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Edexcel Government & Politics - Unit 2 Governing the UK (09/06/16)

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    (Original post by Louise12307)
    Okay thanks.

    So to clarify an example would be:

    A strength of the U.K. Constitution is that it is flexible. The lack of codification means that the constitution can be altered quickly (as soon as two days). For example, this was highlighted when the Dunblane school massacre occurred as laws were able to be passed shortly after in order to restrict ability to access handguns. This shows that, during a crisis, the government is able to act quickly and efficiently to pass legislation in the national interest. This contrasts with the US that has a codified consititution and, despite President Obama's pledge to pressure Congress for changes to the Second Amendment after the Sandy Hook school shooting, nothing has yet been done due to tough constitutional amendment processes.
    However, the fact that the UK can amend it's consititution in such a short amount of time and with just a single Act of Parliament can be cause for concern because the government could be said to hold too much power. Indeed, Lord Hailsham dubbed newly elected governments as "elective dictatorships" due to the lack of checks on their power.

    Is this just 1 para? Or do I split the strength and weakness into 2? And if it's just 1 then do I do this 6 times?
    I mentioned sandy hook in my class essay
    Really good up to date one to use
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    Analyse the main factors that limit the effectiveness of Parliament?

    would this be 25 or 40? anyone got a rough plan with main points?
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    What's the difference between Convention and Common Law concerning sources of the UK's constitution?
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    (Original post by kirsche)
    Analyse the main factors that limit the effectiveness of Parliament?

    would this be 25 or 40? anyone got a rough plan with main points?
    Could be both tbh. My points would be -

    > The size of the government's majority.
    > The strength of the House of Lords.
    > The presence of a coalition.
    > The unity of the government/cabinet.
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    (Original post by UKStudent17)
    I mean, judging by yesterday's exam, the message is that anything can come up. Given that this year in relation to sovereignty and the constitution has been significantly more important than previous years, they very well might put a question like that in again, I imagine.
    Yeah I deffo agree, I'm gonna go over it more when I get back from my double lesson


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    Do you guys have any tips on how to actually learn this? I've been sat here for hours with no idea how or where to begin..
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    (Original post by thesporkthief)
    Do you guys have any tips on how to actually learn this? I've been sat here for hours with no idea how or where to begin..
    I'm going through each topic in the revision guides making shortened notes through spider diagrams. I also, use mnemonics to remember things such as what makes up the UK constitution.
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    (Original post by thesporkthief)
    Do you guys have any tips on how to actually learn this? I've been sat here for hours with no idea how or where to begin..
    Basically I'm just going over the predicted exam questions and other key information like functions, features, etc.

    I'm only focusing on 3 topics (PM & Cabinet, Constitution and Parliament) because of the limited time and because I find judiciary both difficult and pretty boring, so I doubt I'd be able to understand it much.

    There are some brilliant resources/guides/checklists scattered across the pages in this thread if you'd like to get some extra help.

    Trust me, I know what it's like to feel lost in this Unit. I've only just grasped an idea of what to do this morning!
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    (Original post by jxssamy)
    What's the difference between Convention and Common Law concerning sources of the UK's constitution?
    Conventions are unwritten traditions that become effectively (not actually) entrenched over time. They have no legal standing but have become politically accepted. Example: Royal Prerogative powers carried out by PM instead of the monarchy.

    Common Law are interpretations of the constitution made by senior judges that become effectively binding on lower courts and will be the natural way to deal with that certain case in the future. Examples are judicial reviews like the Belmarsh Case.


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    (Original post by thesporkthief)
    Do you guys have any tips on how to actually learn this? I've been sat here for hours with no idea how or where to begin..
    You could always download the app 'gojimo' it quizzes you and politics is on it I sometimes use it if I don't feel like writing I just do the quizzes


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    (Original post by Louise12307)
    Conventions are unwritten traditions that become effectively (not actually) entrenched over time. They have no legal standing but have become politically accepted. Example: Royal Prerogative powers carried out by PM instead of the monarchy.

    Common Law are interpretations of the constitution made by senior judges that become effectively binding on lower courts and will be the natural way to deal with that certain case in the future. Examples are judicial reviews like the Belmarsh Case.


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    Thank you so much!!
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    Can someone explain the principles of the constitution?
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    I reckon the 40 marker on Constitution will be a strengths/limitations essay.

    Has anyone got any predictions what the 25 marker on Parliament will be?
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    do you think i can revise Parliament in one day?
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    (Original post by xxvine)
    Can someone explain the principles of the constitution?
    You mean the UK one ?

    > unitary government - legal sovereignty located at the centre which is parliament
    (Although could be debated whether we are now a quasi-federalist state)
    > it is uncodified - variety of sources and much is unwritten such as conventions
    > it is not entrenched due to parliamentary sovereignty
    > constitutional monarchy and Royal Prerogative powers largely carried out by PM due to the Glorious Revolution of 1688 where William of Orange was invited to take the throne under the condition of signing the Bill of Rights which essentially transfers legal sovereignty to parliament. PM can be argued to be a "quasi head of state"
    > parliamentary government - separation of powers (gov drawn from parliament and accountable to parliament)
    > parliamentary sovereignty - parliament is the ultimate source of authority within the political system
    > party government - the British constitutional system can only operate in the context of party control


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    (Original post by xxvine)
    Can someone explain the principles of the constitution?
    Parliamentary sovereignty - Parliament should be the most sovereign body in the UK, considering it is the source of statute law (the most authoritative type of law in the constitution). Can be questioned with the emergence of the EU and its overriding laws.

    Parliamentary government - The UK should have a parliamentary government; this is where the executive is sourced from the legislative, and they often overlap and interact (e.g. cabinet ministers come from parliament; the PM controls the government's party etc.)

    Rule of law - The government is not exempt from the law it creates; the law can still be applied to the government.

    EU - The UK is a member of the EU. It sources many different laws from it. Questions parliamentary sovereignty.

    Constitutional monarchy - The UK should be officially headed by a monarch. This is not an absolute monarchy, however, as many powers have been handed over to parliament and the PM (e.g. the Royal Prerogative)
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    (Original post by dmy15)
    do you think i can revise Parliament in one day?
    Yeah that's what I'm doing
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    You know how they always ask about 'constitutional reforms since 1997', do you think that they would ever ask about 'proposed/reforms since 2010' from the coalition?
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    (Original post by kirsche)
    You know how they always ask about 'constitutional reforms since 1997', do you think that they would ever ask about 'proposed/reforms since 2010' from the coalition?
    They might, but I'm not sure if there's really enough to talk about so it would probably be a 25 marker tops if it was going to be an essay question. Also, the coalition isn't really too relevant anymore so we are probably more likely to get a question on sovereignty in relation to the EU or something


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    (Original post by Louise12307)
    They might, but I'm not sure if there's really enough to talk about so it would probably be a 25 marker tops if it was going to be an essay question. Also, the coalition isn't really too relevant anymore so we are probably more likely to get a question on sovereignty in relation to the EU or something


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    as said earlier, the chances of it being sovereignty are incredibly slim

    - sovereignty was the question for constitution last year
    - democracy question was related to sovereignty - EU, quasi-federalism

    constitutional reforms came up 2 years ago so probably not that either
 
 
 
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