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    Good luck to everyone with UCL interviews tomorrow, see you there! x


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    Good luck to everyone doing interviews for UCL In the coming hours!hope they go well
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    The interviewers and lady that runs the course at UCL are all really lovely and friendly so don't be scared! It's a lot better than anticipated! X


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    (Original post by Sgt5)
    The interviewers and lady that runs the course at UCL are all really lovely and friendly so don't be scared! It's a lot better than anticipated! X


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    Thanks for this Sgt5 - really good to hear! And good luck to everyone. Fingers crossed we all get the news we're hoping for over the next few weeks.


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    (Original post by Sgt5)
    The interviewers and lady that runs the course at UCL are all really lovely and friendly so don't be scared! It's a lot better than anticipated! X


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    This made me feel so much better so thank you!! Obviously we're not expecting monsters, it's just so nerve racking that all your hard work in your undergrad and time spent volunteering and work experience finally culminates in a 20 minute interview!! Absolutely terrified! Good luck everyone!!!
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    I submitted not before deadline and my references submitted their part the day before! So hoping that won't have made too much of a difference. Getting frustrated though as I don't seem to get any feedback as to why I didn't get in to the other uni's..so its hard to figure out what to improve! Guess we will know soon enough...eeeekkk!!!
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    Hi, I've got an interview with Essex on the 6th of May, it's so far away but I'm still nervous. I don't know what to expect apart from the literacy and numeracy test.
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    Hi all,

    I have created a thread for everyone who has accepted a place on the SLT postgraduate course starting Sept 2014!...

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...20postgraduate

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    Hi Everyone

    Just wanted some advice about applying to do a post-grad degree in speech and language therapy.

    I'm currently doing a degree in the arts. I do enjoy design etc. Though, I have come to realise that I have lost my passion in pursuing career as a designer. ( I am nearing the end of my degree..so too late to drop out now )

    My son has a severe speech and language delay, due to the fact he has verbal dyspraxia. So the encounters of attending speech and language sessions for a number of years with my son, reading numerous books relating to speech and language, meeting speech therapists, going on courses to learn about Makaton, communication workshops, meeting kids and adults with speech issues etc. Has sparked an interest to maybe pursue a career as a speech therapists.

    I have decided to take a one year or two year break after completing my degree, if I wish to do a Masters. This is so that I can get much experience and to be sure if I want to pursue a career as a speech therapist.

    Out of city, UCL and reading. Which of these three universities have a much more practical approach?

    I always wanted to know how much experience do you need to have? So that I have a high chance getting accepted by the university.

    If anyone is currently or was doing a master in speech therapy… how many days a week would you attend the lessons?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Adesola)
    [...] Just wanted some advice about applying to do a post-grad degree in speech and language therapy.

    I'm currently doing a degree in the arts. I do enjoy design etc. Though, I have come to realise that I have lost my passion in pursuing career as a designer. ( I am nearing the end of my degree..so too late to drop out now )

    My son has a severe speech and language delay, due to the fact he has verbal dyspraxia. So the encounters of attending speech and language sessions for a number of years with my son, reading numerous books relating to speech and language, meeting speech therapists, going on courses to learn about Makaton, communication workshops, meeting kids and adults with speech issues etc. Has sparked an interest to maybe pursue a career as a speech therapists.

    I have decided to take a one year or two year break after completing my degree, if I wish to do a Masters. This is so that I can get much experience and to be sure if I want to pursue a career as a speech therapist.

    Out of city, UCL and reading. Which of these three universities have a much more practical approach?

    I always wanted to know how much experience do you need to have? So that I have a high chance getting accepted by the university.

    If anyone is currently or was doing a master in speech therapy… how many days a week would you attend the lessons? [...]
    My main concern would be your academic background. The MSc is typically for people who have a related background in biomedical sciences, linguistics, modern languages, or psychology. This also feeds into the workload. How are you going to convince them you can pick up so many new topics when the workload is so high?
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    What evantej said. I believe the entry requirements pages for all of the postgrad programmes say that your undergrad should be in a related field. I have a vague memory of one or maybe two saying that they'd consider applicants with an unrelated first degree if they had a huge amount of relevant experience though. There are several universities in the UK with BSc programmes that might be more suited for your academic background As the BSc takes 3-4 years as opposed to 2, the workload is much less intense, which might also be helpful if you have other commitments!

    (Original post by Adesola)
    Out of city, UCL and reading. Which of these three universities have a much more practical approach?
    Absolutely City, from what I've gathered. While all of the programmes have practical sides, UCL and Reading seem to be particularly renowned for being more academic.

    (Original post by Adesola)
    I always wanted to know how much experience do you need to have? So that I have a high chance getting accepted by the university.
    I think it varies a lot from applicant to applicant. Some people have only shadowed and undertaken brief volunteering placements; others have worked as Speech and Language Therapy Assistants for years. What seems to matter the most is what you have learned from the experience you have and how this will benefit you during the programme.
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    (Original post by evantej)
    My main concern would be your academic background. The MSc is typically for people who have a related background in biomedical sciences, linguistics, modern languages, or psychology. This also feeds into the workload. How are you going to convince them you can pick up so many new topics when the workload is so high?
    Hi

    I don't really understand. As I had a friend, who had an illustration degree. But changed her mind to do speech therapy. In the end she got accepted into UCL.

    Plus, looking at other forums and speaking to speech therapists.( relating to taking a post-grad into speech therapy) a lot of the people commented that some people did not have a related degree in that subject and was still able to get into the course.
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    (Original post by Laice)
    What evantej said. I believe the entry requirements pages for all of the postgrad programmes say that your undergrad should be in a related field. I have a vague memory of one or maybe two saying that they'd consider applicants with an unrelated first degree if they had a huge amount of relevant experience though. There are several universities in the UK with BSc programmes that might be more suited for your academic background As the BSc takes 3-4 years as opposed to 2, the workload is much less intense, which might also be helpful if you have other commitments!



    Absolutely City, from what I've gathered. While all of the programmes have practical sides, UCL and Reading seem to be particularly renowned for being more academic.



    I think it varies a lot from applicant to applicant. Some people have only shadowed and undertaken brief volunteering placements; others have worked as Speech and Language Therapy Assistants for years. What seems to matter the most is what you have learned from the experience you have and how this will benefit you during the programme.

    Hi

    Thanks for your detailed answer.

    I would not take another undergrad, simply because I do not want to spend another 3- 4 years at University again.

    I will go to the open day at the Universities to talk to the lectures if it's worth me applying to the course. Simply because my academic background is unrelated…plus ask about how intensive the course is.

    Thanks everyone for the advice.
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    (Original post by evantej)
    My main concern would be your academic background. The MSc is typically for people who have a related background in biomedical sciences, linguistics, modern languages, or psychology. This also feeds into the workload. How are you going to convince them you can pick up so many new topics when the workload is so high?


    Didn't answer your question..sorry.

    Hopefully, because of the experience with my son and the millions of books I've read about speech therapy, taking a number of short courses regarding communication etc. This may convince them that I have experience with these kind of topics.

    The workload..I'm not too sure about. Though! hopefully the universities would have an open day about this course, so that I can ask them these question.

    Thanks for the advice!
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    (Original post by Adesola)
    Hi

    Thanks for your detailed answer.

    I would not take another undergrad, simply because I do not want to spend another 3- 4 years at University again.

    I will go to the open day at the Universities to talk to the lectures if it's worth me applying to the course. Simply because my academic background is unrelated…plus ask about how intensive the course is.

    Thanks everyone for the advice.
    Hello!

    Just to clarify, you don't need a relevant degree to apply to UCL or City.

    The UCL website says: "We have students who have successfully completed the course with undergraduate degrees in many different subjects, including archaeology, law, anthropology, and geography. You can apply if you hold any UK honours degree at a 2.2 ... However be aware that the majority of students accepted onto the course hold a 2:1 degree or higher."

    The City website says: "While many applicants have a degree in a related subject area, such as linguistics or psychology, this is not a pre-requisite. Students on the course come from a range of academic backgrounds, both in the arts and sciences."

    You'll need to ensure you get plenty of experience, preferably with a mix of adults and children in a variety of settings. It sounds like you're already off to a pretty good start!

    Be aware that both courses are extremely intensive - I think you're at uni/on placement virtually every day and are expected to work on coursework/revision etc in the evenings and over the weekend.

    Definitely go to the open evenings - they're really useful, and the staff there are happy to answer any questions.

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by Adesola)
    Hi Everyone

    Just wanted some advice about applying to do a post-grad degree in speech and language therapy.

    I'm currently doing a degree in the arts. I do enjoy design etc. Though, I have come to realise that I have lost my passion in pursuing career as a designer. ( I am nearing the end of my degree..so too late to drop out now )

    My son has a severe speech and language delay, due to the fact he has verbal dyspraxia. So the encounters of attending speech and language sessions for a number of years with my son, reading numerous books relating to speech and language, meeting speech therapists, going on courses to learn about Makaton, communication workshops, meeting kids and adults with speech issues etc. Has sparked an interest to maybe pursue a career as a speech therapists.

    I have decided to take a one year or two year break after completing my degree, if I wish to do a Masters. This is so that I can get much experience and to be sure if I want to pursue a career as a speech therapist.

    Out of city, UCL and reading. Which of these three universities have a much more practical approach?

    I always wanted to know how much experience do you need to have? So that I have a high chance getting accepted by the university.

    If anyone is currently or was doing a master in speech therapy… how many days a week would you attend the lessons?

    Thanks







    On City and UCL's website they will accept any degree, as long as you achieve a 2:1. However, UCL states that they will also accept students with a 2:2 with an extensive amount of relevant experience.

    Reading will only accept related subjects such as linguistics.

    So you are able to apply to city and UCL.



    During city's open day they said that It will be 4 days a week. Teaching times vary from 9-5.30, 11-4, and 11-5.30. The placements are from 9-5.

    I wish you all the best.
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    (Original post by Katehb)
    Hello!

    Just to clarify, you don't need a relevant degree to apply to UCL or City.

    The UCL website says: "We have students who have successfully completed the course with undergraduate degrees in many different subjects, including archaeology, law, anthropology, and geography. You can apply if you hold any UK honours degree at a 2.2 ... However be aware that the majority of students accepted onto the course hold a 2:1 degree or higher."

    The City website says: "While many applicants have a degree in a related subject area, such as linguistics or psychology, this is not a pre-requisite. Students on the course come from a range of academic backgrounds, both in the arts and sciences."

    You'll need to ensure you get plenty of experience, preferably with a mix of adults and children in a variety of settings. It sounds like you're already off to a pretty good start!

    Be aware that both courses are extremely intensive - I think you're at uni/on placement virtually every day and are expected to work on coursework/revision etc in the evenings and over the weekend.

    Definitely go to the open evenings - they're really useful, and the staff there are happy to answer any questions.

    Good luck!

    Thanks!

    Pheww!, I looked at both of their websites carefully and they did say this!

    Thanks so much!
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    (Original post by Crazy_chick1)
    On City and UCL's website they will accept any degree, as long as you achieve a 2:1. However, UCL states that they will also accept students with a 2:2 with an extensive amount of relevant experience.

    Reading will only accept related subjects such as linguistics.

    So you are able to apply to city and UCL.



    During city's open day they said that It will be 4 days a week. Teaching times vary from 9-5.30, 11-4, and 11-5.30. The placements are from 9-5.

    I wish you all the best.
    Hi

    Thanks!

    City and UCl would be my first choice, as I don't want to go too far. Shame about Reading, as they have a course module on Speech impairments.

    Yes the teaching times may be an issue…. though I have a year left to decide plus I'm taking a year out after my degree.
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    (Original post by Adesola)
    Thanks!

    Pheww!, I looked at both of their websites carefully and they did say this!

    Thanks so much!
    Ooops, sorry for the slight misinformation! I was much more focussed on the non-London universities when I applied and I should've double-checked UCL/City's entry requirements before replying. Hope I didn't worry you too much

    You definitely seem to have a lot of experience already and a keen interest in the subject matter, so just keep it up and I'm sure either will be lucky to have you Best of luck!
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    (Original post by Adesola)
    Hi

    Thanks!

    City and UCl would be my first choice, as I don't want to go too far. Shame about Reading, as they have a course module on Speech impairments.

    Yes the teaching times may be an issue…. though I have a year left to decide plus I'm taking a year out after my degree.
    City also have a module on speech disorders. I would be surprised if ucl didn't as well!

    You're in 4 days a week 9-5 basically - 3 in Uni and one on placement. It's pretty much full time hours. At city because it's a PGDip though, you have longer holidays as you're not writing a dissertation during those two years.


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