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AQA A2 MFP3 Further Pure 3 – 18th May 2016 [Exam Discussion Thread] Watch

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    anyone avaliable to help/showquickly what they did for 8aii on Jan 13 please??
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    (Original post by IrrationalRoot)
    Certainly 14/15 if you haven't done them but otherwise Jan 13 looks nice. Older ones maybe Jan 07? Plus June 09, Jan 10 (lol I don't expect you to try all of these btw) since there's a cheeky 11 marker thrown in there .
    Dont forget those 2004 2005 polar qs
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    (Original post by Emi1998)
    anyone avaliable to help/showquickly what they did for 8aii on Jan 13 please??
    EZ finding are between pi/2 and pi/3
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    (Original post by Emi1998)
    anyone avaliable to help/showquickly what they did for 8aii on Jan 13 please??
    If you get the integral into the from
     \displaystyle \int \left (1-\cos 4\theta +2\sin^2 \theta \cos^3 \theta \right ) d\theta , you can make the sub  u=\sin \theta or you can split the RHS of the integral (integrate the 1+cos 4 theta on the LHS on it's own) to make it look like this  \sin^2 \theta \cos^2 \theta \cos \theta = \sin^2 \thtea (1-\sin^2 \theta )\cos \theta =\sin^2 \theta \cos \theta -\sin^4 \theta \cos \theta .
    Using the result from the earlier part of the question now.
    I think people who have knowledge of reduction formula's have an advantage as you split the integral up in a similar way as you would when finding a reduction formula.
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    On 8bii) of June 2015, I don't understand why you ignore the other two roots of the equation? I don't understand the mark-schemes reasoning.
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    (Original post by 2014_GCSE)
    On 8bii) of June 2015, I don't understand why you ignore the other two roots of the equation?
    Am I looking at the right paper? There doesn't seem to be a Q8, perchance is it a question about length in which case you ignore the negative roots because a length is a positive quantity?
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    May the odds be ever in your favor
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Am I looking at the right paper? There doesn't seem to be a Q8, perchance is it a question about length in which case you ignore the negative roots because a length is a positive quantity?
    Sorry I meant 7 b ii) and ah yes, that makes sense for Rb, but why do they ignore R = 1.5?

    Wait, never mind, I get it!!
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    (Original post by 2014_GCSE)
    Sorry I meant 7 b ii) and ah yes, that makes sense for Rb, but why do they ignore R = 1.5?

    Wait, never mind, I get it!!
    Awesome.
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    Good sleep = OP
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    :goodluck: Hope you all achieve what you need and more! :goodluck:
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    In my maths book it says there can be an exceptional case in the paper where if you had no "y"s in the differential equation, then you increase the power on the particular integral and then keep going down.
    What I mean by this is if you had say:

    f''(x) + f'(x) = 2, instead of f''(x) + f'(x) + y = 2

    The P.I would be "y = ax + b" instead of "y = a".

    Can anyone shed any light on this? Not seen this in any past papers...
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    (Original post by 2014_GCSE)
    In my maths book it says there can be an exceptional case in the paper where if you had no "y"s in the differential equation, then you increase the power on the particular integral and then keep going down.
    What I mean by this is if you had say:

    f''(x) + f'(x) = 2, instead of f''(x) + f'(x) + y = 2

    The P.I would be "y = ax + b" instead of "y = a".

    Can anyone shed any light on this? Not seen this in any past papers...
    I always use an order 1 above that of your expected PI if it's a non standard D.E.
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    Having only 3 hours sleep makes me a bit anxious for an hour and a half of differential equations/polars...
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    (Original post by Argylesocksrox)
    I always use an order 1 above that of your expected PI if it's a non standard D.E.
    Okay, thanks! Could you state what kind of thing would exactly be regarded as a "non standard D.E"?

    (Original post by Argylesocksrox)
    Having only 3 hours sleep makes me a bit anxious for an hour and a half of differential equations/polars...

    Yep, I know how you feel. I only got 4 and half so slightly better but still not great.
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    (Original post by 2014_GCSE)
    Okay, thanks! Could you state what kind of thing would exactly be regarded as a "non standard D.E"?




    Yep, I know how you feel. I only got 4 and half so slightly better but still not great.
    Well, in specific cases there's y''=f(x) in which you can simply integrate both sides twice, then there's y''+y'=f(x) in which a substitution works, ie p=dy/dx hence dp/dx=d^2y/dx^2 etc,

    then y''+y=f(x) which is pretty easy, these are the only real non standard D.E's.
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    Good morning
    I think these exeptional cases wont aappear
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    Now we just have to wait for josh to post the mark scheme
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    Well that was difficult lol
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    That was horrible
 
 
 
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