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    (Original post by gman10)
    Cannot believe the exam is tomorrow - Sooo nervous because I need an A and cannot afford to muck up tips tips tips pleeaasse!
    I said this to someone earlier: The examiner will mark positively, and be looking for certain criteria, so if you make sure you use, for example, words like 'metaphor', 'simile', 'juxtaposition' etc, obviously in the right context, then they will tick those and reward you for them. Also, you need to engage with the language, so talk about general themes, but make sure you focus in on the language as well to score higher in AO2. When using critics, try to engage with them rather than just quoting them - for example you could use their opinion to try and shape your argument. And lastly, you need to include contextual, so using signpost words which relate to your studied writers will help you to fulfil this. My poet, for example, is Marvell, so I try to use words and phrases like 'Metaphysical', 'Renaissance' and 'The Fall of Man' as often as I can to get marks, without overdoing it.
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    (Original post by binxgillam)
    I said this to someone earlier: The examiner will mark positively, and be looking for certain criteria, so if you make sure you use, for example, words like 'metaphor', 'simile', 'juxtaposition' etc, obviously in the right context, then they will tick those and reward you for them. Also, you need to engage with the language, so talk about general themes, but make sure you focus in on the language as well to score higher in AO2. When using critics, try to engage with them rather than just quoting them - for example you could use their opinion to try and shape your argument. And lastly, you need to include contextual, so using signpost words which relate to your studied writers will help you to fulfil this. My poet, for example, is Marvell, so I try to use words and phrases like 'Metaphysical', 'Renaissance' and 'The Fall of Man' as often as I can to get marks, without overdoing it.

    Good advice, any top tips on marvell? HELP basically, pastroral explanation perhaps? And are you by any chance linking it to volpone? pls say yes
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    (Original post by binxgillam)
    I wouldn't say that outright, because there isn't strong evidence, but it is certainly probable. They used boy actors because women were not permitted to perform on stage in Shakespeare's time, as it was considered improper, and a boy was preferable to a man because their voice would not yet have broken, so they would be able to play a more believable woman.
    sorry to be a pain but how would you apply that contextual point and what would you say it shows?
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    (Original post by Cest la vie)
    sorry to be a pain but how would you apply that contextual point and what would you say it shows?
    I'd apply it to a contextual point by saying that Cleopatra is a very complex character, and also one who has a large amount of sexual allure, so it would take a skilled actor to do justice to the part. You could then bring in the point that Shakespeare may have had a skilled boy actor in his troupe, as he wrote three plays with strong female characters in them in a row. Hope this helps xxx
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    (Original post by Beth_Armitage)
    Good advice, any top tips on marvell? HELP basically, pastroral explanation perhaps? And are you by any chance linking it to volpone? pls say yes
    I am linking it to Volpone I'm the person gave you some help on links between the two earlier . In terms of pastoral explanation, you can talk about the contrast between city and nature, which was a large part of the Pastoral tradition, and was something which was outlined by Virgil (a classical poet who influenced the Pastoral tradition) in his 'Eclogues'. You can also talk about the phrase 'Et in Arcadia Ego' which means 'Even, in Paradise, I (am)', 'I' being Death speaking, and that this was a common theme in Pastoral poems: that even in paradise, death is present. This is shown by Marvell when he speaks of death at the end of Damon the Mower: 'For Death thou art a mower too', which conveys the presence of death in the mower's Eden-like garden atmosphere.
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    Good luck tomorrow everyone!! Very last minute, I know, but I'm seriously lacking in critics for The Rivals and can't seem to find any online or in my notes. Does anybody have any?
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    does anyone have an essay plan as to how lear is a tragic hero? I have information but I dont know how to structure it.
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    (Original post by robert365)
    does anyone have an essay plan as to how lear is a tragic hero? I have information but I dont know how to structure it.
    if you tell me the information i can help you structure it because i dont have the information hahaha
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    Hey wife of bath people...http://www.sfsu.edu/~medieval/Volume5/Baumgardner.html that's a link to a page that I found I don't actually know what it is it looks like some long essay on the wife of bath, but as you go through it it mentions loads of critical views by different people! Thought it would be worth a read
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    (Original post by butterflylights)
    Good luck tomorrow everyone!! Very last minute, I know, but I'm seriously lacking in critics for The Rivals and can't seem to find any online or in my notes. Does anybody have any?
    If anyone's doing King Lear, Wife of Bath and Rivals and struggling for quotes from the texts, or AO3 and 4, here are my revision notes:

    King Lear:
    https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B9w1...it?usp=sharing (Lear quotes by character)

    https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B9w1...it?usp=sharing (critics... oh my god this is ridiculously long, even I'm not using this to revise, but if you're lacking in Lear critics, might be good to have a skim?)

    Rivals:
    https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B9w1...it?usp=sharing (it's really long, sorry D: )

    Wife of Bath:
    https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B9w1...it?usp=sharing (ditto)

    'Essential' WOB and Rivals quotes (obviously just my opinion so don't freak out if you haven't got these haha, and I didn't finish this one so there are more that I would add but it's a starter): https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B9w1...hQeXdmSms/edit
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    (Original post by antonia95)
    What sort of vague structure would you follow for this essay?
    I did this essay after I posted it haha I agree with what other people have said.

    'Disguise is used only by honest characters.'

    Intro - paradoxical statement, as Pavzky said, and considering honest intentions
    1 - Edgar's disguise and whether he's an honest character and uses the disguise honestly (doesn't reveal himself to his dad, for instance; Schwehn says he 'becomes cruel and egotistical'); compare to Hamlet's feigned madness
    2 - Kent's disguise and contrasting him, he is clearly the most honest character (Coleridge called him 'the closest to perfect goodness of all Shakespeare's characters')
    3 - Edmund is honest with the audience (unlike Edgar) but doesn't use a disguise, just deceit, what does this mean etc. I probably went a bit off the point here tbh.
    4 - the Fool uses the diguise of being a jester to try to impart the wisest words in the play, without getting in trouble from Lear.
    Conclusion - disguise is mostly used by honest characters.

    I also tried to link it to big themes throughout, e.g. Albion is so upside-down that Edgar and Kent, as honest characters, are forced to take on disguises just to get by.

    After I did this, though, I talked to my teacher and she said it was a really interesting title because in comedy, disguise is often seen as a norm (Twelfth Night, for example), but in tragedy, it's often a testament to evilness, but not so much in Lear; more like it's an example of the invertedness of the nation.
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    (Original post by robert365)
    does anyone have an essay plan as to how lear is a tragic hero? I have information but I dont know how to structure it.
    I've attached an essay I wrote on the previous page. Just search for my name

    Hopefully the structure's quite clear. I've made 3 points and put in a psychoanalytic reading.
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    What would you write for Lear is a "man more sinned against than sinnning" Discuss. What points would you make? Oh, and if anyone has an an essay on this would thay like to post it pretty please?
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    (Original post by TSR_Monique)
    What would you write for Lear is a "man more sinned against than sinnning" Discuss. What points would you make? Oh, and if anyone has an an essay on this would thay like to post it pretty please?
    Saw this question in the back of my King Lear text xD

    Off the top of my head...

    - Intro - the events in the play definitely show Lear has taken the brunt of it. His actions seem minor in comparison

    - Point 1: his decision to divide his kingdom and when he banishes Cordelia and Kent (despite them being two of the truest characters in the play)
    - Point 2: Goneril and Regan's treatment of him. That would, on its own, answer the question. Filial disobedience, overturning the natural order etc. [Put in Marxist reading here]
    - Point 3: Lear's madness and his (albeit pathetic/lackluster) attempts at making amends shows he is trying to repent his sins. His ability to see clearly in times of madness and when he yearns for Cordelia etc. can cancel out his sins (to an extent)

    - Conclude - he has been sinned against far more than he has sinned himself. Was due to moral blindness (hamartia - fatal flaw i.e. Aristotle's tragic hero).
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    Good luck tomorrow everyone!!
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    The only tips I can give for tomorrow are:
    -read the questions carefully
    - refer back to your theme: Gothic/pastoral
    - Make a plan at the beginning of an essay
    - If you only have e.g. 10 mins left and are running out of time, bulletpoint, they wont give you as many marks but the examiners put it into consideration
    - Make sure you spell characters names right (Particularly if you're doing Doctor Faustus and have to spell Mephostophilis)
    - Try not to use predictable quotes e.g. "I am Heathcliff" - Wuthering Heights

    Good luck everybody, lets hope for a nice paper! (Although my dream question came up in January for section B :/ )
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    anyone got any predictions for Antony and Cleopatra
    and Tis a pity shes a whore with Wife of Bath?
    So nervous for this exam!
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    (Original post by kate_louise21)
    anyone got any predictions for Antony and Cleopatra
    and Tis a pity shes a whore with Wife of Bath?
    So nervous for this exam!
    I'm not doing Anthony and Cleopatra, but I can only hope that religion / marriage / women / sex comes up for Tis Pity and WoB!
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    (Original post by kate_louise21)
    anyone got any predictions for Antony and Cleopatra
    and Tis a pity shes a whore with Wife of Bath?
    So nervous for this exam!
    I'm doing Tis Pity and WoB and reaaallly hope that women come up. would be my dream question!!
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    Does anyone have any critical opinion for The White Devil? I've so little for TWD but have more than enough for Blake, so hard to find any Webster that isn't related to Malfi.
 
 
 
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