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    Depends on the universities you want to apply to. Oxbridge requires applicants to sit the BMAT for Medicine.
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    (Original post by mo-123)
    Hey guys
    I just wanna ask I would like to apply for medicine next year and I heard about ukcat and bmat.. So which one do I do or do I do both confusedddddd ?!??
    Anyone's help would be much appreciated


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    Have a read

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...dmission_Tests
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    Hey guys, only just found this thread. But how's everyone feeling about results day?
    Personally.. I'm scared ****less !


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    I have 8A* and an A at gcse, does anyone know of they only look at 9 gcses or will I be at a big disadvantage to those people who have say 12A*? Basically do I have a chance of an offer from Edinburgh? (Rekon UKCAT will be pretty good and predicted 4As at a level)
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    (Original post by SavannaC)
    Hey guys, only just found this thread. But how's everyone feeling about results day?
    Personally.. I'm scared ****less !


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    I am petrified! A week tomorrow and Ill know whether I can apply to medicine. Scary stuff!


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    (Original post by Officegirl4)
    I am petrified! A week tomorrow and Ill know whether I can apply to medicine. Scary stuff!


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    IKR! But I don't think you should completely base these results on whether your going to apply for meds. I felt like that too but after talking to a few people and some on TSR, i realised if it's really what you want to do. Then do the UKCAT/BMAT, make sure you have atleast AAA predicted and apply, you can always resit a few modules if need be. Just don't apply to anywhere that ask for specific AS results, that could cause a few complications lol
    I'm sure you've done well anyway


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    (Original post by SavannaC)
    IKR! But I don't think you should completely base these results on whether your going to apply for meds. I felt like that too but after talking to a few people and some on TSR, i realised if it's really what you want to do. Then do the UKCAT/BMAT, make sure you have atleast AAA predicted and apply, you can always resit a few modules if need be. Just don't apply to anywhere that ask for specific AS results, that could cause a few complications lol
    I'm sure you've done well anyway


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    I'm from Scotland so these ones are the ones that count pretty much need AAAAA or AAAAB if I want to stand a chance. No resits

    When do you get your results?


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    (Original post by Officegirl4)
    I'm from Scotland so these ones are the ones that count pretty much need AAAAA or AAAAB if I want to stand a chance. No resits

    When do you get your results?


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    Oh I'm sorry, I don't know anything about the Scottish system. I'm sure you've put in the work and hopefully you get the grades you need. Best of luck to you.

    We get our results on the 15th August.. Wbu?


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    (Original post by SavannaC)
    Oh I'm sorry, I don't know anything about the Scottish system. I'm sure you've put in the work and hopefully you get the grades you need. Best of luck to you.

    We get our results on the 15th August.. Wbu?


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    It's alright. Sucks that the systems are so different. Good luck to you too!

    We get ours on the 6th August so that should be interesting


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    (Original post by Officegirl4)
    It's alright. Sucks that the systems are so different. Good luck to you too!

    We get ours on the 6th August so that should be interesting


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    Yeah it really does, and thanks. Ahh that's so close, I really hope you do well *fingers crossed*


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    'Aptitude test
    Applicants will be required to take the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT). This is a written test provides measures of Verbal Reasoning (VR), Quantitative Reasoning (QR), Abstract Reasoning (AR), Decision Analysis (DA) and from 2013 onwards a Situational Judgement Test. The test must be taken in the same admissions cycle as the application and the result cannot be carried forward to another year. Further details are available on the UKCAT website (http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/). The scores will be scrutinised when selectors consider the rest of the application alongside the personal statement, academic background and referee’s statement. Leeds uses a banded scoring system based on VT, QR, AR and DA. We do not operate a “threshold” or “cut-off” system. We are still assessing the SJT to see how to use it.'

    Nice to see Leeds taking so much care when proof-reading their own admissions policy. :cool:
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    2014 Medicine Hopefuls

    Hey TSR Medics


    Looking around the forum and most courses have like an aspirational thread for 2014 chemists vets etc. So I thought why not make one for medicine.

    This is the time where most applicants will be taking their UKCAT or BMAT or both as one of the final processes to get into medical school.

    Well... My names Ahmed and I have from birth contemplated about being a medic or chemical engineer (petroleum engineer) Through a lot of research I made my up in Yr12 to do medicine.

    I am currently studying Chemistry Physics Maths FMaths
    but hope to drop FMaths and pick up Biology next year as an AS & A2

    Hoping to get AAAA or AAAB in June but I think I will probably get AABB or AABC, yet to do my UKCAT the pressure is overwhelming. I have an idea of the unis I would like to apply to but not 100% sure till the results come out. Below are links to specific University chats if you're interested and be sure to link me to any new ones on the forum so I can add it on here.

    (Original post by alex193)
    For the benefit of anyone who hasn't seen, there's a few university-specific threads on the go as well

    Sheffield
    Leicester
    Barts and The London
    Nottingham A100 and A108
    Southampton BM4 BM5 and BM6
    Plymouth
    Liverpool
    Imperial
    Aberdeen
    Brighton & Sussex

    Current Nottingham student here, if anyone's got questions about Notts or medicine in general I'll do my best to answer
    So I basically created this thread to meet my potential future classmates & medics and to discuss about Offers interviews etc when they are given

    For now what UKCAT has everyone scored & jan exam results etc

    Peace
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    For the benefit of anyone who hasn't seen, there's a few university-specific threads on the go as well

    Sheffield
    Leicester
    Barts and The London
    Nottingham A100 and A108
    Southampton BM4 BM5 and BM6
    Plymouth
    Liverpool
    Imperial
    Aberdeen
    Brighton & Sussex

    Current Nottingham student here, if anyone's got questions about Notts or medicine in general I'll do my best to answer
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    (Original post by alex193)
    For the benefit of anyone who hasn't seen, there's a few university-specific threads on the go as well

    Sheffield
    Leicester
    Barts and The London
    Nottingham A100 and A108
    Southampton BM4 BM5 and BM6
    Plymouth
    Liverpool
    Imperial
    Aberdeen
    Brighton & Sussex

    Current Nottingham student here, if anyone's got questions about Notts or medicine in general I'll do my best to answer
    Ill edit that in thats actually quite useful
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    (Original post by alex193)
    For the benefit of anyone who hasn't seen, there's a few university-specific threads on the go as well

    Sheffield
    Leicester
    Barts and The London
    Nottingham A100 and A108
    Southampton BM4 BM5 and BM6
    Plymouth
    Liverpool
    Imperial
    Aberdeen
    Brighton & Sussex

    Current Nottingham student here, if anyone's got questions about Notts or medicine in general I'll do my best to answer
    Hey there (new to TSR so I have no idea what I'm doing!) I'm going to Nottingham open day in September and I was wondering what you thought of the university and the format of how medicine is taught. Also, do you use cadavers as part of your study? Thanks
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    (Original post by jellycross)
    Hey there (new to TSR so I have no idea what I'm doing!) I'm going to Nottingham open day in September and I was wondering what you thought of the university and the format of how medicine is taught. Also, do you use cadavers as part of your study? Thanks
    Heya,
    I've done a big piece on Notts over on the A100 thread - I've quoted it below I'm loving it, the course is perfect for me and uni life has been entertaining to say the least Yep, we're one of the few schools that still let students dissect - more on that below

    (Original post by alex193)
    Spoiler:
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    Well, it's getting towards the start of the 2014 application cycle so time for a thread! Some of you might recognise me from the 2013 thread - I'm a current Nottingham student about to start year 2, so if you've got any questions about life at the university, the course, or the application process, I'll be happy to help out.

    Spoilered because it's a Wall of TextTM

    About the course

    Spoiler:
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    Nottingham offers a 5 year BMBS course with a compulsory integrated BMedSci in year 3 - this is a unique arrangement amongst UK medical schools, as other universities require you to take a year out to do a BSci. The course is largely lecture and lab based in the first two years, with little PBL. We do have a substantial amount of time in labs and we start clinical placements right from the beginning, which is really good - because we get this early patient interaction, we can start building our confidence and skills right from the first year rather than being thrown straight into clinical placements in year 4!

    Clinical Skills are taught throughout the course in our purpose-built and freshly revamped for 2013 Skills Centre, with drop-in sessions throughout the week, timetabled teaching sessions, and a whole multitude of equipment and staff to help you practice your skills for hospital visits and, of course, OSCEs.

    Nottingham has several teaching hospitals in the Trent Deanery area; the medical school is within the Queens Medical Centre, the largest hospital in the UK and our main teaching hospital. We also use Nottingham City, Derby, Kings Mill and Boston for some teaching: during the first two years, transport is provided to any placements off-campus. We also get allocated to a GP surgery in the area; again, transport is provided for those more than 2 bus rides away. We stick with the same GP and hospital for the whole of first year.

    There are two exam cycles each year, in January/February and May/June. Exams are computer based, with most modules being assessed as end-of-module exams withh little coursework. The exceptions to this are Communication Skills and Professional Development, and the OSCE (clinical exams), which are assessed by coursework and practical examination respectively. The first year does count towards your classification, unlike other subjects, so it is definitely worth working hard - that said, the exams are quite manageable so long as you learn the material and revise sensibly

    Semester 1 (September - December) is mainly biochemistry, behavioural sciences, public health, epidemiology, histology and nerves and muscles, so it's mostly lecture based with quite a lot of lab work (microscopes, putting drugs in each others eyes etc). Although a lot of the content is pretty science-y, the lecturers do a very good job of linking the topics back to medicine, and I found this clinical relevance a great way to keep motivated - if you can see why you're learning all this stuff and how it'll be useful as a doctor, it's encouragement to keep working at it!

    Semester 2 is where it starts to get interesting, with Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Haematology and Clinical Lab Sciences modules. Nottingham is very keen on systems-based learning, meaning that everything is integrated together - for each organ system, we have the lectures on the biochemistry and functions of everything, and that's coupled with what we're doing in the dissection room so we get the structural correlates. Also, we revisit the histology labs for more microscope work and we also learn how to do physical exams (on dummies, then each other, then actual patients!). I found this a very helpful way of doing it, because we cement everything and link it back to what we've done before and what we're doing parallel to it.

    For anatomy, we're one of the few medical schools to get the privilege of doing cadaveric dissections. Personally, I believe that this is the single best tool for learning anatomy that we could possibly have; there is no way one could possibly render the intricacy and interconnectedness of the human body in books or models - getting stuck in, in the most literal sense of the phrase, is far and away the best way to truly appreciate the relationships between the structures of the human body. We work in groups of 10 to a cadaver, 5 at a time, and over the course of the year we dissect, system by system, in tandem with what we're studying in lectures. In the first term of dissection (from January) we examined the anterior chest wall, heart, lungs, mediastinum, anterior neck triangles, axilla, shoulder joint, upper arm, brachial plexus, forearm, hip, thigh, knee, leg and hands and feet. I know this sounds like a lot to get through, but the course is well-structured and in addition to the timetabled sessions, there's drop-in classes for revision where you can use the prosected remains and models to learn. There are few schools that still offer the opportunity to do this, and I certainly think it's the single best way of learning anatomy. Working with human remains is also a part of the experience - we get introduced to the fragility and mortality of the human form, and we're taught not to see the cadavers as specimens or as cases, but as our first patients. We work with them for a whole year, and in a way we're never going to know anyone in such depth again. It's a unique and privileged experience to be able to learn like this, with these donated bodies, and I really feel it's one of the best things Nottingham offers. There's a committal ceremony at the end of the year, where we get a chance to say 'thanks and goodbye' to our donors and often their families which is a very moving way to round off the course; strange as it may sound, you do form a bit of a 'bond' with your cadaver. The first session is a very odd experience - certainly for me, it was the first time I'd ever seen a dead person, let alone cut into one, and I felt terrible about it at first. But as the course goes on and your understanding and dissection skills grow, peeling back the layers, searching for unique variations from the norm, displaying all the parts, becomes very natural and absolutely fascinating. Most groups name their 'silent teachers' which really brings home the human aspect of it as well.

    Second year generally follows the same structure as first year - we get to choose special interest modules in semester 4, which let us learn more about aspects of medicine that interest us. The BMedSci in third year takes up 6 months, and culminates in a 15000 word dissertation about your chosen topic. There are various options for study areas, from anatomy to biochemistry. The second half of third year is taken up by Cinical Phase 1, and years 4 and 5 by CP 2 and 3.

    Generally, the workload is perfectly manageable in the first year - there's nothing that's harder than A level per se, but there is a bit more volume and it's a very different way of learning. As long as you keep up to date with notes (the lecture slides are provided in book form and online), use the teaching resources wisely, and don't leave revision to the last minute it's fine There's still loads of time to get involved with all the awesome stuff going on in med school and the uni - more on that later.



    About the application

    Spoiler:
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    Offers are based on AAA at A-level (biology and chemistry compulsory, general studies and critical thinking don't count), and 6 A at GCSE including sciences at A and English and maths at B. The UKCAT must be taken.

    As with all courses, apply via UCAS. Without going into too much detail, personal statements are an important part of the pre-interview selection proicess, and so it's worth putting effort into making sure your PS is up to scratch. It's worth including why you want to study medicine and backing this up with things you've seen in your work experience - showing you've learned from workex rather than just sitting there like the metaphorical lemon is a big plus, as is volunteer work.

    Nottingham also require you to do an online questionnaire to further explore your motivations for studying medicine and why you want to go to Nottingham. This does count towards whether you'll be called for interview, so it's worth taking seriously!

    The UKCAT has grown in importance at Nottingham; in my application cycle (2012), they only used it to differentiate between borderline candidates, but now it counts for 48% of the pre-interview score. There isn't a cut-off for the UKCAT score - they award points based on your resultss in each of the 4 sections (equally weighted), which they use along with points for your 8 highest GCSEs, the PS, and the online questionnaire to rank all the applicants before interview. At least one candidate from last years thread got an interview with 620, but as always do as well as you can.

    The exact weightings for the different sections that go into your pre-interview score are;
    21% GCSEs
    16% personal statement
    15% online questionnaire
    48% UKCAT

    Around 2700 offers were received last year, with 750 called to interview and 246 places on offer


    About the interview

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    Roughly 1 in 4 applications get called to interview. On the day of the interview, you'll be given a tour of the medical school by a student vounteer (I did 14 groups last year :O ) which is a really good opportunity to grill them about how they've found the course and ask for any last-minute tips. The interview is about 15 minutes, split equally into a structured and unstructured part. Some of the main things they're looking for are motivation and empathy - I honestly can't stress this enough. All the way through, try and see things from others point of view, and use this to back up your motivations for medicine. They have your personal statement with them, but no other details about you, so if you can illustrate your answer to the ubiquitous question of 'Why medicine?' with an example of something you saw in workex, how it made you feel, what you learnt from it, how it inspired you to study medicine and how it'll make you a better doctor, you've made a very impressive case for being offered a place. The structured part of the interview gives you an ethical dilemma and asks you to explain what you'd so in the situation and why - again, they're looking for empathy and rational thinking; it's worth learning a bit about basic ethics (4 principles, capacity to consent, mental competency...).

    If I had to narrow it down to three main things that they're looking for, they'd be 1) an understanding of what it's like to work in medicine (multi-disciplinary teams, patient-centred treatment, holistic attitudes etc), 2) your motivations for wanting to study medicine and 3) empathy. They're not expecting you to know any great deal of sciencey stuff already - we can teach you that. What they want to see is what sort of person you are and how you think. Just don't get caught on a tangent, 15 minutes isn't a long time! The interviewers are nice, they're looking to get the best out of you so they won't try and trick you or catch you out.


    They make a minority of offers very early on, but the bulk come after the end of interviews. The official spiel is something to do with not deciding until they've seen everyone so they don't accidentally exclude any amazing candidates who have later interviews. From my experience, I interviewed in late January and got an offer on the 20-something'th of March.



    About uni life

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    In one word, my first year has been fun. The workload is manageable, there's loads of time to get involved with stuff going on in halls and with societies and sports, and there's certainly lots of things to do in the evenings

    Of course, everything starts off with Freshers Week - the freshers fair tent is open all week and is well worth visiting just to get an idea of what's on offer and pick up a lifetime's worth of free pens. There are different clubs on every night of the week, along with a different fancy dress theme, which was really good fun. The week ends with a grand finale at the Capitol FM arena - I didn't go as I'd come down with the dreaded freshers flu, but I'm assured it was intense Medics are, however, unique in having lectures during freshers week (boo hiss) but there's still plenty of time to go and visit all the stuff on campus and we even have our own little mini-fair in the QMC with all the medic societies. There's socs for literally everybody (Cake Soc anyone? No? Perhaps Homebrewing Society?) and also medic societies (for paediatrics, GPs, anaesthetists etc). I'm in Scrubs, the surgical society, and we have really helpful anatomy revision sessions each week, and I've also learnt how to suture and scrub in and everything - stuff you wouldn't normally be able to do till 5th year!

    Sports-wise, there's loads of uni sports and a good gym and pool right on campus, and we also have special medic teams - I'm a medic rower for example, and the only difference is we're slightly less hardcore and don't schedule sessions for during lectures!

    On the second day, you get allocated a medic 'mum' or 'dad' - a second year mentor who'll look after you, give advice, lend you exam notes... Basically, we've done it before so we can help you out! Of course, you also have your medic grandparents and great-grandparents and cousins and everything, so there's loads of support from the students themselves. You'll also get a faculty tutor, who could be a professor or a researcher or a doctor or who checks up on you in regular turorials and acts as a mediator between you and the uni if you do anything too heinous

    The medics tend to stick together (we have official club nights and everything!) but I've got loads of friends from my halls as well. Most people go into halls for the first year - catered is well worth the expense! The accommodation is mostly on Uni Park, with some people in self-catered in Raleigh Park or Broadgate. Nowhere is more than a 25 minute walk from the QMC, and there's a free hopper bus that connects Jubilee to the main campus and goes around lots of useful places. Transport into town is easy - buses are a flat £1 with your student card, and taxis run about £8 from uni park to the centre.

    Another fun thing medics do well is fundraising - Nottingham is really big on charity work, and Karnival is the biggest university fundraising body outside of the USA. Last year, we raised £1.6 million pounds, of which the medics alone raised an insane £250,000. Karni runs events like balls and the infamous boat party, as well as rag raids (get on a bus, go to a random city somewhere in the UK, collect in fancy dress for the day, have a 'quiet party' on the way home ) and overseas trips - a group of medics have just cycled from London to Paris, some are about to climb Kilimanjaro...

    Nightlife - let's just say that medics know how to party. Basically, there's loads of clubs and pubs if you're into that (Ocean Friday is the official, deliciously cheesy, medic night - just wait and see what happens when the Baywatch theme comes on ). There's several live gigs each week at the Capitol FM arena and Rock City (last year we had everything from Bastille and Mumford and Sons to AWOLNATION and Rihanna). Nights out are generally cheaper than in most big cities, and there's lots of events for if you fance something quieter and/or non-alcoholic.



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    (Original post by g.k.galloway)
    I don't have much yet!!
    7A* 4A at GCSE though (A*s include all sciences, maths and eng Lang, along with art and stuff)
    Just got to see what my UMS scores turn out like for AS really before I can make a final decision


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    What did you get in your Jan modules if you did them?
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    (Original post by AhmedDavid)
    What did you get in your Jan modules if you did them?
    I didn't do any jan modules We do them all in May/June - makes results day even more nerve-wracking
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    Hi! Prospective medic here too! I'm Libby, and I'm a Welsh applicant My profile so far is:
    GCSE: 9.5A* 1A
    January AS: 4A's Biology, Chemistry, Maths and Physics
    Hoping to get 4A's for my overall AS, but I may slip to a B in Biology.
    UKCAT: VA 710, QR 710, AR 840, DA 860, SJ band 1, average 780

    Not sure where to apply yet, but I have a list of potentials:
    Cardiff, Southampton and Leicester because I like them.
    B'ham because of my GCSE grades.
    Nottingham and Northampton because of UKCAT.

    So just introducing myself and looking for advice, is there any benefit at all to keeping all 4 AS to A level? My plan at the moment is if I get a B in Biology AS then to keep all four to A level so I can rely on my 3A offer from the other three, but if I get all A grades at AS I don't know what to do!
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    (Original post by LibbyG)
    Hi! Prospective medic here too! I'm Libby, and I'm a Welsh applicant My profile so far is:
    GCSE: 9.5A* 1A
    January AS: 4A's Biology, Chemistry, Maths and Physics
    Hoping to get 4A's for my overall AS, but I may slip to a B in Biology.
    UKCAT: VA 710, QR 710, AR 840, DA 860, SJ band 1, average 780

    Not sure where to apply yet, but I have a list of potentials:
    Cardiff, Southampton and Leicester because I like them.
    B'ham because of my GCSE grades.
    Nottingham and Northampton because of UKCAT.

    So just introducing myself and looking for advice, is there any benefit at all to keeping all 4 AS to A level? My plan at the moment is if I get a B in Biology AS then to keep all four to A level so I can rely on my 3A offer from the other three, but if I get all A grades at AS I don't know what to do!
    Since when did Northampton have a medical school?? Do you mean Newcastle?

    For the schools you've mentioned there's no benefit to 4 A2's. Bear in mind that getting AAA with 4 subjects will be harder than with three cos you'll have more work throughout the year. Some unis might specify they want Biology in your offer so you'd need an A at A2 in it.
 
 
 
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