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Which graduates are most likely to make 50k+ in their careers? Watch

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    My friends a school leaver and is on a salary of 55,000, he went straight after A-Levels two years ago to work with an IT firm, that's all I really know.
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    (Original post by alevelzzz)
    You can send your child to an independent schools relatively easily on 60k, thats upper middle class.
    What, so now class is purely determined by what school you go to? This is completely new to me. And there I was thinking that class was just as much about who you know and where you came from, oh well, that's me beat. I guess you had better go and edit Wikipedia and write a paper on this theory of yours.
    Going to, or sending you child to, an independent school is neither a necessary nor sufficient condition to be a member of the upper middle class.

    By the logic provided, my GF wouldn't be upper middle class because, despite coming from a family with land holding in both the Uk and West Indies, having a household income well over a quarter of a million, being related to the aristocracy (although somewhat distantly these days) and associating with the aristocracy and upper middle class, her parents didn't feel the need to waste their money on sending her to an independent school.
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    (Original post by alevelzzz)
    Medicine and dentistry are an obvious answer, after that it gets a little blurry and it depends on the university and courses.
    Wondering what you guys think?
    Please dont tell me your thinking of doing a degree based on potential grad earnings? :facepalm:
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    What, so now class is purely determined by what school you go to? This is completely new to me. And there I was thinking that class was just as much about who you know and where you came from, oh well, that's me beat. I guess you had better go and edit Wikipedia and write a paper on this theory of yours.
    Going to, or sending you child to, an independent school is neither a necessary nor sufficient condition to be a member of the upper middle class.
    Of course not, but its very common in upper middle class to go to independent schools. As are certain occupations e.g doctors, dentists, lawyers, engineers etc. As are salary ranges.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_B...s_Survey#Elite

    EDIT: Funny how dentists are in the 'elite' class and pharmacists aren't even in the 'established' middle class lol
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    (Original post by PandaWho)
    Please dont tell me your thinking of doing a degree based on potential grad earnings? :facepalm:
    Its a big factor. Sorry, I care about my quality of life.
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    (Original post by ElChapo)
    This sounds a bit ridiculous, you are saying that investment banks pay a premium to their oxbridge graduates? Also this big company that your physics friend was offered, is it a bank?

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    yes it was a bank, can't remember which one tho
    And in the finance sector the amount you get paid slightly depends on what uni you went to. A lot of my family work there and they tell me that.
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    (Original post by alevelzzz)
    Its a big factor. Sorry, I care about my quality of life.
    You will most likely either hate your degree and time at uni, or really struggle and not do the best you can.

    you should do a degree on the basis you will enjoy what your studying and have a pasion for it!
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    (Original post by alevelzzz)
    60k salary would firmly put you in upper middle class outside of london
    There are no classes
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    (Original post by Ripper-Roo)
    There are no classes
    Whatever you wan't to call those kinds of socio-economic structures, there's no doubting that they exist. The UK is one of the most economically unequal and socially immobile countries in the Western world, and class (or any other label you ascribe) hugely determines life chances due to the access to resources, contacts and role models that a middle or upper-middle class life affords. I say this as someone who is from a working class background (no one in immediate family ever went to university, state education, modest family income, no 'professionals' (e.g. solicitor, architect, highly trained healthcare professional) in the family). I'm sorry, it's sad but it's true.

    To add to what the original poster said, yes £60k outside London does put you squarely in the upper-middle class. In the North-East and Yorkshire a salary in the mid £40k range puts you in the top 10% of earners. It's all relative to where you live, as in London the top 10% of earners take home an average of £80k+.
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    (Original post by Dr.Psych)
    Whatever you wan't to call those kinds of socio-economic structures, there's no doubting that they exist. The UK is one of the most economically unequal and socially immobile countries in the Western world, and class (or any other label you ascribe) hugely determines life chances due to the access to resources, contacts and role models that a middle or upper-middle class life affords. I say this as someone who is from a working class background (no one in immediate family ever went to university, state education, modest family income, no 'professionals' (e.g. solicitor, architect, highly trained healthcare professional) in the family). I'm sorry, it's sad but it's true.

    To add to what the original poster said, yes £60k outside London does put you squarely in the upper-middle class. In the North-East and Yorkshire a salary in the mid £40k range puts you in the top 10% of earners. It's all relative to where you live, as in London the top 10% of earners take home an average of £80k+.
    I know classes do exist in reality, my point is that I don't like how people are separated on the basis of their earnings or lifestyle in principle so they shouldn't

    I think it's only relevant to use classes now to show how different the opportunities are for children of the different classes and parts of the country
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    (Original post by alevelzzz)
    Of course not, but its very common in upper middle class to go to independent schools. As are certain occupations e.g doctors, dentists, lawyers, engineers etc. As are salary ranges.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_B...s_Survey#Elite

    EDIT: Funny how dentists are in the 'elite' class and pharmacists aren't even in the 'established' middle class lol
    Nice to see you switching from the traditional class system to the new system that doesn't even use the word "class". Also, if you read the page, it highlights the flaw that:
    In this new model, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge would be considered middle class despite being second-in-line to the throne, as he is a junior army officer and not a general. This may seem to indicate the model is really a set of subdivisions of the middle classes, rather than an all encompassing model.

    There is a lot more to traditional class than money, in many respects, money only really determines whether or not you're working class.
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    Glad people are saying accountancy at the big 4 firms

    Starting at one in august as a school leaver : - )
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    (Original post by PandaWho)
    Please dont tell me your thinking of doing a degree based on potential grad earnings? :facepalm:
    That's a completely normal thing to consider.
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    That's a completely normal thing to consider.

    for me money has never come into it, if it has why would i be doing a degree where the governments CUTTING jobs and services?

    ooooh lets see, maybe because im passionate about it and want to help people!
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    (Original post by Ripper-Roo)
    I know classes do exist in reality, my point is that I don't like how people are separated on the basis of their earnings or lifestyle in principle so they shouldn't

    I think it's only relevant to use classes now to show how different the opportunities are for children of the different classes and parts of the country
    I don't like the terms either to be honest; they're too vague and therefore open to unintentional or intentional alteration depending on a person's agenda or viewpoint. The perfect example of this is a recent article by The Telegraph which referred to a person earning £120k a year as 'middle class'. Anyone with a hint of brain matter would know that that's rubbish, as the median full-time income in this country is roughly £26.5k, with regional variations placing that figure at around £20k for many areas of the country (basically, anywhere above Watford). T

    To me, the recent class class calculator from the BBC was on the money. It combined social, cultural and financial capital to determine one's class, which is a good reflection of how one can differentiate classes and the means by which the class system influences life chances (i.e. not just due to financial capital, but also through access to social capital). If your parents know a chief exec, and you want to get into business, or they know a Consultant Psychologist in private practice and you want to be a Psychologist, you've got a better chance of getting helpful experience via those contacts than if your parents didn't have them.

    On a personal note, for me class is a mixture of cultural, social, political and economic capital. One's classification according to the latter is in my opinion dependent on regional variation; an individual can be middle class in the North East on a salary of £35-40k a year, but might not be considered middle class in a financial sense if they earned that in London.
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    (Original post by PandaWho)
    for me money has never come into it, if it has why would i be doing a degree where the governments CUTTING jobs and services?

    ooooh lets see, maybe because im passionate about it and want to help people!
    But he's right, it's a perfectly normal thing to do. Some people truly are that passionate, but many if given the choice between, say, being a Doctor (which they want to do because they like that sort of thing and want to help people) for the living wage and, say, going into finance, which they also like but not quite as much, for 50k I expect a huge number would go for the latter.
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    Hopefully it won't take me long to achieve that salary after my computer science degree. Although I'd happily earn a lot less for the right job!
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    (Original post by Dr.Psych)
    I don't like the terms either to be honest; they're too vague and therefore open to unintentional or intentional alteration depending on a person's agenda or viewpoint. The perfect example of this is a recent article by The Telegraph which referred to a person earning £120k a year as 'middle class'. Anyone with a hint of brain matter would know that that's rubbish, as the median full-time income in this country is roughly £26.5k, with regional variations placing that figure at around £20k for many areas of the country (basically, anywhere above Watford). T

    To me, the recent class class calculator from the BBC was on the money. It combined social, cultural and financial capital to determine one's class, which is a good reflection of how one can differentiate classes and the means by which the class system influences life chances (i.e. not just due to financial capital, but also through access to social capital). If your parents know a chief exec, and you want to get into business, or they know a Consultant Psychologist in private practice and you want to be a Psychologist, you've got a better chance of getting helpful experience via those contacts than if your parents didn't have them.

    On a personal note, for me class is a mixture of cultural, social, political and economic capital. One's classification according to the latter is in my opinion dependent on regional variation; an individual can be middle class in the North East on a salary of £35-40k a year, but might not be considered middle class in a financial sense if they earned that in London.
    But, as already stated, class is more than income, this is what Wikipedia has to say on the Upper class (among other things, of course):
    The British "upper class" is statistically very small and consists of the peerage, gentry, and hereditary landowners.

    The person on 120k is not likely to fulfill enough of the criteria, per se, to be considered part of the Upper class, but they are clearly not working class, therefore they must be middle class. Middle class spans a large range of situations, hence why it's broken into lower-middle, middle-middle and upper-middle.
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    Should I take an economics or maths degree? If I don't get into the City, would a maths degree leave me with better chances of becoming an actuary? If I worked hard, could I be earning over £80k as an actuary too, after about 10-15 years (i.e when I'm 33)? I'm confused... I know no personal contacts, and I am not exactly high or even middle-middle class. I'm lower-middle. Nonetheless, I go to a school with extremely rich and well-connected people, on a bursary. One or two could help me get into the City in the future, and one EXTREMELY rich guy I know directly told me "[my] dad knows a few people at the banks, so you know I could help you". His dad's an entrepreneur with a net worth of over £10mil... My life's hilarious. Everyone I know is so beyond me. I can only hope all this translates to upward social mobility for me (i.e. going from technical middle class to the elite class).
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    But he's right, it's a perfectly normal thing to do. Some people truly are that passionate, but many if given the choice between, say, being a Doctor (which they want to do because they like that sort of thing and want to help people) for the living wage and, say, going into finance, which they also like but not quite as much, for 50k I expect a huge number would go for the latter.
    i dont know many people wwho have gone to uni purely for the money when they graduate.

    even my brother, who could have done so many academic subjects at uni, and as some say hed be "upper middle class" because of his school life when hes not, but no he chose to study sociology and criminology because he wants to work in rehab to HELP people.
 
 
 
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