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    (Original post by Lawz-)
    IMO - yes - relative to the US? No.

    The US (understandably IMO cosnidering its size) knows far less about things like global location, foreign cultures and current affairs.

    In addition though, you do hear things like "the home of democracy" which sticks in the craw of some of those in Europe who have had it for far longer than the US.
    Actually, the only countries who've had a parliamentary democracy before the US were Switzerland and ancient Greece. Britain isn't really considered democratic until the mid-19th century.

    (Original post by Lawz-)
    I need to try and find the link - but there was a study done on global location capability in a number of countries. The US was bottom.
    Slovakia is a bit closer to London than it is to New York.
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    (Original post by Bismarck)
    Actually, the only countries who've had a parliamentary democracy before the US were Switzerland and ancient Greece. Britain isn't really considered democratic until the mid-19th century.
    On what basis is that?



    (Original post by Bismarck)
    Slovakia is a bit closer to London than it is to New York.
    Im talking about general global location. Not countries in the EU's backyard.
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    (Original post by Lawz-)
    On what basis is that?
    Parliamentary supremacy, a suffrage mostly unrestricted by wealth or property ownership, the ability of citizens to influence policy, etc. For example, the democratic peace theorists (the ones who claim there has never been a war between two democracies) claim that the War of 1812 was not between two democracies.

    Im talking about general global location. Not countries in the EU's backyard.
    Well Mexico and Canada are the only countries within several thousand miles of most Americans.
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    (Original post by Bismarck)
    Parliamentary supremacy,
    In effect, Parliament in the UK was supreme before the US ruled themselves.

    (Original post by Bismarck)
    a suffrage mostly unrestricted by wealth or property ownership,
    And yet it excluded women and blacks.

    (Original post by Bismarck)
    the ability of citizens to influence policy, etc. For example, the democratic peace theorists (the ones who claim there has never been a war between two democracies) claim that the War of 1812 was not between two democracies.
    I know of the claim. Democracy is of course a relative term as is "influence on policy". The US neither created the idea of a parliamentary democracy, nor did it implement it first. Indeed, the first Parliamentary system in the UK convened as far back as the 13th century under Henry III.

    (Original post by Bismarck)
    Well Mexico and Canada are the only countries within several thousand miles of most Americans.
    Proximity was not relevant to the test. I imagine that more Brits could point out Egypt on a map than Americans.
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    (Original post by Lawz-)
    California. Trust me - anyone who heard her would be in no doubt of where she was from.
    From the San Fernando Valley area of Los Angeles, California, by any chance? I can't even imagine what Brits would think of the way girls from that area speak. Even some older Americans sometimes struggle to understand them

    (Original post by Lawz-)
    I need to try and find the link - but there was a study done on global location capability in a number of countries. The US was bottom.
    Bottom among first word countries? It wouldn't surprise me. Still, there are ways of measuring intelligence other than having someone label countries on a blank map. It really only takes a few hours to sit down with a globe and memorize the geographic locations of every country. I know because I got a globe as a birthday present as a kid and pretty much memorized the whole damn thing in 2 days. I still don't think that made me any more intelligent than I was a week earlier.

    The US produced Bill Gates, one of the most brilliant minds of our time and a true revolutionary. Even so, the company still lost millions in India because of an unbelievably stupid geography mistake.
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    I love the amount of people posting anecdotal evidence in this thread and claiming it is God's truth.

    By the way, a few of you are grossly inflating the amount of hatred in France of Americans. If any foreigner goes to France and makes a small effort to speak the language then they will be welcomed heartily. I dont want to hear that your auntie's friend went and was served by a grumpy old man at Monoprix... :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Phonicsdude)
    I love the amount of people posting anecdotal evidence in this thread and claiming it is God's truth.

    :rolleyes:
    When discussing a topic like this, all points of view are "anecdotal evidence"

    Even BBC's "what the world thinks of america" annual slugfests are based on opinions of people in non US countries...not "facts"

    some intresting thoughts from americans that currently live in the UK, on thier experiences

    http://observer.guardian.co.uk/focus...080997,00.html

    http://everydaystranger.mu.nu/archives/026069.html

    Let's face it, Mrs. Miniver is DEAD.

    http://www.samizdata.net/blog/archives/007919.html
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    (Original post by djchak)
    When discussing a topic like this, all points of view are "anecdotal evidence"

    Even BBC's "what the world thinks of america" annual slugfests are based on opinions of people in non US countries...not "facts"

    some intresting thoughts from americans that currently live in the UK, on thier experiences

    http://observer.guardian.co.uk/focus...080997,00.html

    http://everydaystranger.mu.nu/archives/026069.html

    Let's face it, Mrs. Miniver is DEAD.

    http://www.samizdata.net/blog/archives/007919.html
    Where does the guardian find these Americans who write these articles? "...there's a growing scepticism about this gun-toting, electric-chairing land..." :rolleyes:
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    Where there's an expat there's a way///
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    (Original post by kizer)
    Britain is such a small place I would think 'visitor' is a better word for someone visiting London: If I went to Edinburgh I wouldn't see myself as a tourist, even if it is technically the right term. Maybe that's just me.
    um..."britain is such a small place".
    it is? how big a place does it have to be before you become a tourist? given that you can't even see all the london attraction in a week, let alone the delights to be found elsewhere in the country.
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    (Original post by Lawz-)
    IMO - yes - relative to the US? No.

    The US (understandably IMO cosnidering its size) knows far less about things like global location, foreign cultures and current affairs.

    In addition though, you do hear things like "the home of democracy" which sticks in the craw of some of those in Europe who have had it for far longer than the US.

    I like the US and Americans, **** I am marrying one, but it is IMO the case that Americans are more in love with the morality and righteousness of their NATION (not culture like the French) than any other European country, and partiotism of that ilk often comes across as arrogant especially given the relative paucity of knowledge of foreign affairs in the US.

    I dont think any of that makes Americans bad people or worthy of abuse, nor indeed do I think it holds true for all Americans, but it is an honest observation.

    IN truth I get along better with Ameircans that Brits. I much prefer them
    you know its totally true that americans have little idea about global geography compared to some other developed countries.
    However.
    considering america is broadly the size of europe, and americans oft know the entire geography of america (in my experience) incl just about all the states, where eacyh is inr elation to each other, major towns and geographical landmarks in each, and even roads connecting...
    Can the average Brit say the same about Europe..?
    methinks not.
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    (Original post by kizer)
    Fair enough. Do American tourists on the tube never grate at all?
    not an iote as much the chavs playing music out of their horrible mobile phones.
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    The global geography point was not by way of saying Americans are dumb. Far from it.

    But it IS by way of saying that they have less knowledge and curiosity about people, affairs, and issues outside of their borders. There are explanations for that, but it remains a truism of sorts.
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    (Original post by Lawz-)
    The global geography point was not by way of saying Americans are dumb. Far from it.

    But it IS by way of saying that they have less knowledge and curiosity about people, affairs, and issues outside of their borders. There are explanations for that, but it remains a truism of sorts.
    I think part of the reason for seemingly insular thinking among Americans is the effort to overlook where everyone's ancestors came from, because there is no nationally shared background. There's a rather amusing, albeit somewhat bombastic, essay by PJ O'Rourke on the American foreign policy, or the lack of it. Still, I think the same can be applied to the general American wariness of being overly international.

    Americans hate foreign policy. Americans hate foreign policy because Americans hate foreigners. Americans hate foreigners because Americans are foreigners. We all come from foreign lands, even if we came 10,000 years ago on a land bridge across the Bering Strait.

    America is not "globally conscious" or "multi-cultural." Americans didn't come to America to be Limey Poofters, Frog-Eaters, Bucket Heads, Micks, Spicks, Sheenies or Wogs. If we'd wanted foreign entanglements, we would have stayed home. Or - in the case of those of us who were shipped to America against our will - as slaves, exiles, or transported prisoners - we would have gone back.
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    (Original post by psychic_satori)
    I think part of the reason for seemingly insular thinking among Americans is the effort to overlook where everyone's ancestors came from, because there is no nationally shared background. There's a rather amusing, albeit somewhat bombastic, essay by PJ O'Rourke on the American foreign policy, or the lack of it. Still, I think the same can be applied to the general American wariness of being overly international.
    Liberia, land of the free slaves of america.
    what a dump...
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    Sorry?
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    The american empire is dieing, all they have left is the military and hence are using it.

    Soon they won't be able to afford it and then they will be just another country.
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    (Original post by Tina_O)
    The american empire is dieing, all they have left is the military and hence are using it.

    Soon they won't be able to afford it and then they will be just another country.
    That and their economic clout, their cultural dominance.. and a number of other very important things.

    In what way does the US have an empire and in what way is it dying?
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    (Original post by Tina_O)
    The american empire is dieing, all they have left is the military and hence are using it.

    Soon they won't be able to afford it and then they will be just another country.
    Well then, good bye America, and HELLO CHINA!

    I'm sure you will much prefer that.
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    (Original post by Lawz-)
    That and their economic clout, their cultural dominance.. and a number of other very important things.

    In what way does the US have an empire and in what way is it dying?
    some of my old profs were always comparing the americans and romans and their use of proxy governments.
 
 
 
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