What's the essential piece of advice you'd give to someone starting their A-levels?

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    Start months and months before exam leave and start doing the past papers. Today (day before results) I can relax a bit because I did as many papers in each subject as I could fit in (after doing revision on the topics), and knowing my grades in them reassures me that I'm going to get the grades needed today. Exam boards only have so many variants of questions that they can set, and if you've seen them all before your at least 50% of the way towards answering them.
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    Start months and months before exam leave and start doing the past papers. Today (day before results) I can relax a bit because I did as many papers in each subject as I could fit in (after doing revision on the topics), and knowing my grades in them reassures me that I'm going to get the grades needed today. Exam boards only have so many variants of questions that they can set, and if you've seen them all before your at least 50% of the way towards answering them.
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    -Start making your revision notes form the beginning
    -Know the friends that will distract you and the ones you can actually get work done with
    -If you take an A level and you don't like it CHANGE IT as quickly as possible. You'll thank yourself later.
    -At least consider having 1 hard A level but if not do an EPQ which employers also value now
    -Ignore teachers that think you not capable especially if you believe in your own potential. My teachers predicted me a D and i came out with an A so i know what i'm on about.
    -If you want to go to a top uni, APPLY TO IT, don't listen to teachers who tell you you can't make it or your not good enough.
    -SLEEP
    -If you do badly at the beginning its okay, you can only go higher from there.
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    -Start making your revision notes form the beginning
    -Know the friends that will distract you and the ones you can actually get work done with
    -If you take an A level and you don't like it CHANGE IT as quickly as possible. You'll thank yourself later.
    -At least consider having 1 hard A level but if not do an EPQ which employers also value now
    -Ignore teachers that think you not capable especially if you believe in your own potential. My teachers predicted me a D and i came out with an A so i know what i'm on about.
    -If you want to go to a top uni, APPLY TO IT, don't listen to teachers who tell you you can't make it or your not good enough.
    -SLEEP
    -If you do badly at the beginning its okay, you can only go higher from there.
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    (Original post by z33)
    There were people who got A*s at GCSE who end up failing AS and retaking or doing BTECs. And then there were people who barely scraped Cs who got Bs and As at AS so its not about how 'naturally intelligent' you are - work hard, play hard. Simple. So if you dont enjoy your subjects/ arent committed to them... you will fail fam.
    This. I know kids who got A*s at GCSE who really struggled with AS levels, and a kid with 5 GCSEs who's predicted to get 4 As. Some subjects can be completely different from their GCSE counterparts (eg: AS History) so it's important not to get arrogant or assume that you'll inevitably ace the exams on the basis of GCSE performance. But people who work very, very hard and revise consistently, enjoy and "get" their subject, read widely around the subject and do well in lots of past papers have a good chance, I think...
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    (Original post by z33)
    There were people who got A*s at GCSE who end up failing AS and retaking or doing BTECs. And then there were people who barely scraped Cs who got Bs and As at AS so its not about how 'naturally intelligent' you are - work hard, play hard. Simple. So if you dont enjoy your subjects/ arent committed to them... you will fail fam.
    This. I know kids who got A*s at GCSE who really struggled with AS levels, and a kid with 5 GCSEs who's predicted to get 4 As. Some subjects can be completely different from their GCSE counterparts (eg: AS History) so it's important not to get arrogant or assume that you'll inevitably ace the exams on the basis of GCSE performance. But people who work very, very hard and revise consistently, enjoy and "get" their subject, read widely around the subject and do well in lots of past papers have a good chance, I think...
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    CGP revision guides are crap when you reach A2. Don't use them - there are loads of ace revision guides on the internet (eg. for OCR Advancing Physics B)

    For maths and physics and chemistry, the best way to revise is past papers. Do as many as you can. The same exact questions might not come up again, but the same format will, and you'll learn exam technique as well as making sure you cover everything on the syllabus.

    TLDR; do past papers
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    The biggest thing is keeping up, making sure you keep your homeworks and notes organised, so you know where to look when you need something later.
    Don't be afraid to go and talk to your teachers if there's something you're not completely happy about, it's their job to make sure that you understand everything. A lot of subjects at my college had lunchtime support sessions where you can just go and work, and ask straight away if you need help.
    YouTube is your friend. For me, especially with maths and physics there are tonnes of lessons which can go over explaining something you have already in class, maybe just in a slightly different way to your teacher which might just make something click for you.
    I found these really useful for maths:
    HegartyMaths - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLJ...UYO2tOEcXe1mHA
    Achieve Maths - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCg4...6voZfG75oFso6w

    But the most important thing is not to worry (too much) if you can avoid it and just do your best.
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    Start revising yesterday
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    (Original post by She-Ra)
    Your A-levels are done, you're now officially a little bit older and a little bit wiser :moon:

    So what's the essential piece of advice you'd give to someone starting their A-levels?

    This is a golden thread. Join in with the discussion before 26 August 2016 to be in with the chance of winning an iPad air 2!

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    3. Which GCSE subject can you not wish to ditch?

    4. Sum up how you’re feeling about results day in a meme or gif

    5. How do you plan to celebrate your exam results?

    6. Starting uni: what are you most excited about?

    7. One essential piece of advice you'd give to someone starting their A-levels

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    The competition runs from 3 August to 23:59 on 26 August 2016. The random draw will be made on 30 August 2016.
    Please work hard. It will benefit you, even if you don't feel like it, try and work hard. Make sure you understand everything at least two months before the exam, especially if you're taking an AS that will count towards A2. If you're a person who is good at the 'traditional academic' subjects, don't do a humanities and vice versa. I did maths, physics, history and chemistry at AS. I struggled a lot in chemistry and failed the baseline test twice but carried on. Then, in Feburary, I dropped chem. Big mistake as I kept getting D's and E's in history class tests and had to sit the AS which I know I've flopped. In chemistry I was getting E's, but chemistry, I know now was more in my scale as I suck at writing essays and the coursework section is going to kill me and what made me decide to not do an EPQ. With chemistry, I could've learned it but history is all about remembering, not applying knowledge.

    Think carefully about what you choose to study, it should be a balance between what you enjoy and what you're good at. Make friends who will encourage you, not put you down. Make friends in your classes but also with people who do a different subject than you.

    Good luck!
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    Two pieces of advice:

    1. Don't be afraid of switching subjects. Everyone in my friendship group bar two switched or dropped subjects in Year 12. If something really doesn't interest you, or you're finding it surprisingly difficult, do something about it because it won't get any easier the longer you leave it. Don't worry that your teachers or family will judge you, and don't avoid doing it because you don't have a friend studying that subject, you have to do what's best for you at the end of the day.

    2. Study continuously! This is probably the most commonly given advice and we all know how important it is and how difficult it can be. I found that the best way to do this was to pretend that after every topic there would be an exam, and to treat your mocks like they are the real thing. It can be hard, but it will pay off in the end.
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    Go over the material constantly abc you'll be fine

    Past papers are gold*
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    Whatever you do, do your work first. No matter how much you'll want to socialise, I suggest finishing your work first before anything else because that's what is going to prepare you for your exams.
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    A good nights sleep is 100 times better than cramming for any exam.
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    (Original post by connieiscrazy)
    Whatever you do, don't waste your free periods. That time is dead valuable
    what would you suggest is the best way to use this time?e.g. notes, past papers etc
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    (Original post by connieiscrazy)
    Whatever you do, don't waste your free periods. That time is dead valuable
    what would you suggest is the best way to use this time?e.g. notes, past papers etc
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    thankyou to everyone on this thread i think i speak on behalf of all a-level starters when i say that you have honestly given us a good head start
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    (Original post by OHH_MY_DAYZ:b)
    what would you suggest is the best way to use this time?e.g. notes, past papers etc
    I would keep up to date on homework and notes to be honest.
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    If you're not committed to doing the A Level courses, then don't do it. If your parents are forcing you to go and you're not ready speak to them. But if you're ready commit yourself to what's coming
 
 
 
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Updated: September 19, 2016
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