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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    Be glad you didn't. You really need one if you want to do really well and also keep your options open. It's a case of everyone has one, so you need one too. 30 years ago you were fine to do that, in the Big Bang you could get in and make a lot of money that way. I went in through that same traditional route but there's just less money and stability to be had today.
    You have quite an unusual situation. How are you planning to adapt to this kind of change?
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    (Original post by glebp)
    You have quite an unusual situation. How are you planning to adapt to this kind of change?
    Getting my degree, finally, and having a focus on tech. May or may not go back into it though. It's not an unusual situation, everything is changing for everyone with technological advancements and MiFiD and SEF.
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    (Original post by BarryBeTrippin)
    Wrong. "Arbitrage". Hint: Insider trading (which is not completely illegal). That's one example. Another hint: Market manipulation (e.g. spoofing).

    So many pseudos on this thread I could cook a tonne of meth.
    Your last sentence doesn't make sense, and how am I wrong? You cannot completely eliminate risk, just because you can exploit something doesn't mean there's no risk, and it certainly wouldn't last forever.
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    (Original post by djibbo)
    Your last sentence doesn't make sense, and how am I wrong? You cannot completely eliminate risk, just because you can exploit something doesn't mean there's no risk, and it certainly wouldn't last forever.
    Pseudo = Pseudoephedrine, which is involved in the production of meth.

    Operational risk. But not what I was talking about.
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    (Original post by BarryBeTrippin)
    Pseudo = Pseudoephedrine, which is involved in the production of meth.

    Operational risk. But not what I was talking about.
    I know what pseudo means, it just has no relevance to your comment. And if it's not what you were talking about then why bring something else up?
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    (Original post by djibbo)
    I know what pseudo means, it just has no relevance to your comment. And if it's not what you were talking about then why bring something else up?
    "So many pseudos on this thread I could cook meth" = This thread is full of pseudo-intellectuals
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    (Original post by BarryBeTrippin)
    "So many pseudos on this thread I could cook meth" = This thread is full of pseudo-intellectuals
    pseudo actually is short for pseudonym.
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    (Original post by Daniel9998)
    Jesus, this is a perfect example of what one troll can do to a TSR thread.
    Who's the troll?



















    j/k
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    (Original post by debs20153)
    oh my god guys its tai lopez. KNOWLEDGE
    Attachment 511691
    7 Lamborghinis in my Lamborghini account.
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    There are so many things to write here that I just haven't got around to it.

    This is a fact - you can make billions if you aim for it. When they told us in school we can have anything there is in the world as long as we aim for it they weren't lying.
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    (Original post by King Scorchy)
    There are so many things to write here that I just haven't got around to it.

    This is a fact - you can make billions if you aim for it. When they told us in school we can have anything there is in the world as long as we aim for it they weren't lying.
    Except they were (if not lying, then just plain telling untruths), because you can't have my love and affection, even if you aim for it. Hence, false.
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    (Original post by King Scorchy)
    There are so many things to write here that I just haven't got around to it.

    This is a fact - you can make billions if you aim for it. When they told us in school we can have anything there is in the world as long as we aim for it they weren't lying.
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    You can make a few millions, although that is increasingly difficult post recession. The golden bonus years are gone and not coming back. Buy-side is the real deal! I don't, for the life of me, know why there are so many suckers obsessively trying to get into IB when in fact its the *****iest life one could have. Not many people actually like working here and they use this experience as stepping stone to a career in the buy side. Why waste your youth in IB when you can go directly to fund management etc.. I mean, how is doing grunt work which resembles more an admin job than finance job appealing? There are exceptions - sell side research etc where you actually have to think etc. But still. IB IS SO OVERRATED.


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    (Original post by souman)
    You can make a few millions, although that is increasingly difficult post recession. The golden bonus years are gone and not coming back. Buy-side is the real deal! I don't, for the life of me, know why there are so many suckers obsessively trying to get into IB when in fact its the *****iest life one could have. Not many people actually like working here and they use this experience as stepping stone to a career in the buy side. Why waste your youth in IB when you can go directly to fund management etc.. I mean, how is doing grunt work which resembles more an admin job than finance job appealing? There are exceptions - sell side research etc where you actually have to think etc. But still. IB IS SO OVERRATED.


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    Try getting into a megafund PE shop without IB/consulting experience. Or even an MM without the aforementioned + maybe big4 corpfin.

    Apart from the odd AM shop, most buy side houses require experience. You simply can't beat the optionality an entry level job in IB/consulting affords you, could be doing anything from internal strat, to PE, to HF to AM to internal M&A after.

    FO MDs are still making millions and people do stick around because they enjoy what they do.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Try getting into a megafund PE shop without IB/consulting experience. Or even an MM without the aforementioned + maybe big4 corpfin.

    Apart from the odd AM shop, most buy side houses require experience. You simply can't beat the optionality an entry level job in IB/consulting affords you, could be doing anything from internal strat, to PE, to HF to AM to internal M&A after.

    FO MDs are still making millions and people do stick around because they enjoy what they do.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I had a discussion with one of the experienced fund managers at an AM where i did a summer internship. He said that he would rather have someone who has been working in buy side because he would have truly relevant experience. IB candidates could be very strong but the whole 'traditional path' (i.e. Working few years in IB and then moving) has been shaped by the fact that buy side was smaller and did not have graduate/entry level positions that much. This is changing now. Even hedge funds are starting to recruit straight from university. The problem is that people are not recognising this shift in trend and are following blindly the 'traditional path'. If you love IB and have done your research, by all means go for it. But don't tell me IB is the only way into lucrative buy-side positions. In 5 to 10 years graduate recruitment will be common in even the most specialised fields and IB candidate will lose out.


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    (Original post by souman)
    I had a discussion with one of the experienced fund managers at an AM where i did a summer internship. He said that he would rather have someone who has been working in buy side because he would have truly relevant experience. IB candidates could be very strong but the whole 'traditional path' (i.e. Working few years in IB and then moving) has been shaped by the fact that buy side was smaller and did not have graduate/entry level positions that much. This is changing now. Even hedge funds are starting to recruit straight from university. The problem is that people are not recognising this shift in trend and are following blindly the 'traditional path'. If you love IB and have done your research, by all means go for it. But don't tell me IB is the only way into lucrative buy-side positions. In 5 to 10 years graduate recruitment will be common in even the most specialised fields and IB candidate will lose out.


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    I personally wouldn't go long on that, in fact I'd short your hypothesis. Guess the only way to see how it'll play out is to wait.

    Of course some firms have started hiring more grads, but by and large the vast majority of new intakes into buyside shops aren't undergrads. Even the AM houses that do hire out of undergrad only take on low single digits to low tens. The PE/HF space will stick with the same recruitment pipeline for the foreseeable future.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    I personally wouldn't go long on that, in fact I'd short your hypothesis. Guess the only way to see how it'll play out is to wait.

    Of course some firms have started hiring more grads, but by and large the vast majority of new intakes into buyside shops aren't undergrads. Even the AM houses that do hire out of undergrad only take on low single digits to low tens. The PE/HF space will stick with the same recruitment pipeline for the foreseeable future.

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    Would i be better off leaving my money with the asset management company, or having some more direct input in to it's outcomes, now that i have been taken out of the court of protection (last year) and close to graduation (this year)??
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    (Original post by john2054)
    Would i be better off leaving my money with the asset management company, or having some more direct input in to it's outcomes, now that i have been taken out of the court of protection (last year) and close to graduation (this year)??
    Honestly, it depends on you. If you have faith in the AM firm, and they've been positing good returns you might be better off leaving the cash there. I always try to diversify tho (at least with my cash), so maybe withdraw some and place a bit in a few index tracking ETFs, or in property etc.

    Really though, you should speak to a financial advisor. They'll be better placed to help you out.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Honestly, it depends on you. If you have faith in the AM firm, and they've been positing good returns you might be better off leaving the cash there. I always try to diversify tho (at least with my cash), so maybe withdraw some and place a bit in a few index tracking ETFs, or in property etc.

    Really though, you should speak to a financial advisor. They'll be better placed to help you out.
    Yes thanks, i understand the importance of not moving too hastily. But that being said, this same investment manager recommended that i remain in the court of protection, when i was losing £35 k up, a year, shearly for the pleasure of doing so. Now that my money is out, i can literally spend it as i wish.

    However given that a fund which was once touching on half a million, has now depreciated to about £150k, i'm afraid that there is not much room left for manouvre. And it would appear that the markets are in quite a bad state right now, meaning that i am losing money, quarter on in.

    We were thinking about buying a property, but then i saw sense, given that keeping my money liquid, seems to be in my best interest right now. I have subscribed to a fund manager magazine, but their information seems to be heavily weighted towards their own products.

    In theory i could buy outright, and then be put in a losing position if we need to follow the schools when my daughter completes primary school in a few years, and again, when i graduate, and maybe we need to relocate to get myself a better job.

    How much are reasonable three bedroom houses going for these days, near to schools, and universities, anyway??
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    (Original post by john2054)
    Yes thanks, i understand the importance of not moving too hastily. But that being said, this same investment manager recommended that i remain in the court of protection, when i was losing £35 k up, a year, shearly for the pleasure of doing so. Now that my money is out, i can literally spend it as i wish.

    However given that a fund which was once touching on half a million, has now depreciated to about £150k, i'm afraid that there is not much room left for manouvre. And it would appear that the markets are in quite a bad state right now, meaning that i am losing money, quarter on in.

    We were thinking about buying a property, but then i saw sense, given that keeping my money liquid, seems to be in my best interest right now. I have subscribed to a fund manager magazine, but their information seems to be heavily weighted towards their own products.

    In theory i could buy outright, and then be put in a losing position if we need to follow the schools when my daughter completes primary school in a few years, and again, when i graduate, and maybe we need to relocate to get myself a better job.

    How much are reasonable three bedroom houses going for these days, near to schools, and universities, anyway??
    Depends entirely on location, my sister bought a two bedroom apartment for £250k in London zone 6 and in 4 months it's up 25k, and its rented out so additional 1.1k a month
 
 
 
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