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    Yep there is an element of dread but I think once I get past my tutor coming in for the last time to observe me I will be fine. So close to the end now, we will be celebrating soon!
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    I think what's making me dread it is the fact that when we broke up I had a reallyy bad week in terms of behaviour. And one class's assessments were rubbish so I have to redo them (for the second time as they STILL aren't getting it) with them when I go back. The teacher of that class is my old mentor who I get very anxious and nervous around and she makes me feel like I can't do anything (probably me just thinking this though because of how my first placement at the school went when she was my mentor).
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    (Original post by Shelly_x)
    I think what's making me dread it is the fact that when we broke up I had a reallyy bad week in terms of behaviour. And one class's assessments were rubbish so I have to redo them (for the second time as they STILL aren't getting it) with them when I go back. The teacher of that class is my old mentor who I get very anxious and nervous around and she makes me feel like I can't do anything (probably me just thinking this though because of how my first placement at the school went when she was my mentor).
    I'm always told my behaviour management needs to improve - too much chit chat. I just think it's inherent in that class - my mentor is as bad as me with them at times. Still, I've decided to go in there next week all guns blazing in that respect; not gonna tolerate nonsense from them especially when I'm teaching them. But it's hard because they're only 4-5 years old. How hard can you I really be??

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    A quick question for all of you who have secured your NQT position...have you negotiated your salary at all (or attempted to negotiate) or do you automatically go in at the M1 level?
    Just wondering whether negotiating (or at least asking the question) is the done thing in teaching? My instinct tells me that it's not!

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by bellylaugh)
    A quick question for all of you who have secured your NQT position...have you negotiated your salary at all (or attempted to negotiate) or do you automatically go in at the M1 level?
    Just wondering whether negotiating (or at least asking the question) is the done thing in teaching? My instinct tells me that it's not!

    Thanks!
    I haven't, I'm just assuming I'm being placed on the bottom. However, now that performance pay has been put in it has opened the way for salary to be negotiated. I know one NQT that has been offered a start on M2, but she didn't ask for it they just gave her it.
    I'm not sure whether its the done thing for NQTs, but experienced teachers certainly can.
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    (Original post by Shelly_x)
    I haven't, I'm just assuming I'm being placed on the bottom. However, now that performance pay has been put in it has opened the way for salary to be negotiated. I know one NQT that has been offered a start on M2, but she didn't ask for it they just gave her it.
    I'm not sure whether its the done thing for NQTs, but experienced teachers certainly can.
    Thanks Shelly!
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    (Original post by bellylaugh)
    A quick question for all of you who have secured your NQT position...have you negotiated your salary at all (or attempted to negotiate) or do you automatically go in at the M1 level?
    Just wondering whether negotiating (or at least asking the question) is the done thing in teaching? My instinct tells me that it's not!

    Thanks!
    You can negotiate, I have been told that it is becoming more acceptable, you explain to them what additional qualities, experience etc you can bring.



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    (Original post by qwerty_mad)
    I'm always told my behaviour management needs to improve - too much chit chat. I just think it's inherent in that class - my mentor is as bad as me with them at times. Still, I've decided to go in there next week all guns blazing in that respect; not gonna tolerate nonsense from them especially when I'm teaching them. But it's hard because they're only 4-5 years old. How hard can you I really be??

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    Some classes are unusually chatty! It's bit so much about being hard but being consistent and clear about your expectations. Try getting some "sitting on the carpet prompts" from twinkl or similar and every time you sit down refer to them. I edited the lips closed one and added "while someone else is talking", since I want to encourage a culture of open discussion about the book/topic we are looking at (that's the bit I find hardest! How to encourage that without undermining things). First, try to praise a good role model, mauve even with stickers. Then, when you call one of them up on it remind them why (then we can't hear and you can't hear, it will stop us learning etc). Next give a clear consequence (please make a good choice by showing me good sitting, otherwise you will have to move away from x). Refer back to the prompts all the time (mine are stuck up the side of the board). Stickers or a star chat/smiley chart whatever can work really well and you can fade out as they get better. I also find amateur dramatics can work wonders... Closing the book and pulling a fed up face "oh no! I can't carry on because some people are talking!", and I know some teachers constantly talk in a really calm quiet voice which seems to have a great effect but I'm not too great at... But certainly lowering your volume can sometimes work better than raising it. Likewise try to lower your pitch and cut under chat, not over, as they just get more excited.

    And remember not to keep them too long on the carpet! As this will have a big impact. Obviously try to make your input engaging but I know some children just don't give it a chance to be engaging before they are chatting away.

    Xxxx


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    (Original post by pgce2013)
    You can negotiate, I have been told that it is becoming more acceptable, you explain to them what additional qualities, experience etc you can bring.



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    I guess now that performance-related pay is in place it will become the norm. Although still a little unsure whether NQTs should try and negotiate or just grab the job offer and run!
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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    Some classes are unusually chatty! It's bit so much about being hard but being consistent and clear about your expectations. Try getting some "sitting on the carpet prompts" from twinkl or similar and every time you sit down refer to them. I edited the lips closed one and added "while someone else is talking", since I want to encourage a culture of open discussion about the book/topic we are looking at (that's the bit I find hardest! How to encourage that without undermining things). First, try to praise a good role model, mauve even with stickers. Then, when you call one of them up on it remind them why (then we can't hear and you can't hear, it will stop us learning etc). Next give a clear consequence (please make a good choice by showing me good sitting, otherwise you will have to move away from x). Refer back to the prompts all the time (mine are stuck up the side of the board). Stickers or a star chat/smiley chart whatever can work really well and you can fade out as they get better. I also find amateur dramatics can work wonders... Closing the book and pulling a fed up face "oh no! I can't carry on because some people are talking!", and I know some teachers constantly talk in a really calm quiet voice which seems to have a great effect but I'm not too great at... But certainly lowering your volume can sometimes work better than raising it. Likewise try to lower your pitch and cut under chat, not over, as they just get more excited.

    And remember not to keep them too long on the carpet! As this will have a big impact. Obviously try to make your input engaging but I know some children just don't give it a chance to be engaging before they are chatting away.

    Xxxx


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    Thanks for that, some good advice. I do think I have to keep physically pointing to the 'good listening, good sitting' images on the wall and stop the lesson totally if it gets out of hand. I have to show that I have them on point a lot more; if I do, I'm sure everything else will fall into place.

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    (Original post by qwerty_mad)
    Thanks for that, some good advice. I do think I have to keep physically pointing to the 'good listening, good sitting' images on the wall and stop the lesson totally if it gets out of hand. I have to show that I have them on point a lot more; if I do, I'm sure everything else will fall into place.

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    It is very tough... I had a very hard year 1/2 class in terms of chatting and low level disruption last year and I couldn't help but feel like I'd got past a point and 'lost' them. But I think my 'panic' then showed through to them. They KNEW I couldn't actually physically stop them all from chatting, and it was just a horrible feeling! But I feel like if I went back to that class now I have a lot more confidence so I could make my expectations clearer and get a better result.

    xxx
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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    It is very tough... I had a very hard year 1/2 class in terms of chatting and low level disruption last year and I couldn't help but feel like I'd got past a point and 'lost' them. But I think my 'panic' then showed through to them. They KNEW I couldn't actually physically stop them all from chatting, and it was just a horrible feeling! But I feel like if I went back to that class now I have a lot more confidence so I could make my expectations clearer and get a better result.

    xxx
    Yeah I see your point. It just proves that behaviour management is an ongoing process and that you'll improve with confidence and experience. That's another thing, expectation. I'm gonna have to make that more clear with them.

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    (Original post by bellylaugh)
    I guess now that performance-related pay is in place it will become the norm. Although still a little unsure whether NQTs should try and negotiate or just grab the job offer and run!
    Personally I wouldn't try and negotiate as an NQT. At the end of the day you have very little experience in the world of teaching so for them to take you on is a risk. Money wise it's not a massive risk for them though so that's probably one of the key reasons they take chances on NQTs over an experienced but more costly teacher.

    At the start of the year we were told to be selective when it came to jobs but realistically you don't want to go through a tough training year only to go on the dole at the end of it. You need that foot on the ladder. I'm not saying accept a job even if you know it's not right for you but there's being selective and being foolish - your career will hopefully be a long one and there's plenty of time to pick and choose and negotiate for more money later on when you have exam result stats, wider contributions etc to back you up. For now there's not really a lot you could say to a potential employer that will make them think they should be paying you more than any other NQT, particularly in today's world where cost cutting is everything for schools.
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    (Original post by Steveluis10)
    Personally I wouldn't try and negotiate as an NQT. At the end of the day you have very little experience in the world of teaching so for them to take you on is a risk. Money wise it's not a massive risk for them though so that's probably one of the key reasons they take chances on NQTs over an experienced but more costly teacher.

    At the start of the year we were told to be selective when it came to jobs but realistically you don't want to go through a tough training year only to go on the dole at the end of it. You need that foot on the ladder. I'm not saying accept a job even if you know it's not right for you but there's being selective and being foolish - your career will hopefully be a long one and there's plenty of time to pick and choose and negotiate for more money later on when you have exam result stats, wider contributions etc to back you up. For now there's not really a lot you could say to a potential employer that will make them think they should be paying you more than any other NQT, particularly in today's world where cost cutting is everything for schools.
    Yes I see your point, but once you've been offered a job there is no harm in asking I guess? Worst that can happen is that they say no! It's all just so different from working in the private sector where you would never even interview for a job without knowing the salary, and you'd certainly be expected to negotiate. Teaching does appear to be very different to this.
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    Urghh got one week left of the holidays and I literally have no motivation to do anything.

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    3 days left for me is it normal to become completely disillusioned with the whole course at this point? I don't know how much more I can take of having my every move watched every lesson and having to do bloody plans and reflections.
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    Hi all. I'm starting a PGCE with School Direct in September and am starting to freak out a bit. In my current job (also teaching) I work long hours and often don't get home until 7 or 8, and sometimes do more work in the evenings, so I am used to a heavy workload. However I'm hearing a lot of horror stories so I suppose what I'm asking is: A) Is it manageable? B) Is it worth it? and C) Can anyone offer any advice? Many thanks in advance!
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    (Original post by SortOfATeacher)
    Hi all. I'm starting a PGCE with School Direct in September and am starting to freak out a bit. In my current job (also teaching) I work long hours and often don't get home until 7 or 8, and sometimes do more work in the evenings, so I am used to a heavy workload. However I'm hearing a lot of horror stories so I suppose what I'm asking is: A) Is it manageable? B) Is it worth it? and C) Can anyone offer any advice? Many thanks in advance!
    Your in the routine so it shouldn't be a shock. It is manageable and everything will get done, it just does somehow.

    Is it worth it? Well that's the question I keep asking myself. I just hope it is. I entered the profession to help society and make a significance difference to a young persons life, however is it worth being treated low and being demoralised. Well I hope it's just the case for the PGCE year and things could only get better. You need to be dedicated and committed.


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    Thanks for replying and well done for getting through so far. When you say you are 'treated low and demoralised', do you mean by pupils or staff? And, can I just ask, what subject do you teach?
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    (Original post by SortOfATeacher)
    Thanks for replying and well done for getting through so far. When you say you are 'treated low and demoralised', do you mean by pupils or staff? And, can I just ask, what subject do you teach?
    I mean staff, I just feel as if I am between being a student and employee but without any rights. We are in a difficult situation whilst on placement. I wouldn't like to disclose my subject however I am in secondary.

    It's not all doom and gloom, I enjoy seeing pupils tick and grasp a concept.

    You mentioned you are on schools direct so will be treated more like you are part of the team and hopefully your hard work acknowledged. Remember your first few weeks will be the hardest, you will feel like giving up. Once you've made the first few weeks it will get easier.

    First weeks are difficult because :

    New routines
    Getting to know pupils
    Getting to know the building
    Getting your head around your timetable and classes
    Starting to teach
    Lesson planning
    Data sheets
    Seating plans
    Behaviour management ( it's vital you get this in order to make your life easier, even if it means taking time out)
    Understating SOW
    New staff

    The list is endless, however after a few weeks the list above will be narrowed.


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