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    (Original post by DeadUnicorn)
    i think they just hypnotised me to focus now wow :eek:
    They had the same effect on me as well


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    (Original post by andersson)
    I agree, Carl Sagan, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Bill Nye and Brian Cox are/were brilliant at that :adore:
    There's also Lawrence Krauss and Michio Kaku

    If you haven't seen this, then I recommend you watch it when you have time (it features Bill Nye, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Richard Dawkins, Brian Greene and Lawrence Krauss and believe me, it is very entertaining to watch Neil deGrass Tyson in this ) :

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40YIIaF1qiw
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    (Original post by BP_Tranquility)
    There's also Lawrence Krauss and Michio Kaku

    If you haven't seen this, then I recommend you watch it when you have time (it features Bill Nye, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Richard Dawkins, Brian Greene and Lawrence Krauss and believe me, it is very entertaining to watch Neil deGrass Tyson in this ) :

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40YIIaF1qiw
    I've never heard of Lawrence Krauss but I love Michio Kaku - I have his book! We can't forget Stephen Hawking or Jim Al-Khalili either...

    I'll treat myself to watch that after exams :cool:
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    (Original post by andersson)
    I've never heard of Lawrence Krauss but I love Michio Kaku - I have his book! We can't forget Stephen Hawking or Jim Al-Khalili either...

    I'll treat myself to watch that after exams :cool:
    Oh and there's Richard Feynman as well

    Lawrence Krauss is like Neil deGrasse Tyson in many ways, but still different in his approach (clip)...This is a clip from the video I gave you before )

    Yeah, okay, I'll let you get back to revising (1 day and a half! :rolleyes: )
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    (Original post by BP_Tranquility)
    Oh and there's Richard Feynman as well

    Lawrence Krauss is like Neil deGrasse Tyson in many ways, but still different in his approach (clip)...This is a clip from the video I gave you before )

    Yeah, okay, I'll let you get back to revising (1 day and a half! :rolleyes: )
    Oh man, so many distractions! :cry2: I have to resist the temptation to watch them until after exams... Thanks though, cya
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    Just thought of a smart 6 marker for P5: explaining why colliding particles cause pressure using equations (e.g. F=m*v, change in M = m*change in V and force = change in M/time) where you would talk about how gas particles have velocity and mass then use those equations to explain how they exert a force on the walls of a container.
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    To calculate the output voltage in a potential divider circuit, is the equation Vout=(R2)/(R1+R2) x Vin or is it (R1)/(R1+R2) x Vin ?

    Thanks



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    (Original post by BP_Tranquility)
    To calculate the output voltage in a potential divider circuit, is the equation Vout=(R2)/(R1+R2) x Vin or is it (R1)/(R1+R2) x Vin ?

    Thanks



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    The former. So the bigger R2's resistance, the lower the reduction of voltage is
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    (Original post by andersson)
    The former. So the bigger R2's resistance, the lower the reduction of voltage is
    I see, thanks
    The specification doesn't even have the formula on it so I guess we have to remember it


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    (Original post by andersson)
    x
    Does your revision guide have any information on this (mine isn't too clear on it)? It's in the Sharing topic for P6.

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    Could someone please explain potential dividers to me please? I don't get how we're supposed to know whether V(out) is after R1 or after R2. In the questions in my book, sometimes it asks for the voltage out of R1, and sometimes it asks for the voltage out of R2 - how would I know which to work out?
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    (Original post by BP_Tranquility)
    Does your revision guide have any information on this (mine isn't too clear on it)? It's in the Sharing topic for P6.

    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1371396718.974134.jpg
Views: 66
Size:  175.6 KB


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    (Original post by Knowing)
    Could someone please explain potential dividers to me please? I don't get how we're supposed to know whether V(out) is after R1 or after R2. In the questions in my book, sometimes it asks for the voltage out of R1, and sometimes it asks for the voltage out of R2 - how would I know which to work out?
    I believe it's the same? Just use the equation


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    (Original post by BP_Tranquility)
    Does your revision guide have any information on this (mine isn't too clear on it)? It's in the Sharing topic for P6.

    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1371396718.974134.jpg
Views: 66
Size:  175.6 KB


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    What don't you get? Transistors, LEDs or what?
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    (Original post by andersson)
    What don't you get? Transistors, LEDs or what?
    How a transistor can be used to switch on an LED and how you can explain this using a diagram (like the one shown in the image)

    Edit: just realised it's actually in the It's Logical section


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    (Original post by Knowing)
    Could someone please explain potential dividers to me please? I don't get how we're supposed to know whether V(out) is after R1 or after R2. In the questions in my book, sometimes it asks for the voltage out of R1, and sometimes it asks for the voltage out of R2 - how would I know which to work out?
    I don't know if this will help but this is my description on my P6 mindmap:

    http://gyazo.com/febb4cc3dd4cea0fc4d9e05d5808da75
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    Do you guys print out the whole spec? A4 size?


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    (Original post by benwalters1996)
    Do you guys print out the whole spec? A4 size?


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    No, I set the printer so it printed 4 pages from the spec onto one A4 page


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    (Original post by BP_Tranquility)
    How a transistor can be used to switch on an LED and how you can explain this using a diagram (like the one shown in the image)


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    A transistor is a tiny electrical switch - so think of it like a light switch but it's turned on or off depending on whether an electric current is supplied to the 'base' or not. When an electric current is supplied to the 'base', the transistor 'closes' (like a light switch closing and completing the circuit, turning on the light) and allows a larger current to flow through the 'collector' and the 'emitter'. In this case the transistor is supplied with a small current (due to the resistor in series with it) which allows the current to flow through the LED because it has 'closed'.

    If that didn't help then maybe my description of it on my mindmap will:

    http://gyazo.com/cd32ec1db00f02b7d4dc79e48afc06c9
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    Thank you!


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