelligent is always a plus!

    Oh and yes, English is not my mother tongue as you can see, so that added a bit more difficulty to the whole thing.
    I actually slapped myself wtf am I doing in this country? What if you don't speak a lick of Dutch. Is teaching provided in English?
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    Yes the programs in english are in bloody english mate. As in proper english. Lolz
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    (Original post by SamWilsn)
    Hello everyone,

    Just wondering (because I may just be confused) if the fees have gone up from around 1700 euros to 8500?

    Im a UK student and desperately hope they haven't increased by this much!

    Sam
    ..... only if you are from outside the EU. Us 'locals' shall pay 1906 Euro next year. Which is £1625 according to XE.
 
 
 

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