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    Hey, does anyone have a link to the 2014 paper? Want to do a bit of question spotting but only June 2013 comes up on the OCR past paper thing!! Thanks )
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    (Original post by TheLegalDealer)
    Do you have a model answer for sequencing a genome as people are on about BACs even though its in none of my textbooks nor in te spec<br />
    <br />
    Thanks In advance !
    BAC is literally just recombinant DNA in a plasmid.

    BAC is bacterial artificial chromosome, essentially a plasmid with your desired DNA inserted into it. Nothing big
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    (Original post by BenCole2504)
    Hey, does anyone have a link to the 2014 paper? Want to do a bit of question spotting but only June 2013 comes up on the OCR past paper thing!! Thanks )
    Here. I uploaded the mark scheme a couple of pages back (or you can search through my post history)
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    Sorry to wander off topic a little, but are there any predicted grade boundaries for the F214 exam? Would like a rough idea of what marks/UMS I need in F215 to get an A*. Cheers and good luck!
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    (Original post by Lighfy)
    Sorry to wander off topic a little, but are there any predicted grade boundaries for the F214 exam? Would like a rough idea of what marks/UMS I need in F215 to get an A*. Cheers and good luck!
    I think judging from how difficult people found it, I think they're going to be on the lower range of what they've been before - so 40 for an A, 45 for 90%.
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    (Original post by ChoccyPhilly)
    BAC is literally just recombinant DNA in a plasmid.

    BAC is bacterial artificial chromosome, essentially a plasmid with your desired DNA inserted into it. Nothing big
    So if a Q on this comes up what do i say exactly ?
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    (Original post by ktdogan)
    I think we just need to know the basic idea of the homeobox sequences and how they control the development of the body plan. I don't think we need to know the drosophila example, but it will probably help to have a rough idea of it.
    Ah. Thanks- will just go over the page then
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    (Original post by EvasiveRose)
    Is that the question about the triplet codons?
    Yeah. Could you explain if maybe even background info we need to know as well because most likely I'll need thah to understand it?
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    (Original post by loperdoper)
    Just to check - you mean "Using the information in Fig. 5.1, list the three triplet codons that would cause termination of a polypeptide chain (stop codons) and explain why these codons have this effect."

    The three triplet codons are just the ones that code for "stop" - so following the diagram, this is UAA, UAG, and UGA (read from the diagram).

    They code for a "stop" because, whilst there is a tRNA with the complementary anticodon, there is no associated amino acid on the tRNA. This means the amino acid on the previous tRNA has nothing to create a peptide bond with, and the whole chain breaks away from the tRNA and therefore forms the primary structure.
    Thanks! I'll have a look tomorrow and see if I get it also could you list me the adv of each innate and learning behaviour so habituation classical c operant C and innate:reflexes taxes and kinnesis?
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    (Original post by Student23478)
    Thanks! I'll have a look tomorrow and see if I get it also could you list me the adv of each innate and learning behaviour so habituation classical c operant C and innate:reflexes taxes and kinnesis?
    Adv
    Innate: Learnt from birth, stereotyped, does the right thing first time, less complex organisms can have it

    Learning: Can adapt to enviroment, can be more complex.
    The main specific advantages I can name for this is
    habituation: learns to filter out unimportant stimuli in order to concentrate on any unfamiliar stimuli that can crop up
    operant: learns to get reward which can be a benefit
    imprinting: learns to follow parents so they don't get separated as anatomy doesn't allow for same kind of "clinging on" as other species.
    insight: can be faster than trial-and-error, more complex

    classic and latent learning don't really have any specific advantages outside of the general learning advantages to be honest, the same with specific types of innate behaviour.
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    (Original post by loperdoper)
    Adv
    Innate: Learnt from birth, stereotyped, does the right thing first time, less complex organisms can have it

    Learning: Can adapt to enviroment, can be more complex.
    The main specific advantages I can name for this is
    habituation: learns to filter out unimportant stimuli in order to concentrate on any unfamiliar stimuli that can crop up
    operant: learns to get reward which can be a benefit
    imprinting: learns to follow parents so they don't get separated as anatomy doesn't allow for same kind of "clinging on" as other species.
    insight: can be faster than trial-and-error, more complex

    classic and latent learning don't really have any specific advantages outside of the general learning advantages to be honest, the same with specific types of innate behaviour.
    You could say an advantage for classic is that you can train an animal to prepare to respond to a certain stimulus.
    Latent could be useful in escaping predators. A rabbit can explore burrows and retain the information so it could quickly escape if a predator comes.
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    (Original post by a123a)
    You could say an advantage for classic is that you can train an animal to prepare to respond to a certain stimulus.
    Latent could be useful in escaping predators. A rabbit can explore burrows and retain the information so it could quickly escape if a predator comes.
    How about innate advantages eg kinesis and taxes as it's come up in exams before
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    (Original post by a123a)
    You could say an advantage for classic is that you can train an animal to prepare to respond to a certain stimulus.
    Latent could be useful in escaping predators. A rabbit can explore burrows and retain the information so it could quickly escape if a predator comes.
    True, I don't have a textbook next to me or anything so it was just what immediately came to me tbh
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    Could someone please summarise/explain this point from spec to me, like what do you exactly need to know.
    "Dicuss how the links btween a range of human behaviours and the dopamine receptor DRD4 may contribute to the understanding oh human behaviour."
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    (Original post by Student23478)
    How about innate advantages eg kinesis and taxes as it's come up in exams before
    I think one generic one is to avoid predation?
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    (Original post by Mousyy)
    my least revised for exam and I know I'm gonna regret it :'(
    OMG same I hate F215 I'm so worried about it especially after F214 which I revised for
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    Why is sterile air entered into fermentation vessels rather than normal air?
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    Why do the cells on the shaded side of stems elongate faster? in terms of plant growth and auxins?
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    Because the auxin distributes to the shaded side of the leaf. Auxin causes cell elongation by promoting the active transport of protons onto the cell wall by ATPase enzymes. The low pH is optimum for expansins to work which break bonds in the cellulose so the walls can expand as they take in water.
    As a result the plant bends towards the light

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    What are the steps involved in the sequencing of a human genome?
 
 
 
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