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    (Original post by Krish4791)
    or Nadal, for that matter

    But Djokovic is still the best player in the world, and possibly the best I've seen on slow hard courts. He is calm and professional in press conferences. The only thing I would say is that he shouldn't care what others think of him - if he focuses solely on his game and is able to shut the crowd out of his mind he'll be more successful in the biggest matches on the biggest stages.
    The one thing I dislike is the overuse of slow courts, you can see the difference in results between the finals in dubai and indian wells and miami, don't get me wrong, djokovic is a great player and deserves to be no.1 but his somewhat "easy" journey to getting all grand slams shouldn't be as easy as the media portray it to be. I still think nadal will retain his french open but wouldn't be surprised if djokovic takes it, wimbledon should be the most interesting, hoping for federer to get his 8th there.
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    I just think that when Federer swears at umpires and Nadal barges into opponents due to their huge support it never gets spoken about but those are the perks of being established as champions first... With regards to Djokovic having it easy, well winning slams in an era with Nadal, Federer, Murray and other challengers is no easy feat. I also agree that Djokovic should try and block the crowd out but that's easier said than done and not something Federer and Nadal have to deal with so any comparison there is unfair. Either way I can admire all tennis players who play well and seem like decent players off the court too so despite their moments I can be happy for most players when they win
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    (Original post by ThatMadClown)
    this french open should be interesting, hopefully nadals back to full health, personally I'm looking forward to the grass swing...
    Same, Lopez could do really well!
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    (Original post by ThatMadClown)
    The one thing I dislike is the overuse of slow courts, you can see the difference in results between the finals in dubai and indian wells and miami, don't get me wrong, djokovic is a great player and deserves to be no.1 but his somewhat "easy" journey to getting all grand slams shouldn't be as easy as the media portray it to be. I still think nadal will retain his french open but wouldn't be surprised if djokovic takes it, wimbledon should be the most interesting, hoping for federer to get his 8th there.
    Indians Wells and Miami are fine as slow HCs. But I think tournaments like US Open, Paris Bercy and WTF should be fast. There should be more variety indeed.
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    (Original post by The_K1NG)
    Indians Wells and Miami are fine as slow HCs. But I think tournaments like US Open, Paris Bercy and WTF should be fast. There should be more variety indeed.
    The US Open is medium-fast (seen it up close) - it's fast enough. But I agree definitely that Bercy and the WTF should be quicker. It's odd they slowed Paris down in the past couple of years - I remember the year recently, 2012 or 2013 I think, when Llodra made it to the semi final by serve volleying. Weird that with that kind of success for a French player the French decided to slow it down.

    The WTF has improved, but in its first year, it was a terrible surface, and I've never really liked it. Both the speed and the bounce are horrible. A counter-argument that could be made for the reason the WTF should be kept a slow hard court however, is that is supposedly the most level surface for the top 8 to compete on. If we have it on grass, Federer would have probably won even more WTFs than he already has, and I reckon Murray would have one as well. If it were on clay, Nadal would undoubtedly have won one by now, if on fast HC Federer would have dominated even more, and so on.
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    (Original post by Sirocco11)
    The US Open is medium-fast (seen it up close) - it's fast enough. But I agree definitely that Bercy and the WTF should be quicker. It's odd they slowed Paris down in the past couple of years - I remember the year recently, 2012 or 2013 I think, when Llodra made it to the semi final by serve volleying. Weird that with that kind of success for a French player the French decided to slow it down.

    The WTF has improved, but in its first year, it was a terrible surface, and I've never really liked it. Both the speed and the bounce are horrible. A counter-argument that could be made for the reason the WTF should be kept a slow hard court however, is that is supposedly the most level surface for the top 8 to compete on. If we have it on grass, Federer would have probably won even more WTFs than he already has, and I reckon Murray would have one as well. If it were on clay, Nadal would undoubtedly have won one by now, if on fast HC Federer would have dominated even more, and so on.
    courts have been slowed down to suit djokovic and players who enjoy participating in longer rallies rather than attack by serving and volleying, which is silly...
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    (Original post by ThatMadClown)
    courts have been slowed down to suit djokovic and players who enjoy participating in longer rallies rather than attack by serving and volleying, which is silly...
    I very much doubt that Djokovic or any other player has enough influence to get the ATP and the slams to slow down all their courts so that they can win tournaments. That's the way the game has progressed so that it's predominantly played at the baseline rather than at the net. All sports transition, tennis is no different
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    (Original post by lizzy95)
    I very much doubt that Djokovic or any other player has enough influence to get the ATP and the slams to slow down all their courts so that they can win tournaments. That's the way the game has progressed so that it's predominantly played at the baseline rather than at the net. All sports transition, tennis is no different
    You guys might already be aware of this, but the real reason for the gradual slowing down of the courts was the 1994 Wimbledon Final between Pete Sampras and Goran Ivanisevic
    Interesting article here:

    http://burnstennis.blogspot.co.uk/20...tennis_10.html

    Of course, Wimbledon itself didn't really slow down until around 2001/2002. The other key reason for the slowing down was to compensate for advances in racket technology - presumably to avoid complete serve-fests with the more powerful sticks.

    I remember Fed's early days (2000-ish) where he did serve & volley a hell of a lot. However, he really started dominating the tour as an aggressive baseliner with a great serve and good touch at net. Nadal and now Djokovic have further transformed the game into a pure baseline game - a more physically demanding version of the sport which demands greater fitness, superior movement and greater athleticism
    Before the back surgery, Murray was also a great example of the modern tennis player.
    The superior movement and athleticism at the top of the game have also meant that it's harder for the younger guys to break through.
    There are a few S&V players around still (Llodra leaving, Stakhovsky) but the key to competing and beating Djokovic, the best in the business, is to have a great all-court game.
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    (Original post by Krish4791)
    You guys might already be aware of this, but the real reason for the gradual slowing down of the courts was the 1994 Wimbledon Final between Pete Sampras and Goran Ivanisevic
    Interesting article here:

    http://burnstennis.blogspot.co.uk/20...tennis_10.html

    Of course, Wimbledon itself didn't really slow down until around 2001/2002. The other key reason for the slowing down was to compensate for advances in racket technology - presumably to avoid complete serve-fests with the more powerful sticks.

    I remember Fed's early days (2000-ish) where he did serve & volley a hell of a lot. However, he really started dominating the tour as an aggressive baseliner with a great serve and good touch at net. Nadal and now Djokovic have further transformed the game into a pure baseline game - a more physically demanding version of the sport which demands greater fitness, superior movement and greater athleticism
    Before the back surgery, Murray was also a great example of the modern tennis player.
    The superior movement and athleticism at the top of the game have also meant that it's harder for the younger guys to break through.
    There are a few S&V players around still (Llodra leaving, Stakhovsky) but the key to competing and beating Djokovic, the best in the business, is to have a great all-court game.
    I still think serving and volleying with a touch of baseline rallying can help beat nadal/djokovic as shown by federer in the shanghai final last year, that being said the court suited his game more I guess..havent seen a fed/nadal match in a long time so hoping they do play a one soon
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    (Original post by Krish4791)
    You guys might already be aware of this, but the real reason for the gradual slowing down of the courts was the 1994 Wimbledon Final between Pete Sampras and Goran Ivanisevic
    Interesting article here:

    http://burnstennis.blogspot.co.uk/20...tennis_10.html

    Of course, Wimbledon itself didn't really slow down until around 2001/2002. The other key reason for the slowing down was to compensate for advances in racket technology - presumably to avoid complete serve-fests with the more powerful sticks.

    I remember Fed's early days (2000-ish) where he did serve & volley a hell of a lot. However, he really started dominating the tour as an aggressive baseliner with a great serve and good touch at net. Nadal and now Djokovic have further transformed the game into a pure baseline game - a more physically demanding version of the sport which demands greater fitness, superior movement and greater athleticism
    Before the back surgery, Murray was also a great example of the modern tennis player.
    The superior movement and athleticism at the top of the game have also meant that it's harder for the younger guys to break through.
    There are a few S&V players around still (Llodra leaving, Stakhovsky) but the key to competing and beating Djokovic, the best in the business, is to have a great all-court game.
    Yeah with regards to the younger generation I feel that the lack of a complete player is the reason why we haven't seen them consistently challenge the top guys. Raonic is just started to strengthen outside his serve, Dimitrov doesn't have the mental strength you need to see out the top guys in big matches which was evident during Wimbledon last year and the recent Australian Open, despite beating Andy he should've at least taken Novak to 5 and Nishikori, despite being the most complete of the new generation, in my opinion anyway, lacks a huge serve and is susceptible to getting overwhelmed in games by big hitters. I like Kyrgios because he's got a huge serve but the rest of his game isn't too far behind and in the future once the rest of his game catches up he could be dangerous. Of course, Delpo is someone with the game to blow away anyone, including the big 4 so hopefully he gets back to his best soon and we can see him in epic matches like his semi against Novak in Wimbledon '13 which for me was the match of the tournament
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    (Original post by ThatMadClown)
    courts have been slowed down to suit djokovic and players who enjoy participating in longer rallies rather than attack by serving and volleying, which is silly...
    Eh? That's just not true at all. The courts were slowed down with public enjoyment in mind, not because there's some kind of Illuminati conspiracy Djokovic is behind. Tennis which is just ace ad infinitum with a maximum of 3 shots is boring. There's a really bizarre nostalgia attached to it these days as if people suddenly forgot quite how boring that kind of tenins is, which is also to an extent linked to Federer fanatics droning on about speeding up the courts so he can win more easily. It has nothing to do with player influence.

    The reason players don't, as well as can't serve and volley these days, isn't just the surface. More and more players are excellent returners and it's become more of a risk to charge in behind a serve. It's commonly known with the rise of the two handed backhand that the serve can be more readily neutralised by the returner.
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    (Original post by Sirocco11)
    Eh? That's just not true at all. The courts were slowed down with public enjoyment in mind, not because there's some kind of Illuminati conspiracy Djokovic is behind. Tennis which is just ace ad infinitum with a maximum of 3 shots is boring. There's a really bizarre nostalgia attached to it these days as if people suddenly forgot quite how boring that kind of tenins is, which is also to an extent linked to Federer fanatics droning on about speeding up the courts so he can win more easily. It has nothing to do with player influence.

    The reason players don't, as well as can't serve and volley these days, isn't just the surface. More and more players are excellent returners and it's become more of a risk to charge in behind a serve. It's commonly known with the rise of the two handed backhand that the serve can be more readily neutralised by the returner.
    I wasn't trying to say that djokovic is behind anything, too much of one thing can get boring, be it constant baseline rallying or constant serve and volleying, if a player puts variety then its better.
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    Looks like Nikishori did enough, he breaks the top 4 (ranked 4th) as Nadal falls to fifth. I believe this is the first time it's happened without injuries.

    In his bid to please me Tomic matches the ranking of 27th he achieved at 19. He now defends just 26 points on clay so plenty of room to gain.

    (Original post by lizzy95)
    Yeah with regards to the younger generation I feel that the lack of a complete player is the reason why we haven't seen them consistently challenge the top guys. Raonic is just started to strengthen outside his serve, Dimitrov doesn't have the mental strength you need to see out the top guys in big matches which was evident during Wimbledon last year and the recent Australian Open, despite beating Andy he should've at least taken Novak to 5 and Nishikori, despite being the most complete of the new generation, in my opinion anyway, lacks a huge serve and is susceptible to getting overwhelmed in games by big hitters. I like Kyrgios because he's got a huge serve but the rest of his game isn't too far behind and in the future once the rest of his game catches up he could be dangerous. Of course, Delpo is someone with the game to blow away anyone, including the big 4 so hopefully he gets back to his best soon and we can see him in epic matches like his semi against Novak in Wimbledon '13 which for me was the match of the tournament
    Largely agree with this.

    Bar Del Potro who i think has the potential to dominate for years if fit i suspect that Nikishori/Raonic/Dimitrov could be akin to Hewitt/Rodick in the sense that they are just stop gaps until the next true greats come along. I mean the youngest guy in the top 30 is Tomic and he's not there mentally.

    Apparently there are 8 teens in the top 100 for the first time since 2007 (that pack produced Del Potro and Cilic) so it's possible that some of them could be the ones to watch..

    Nick Kyrgios (AUS)
    Borna Coric (CRO)
    Alexander Zverev (GER)
    Thanasi Kokkinakis (AUS)
    Hyeon Chung (KOR)
    Yoshihito Nishioka (JPN)
    Jared Donaldson (USA)
    Elias Ymer (SWE)

    Coric is the youngest guy to break the top 100 since Nadal in 03. Kyrigos turns 20 soon but has 2 QF's in slams.
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    (Original post by lizzy95)
    Yeah with regards to the younger generation I feel that the lack of a complete player is the reason why we haven't seen them consistently challenge the top guys. Raonic is just started to strengthen outside his serve, Dimitrov doesn't have the mental strength you need to see out the top guys in big matches which was evident during Wimbledon last year and the recent Australian Open, despite beating Andy he should've at least taken Novak to 5 and Nishikori, despite being the most complete of the new generation, in my opinion anyway, lacks a huge serve and is susceptible to getting overwhelmed in games by big hitters. I like Kyrgios because he's got a huge serve but the rest of his game isn't too far behind and in the future once the rest of his game catches up he could be dangerous. Of course, Delpo is someone with the game to blow away anyone, including the big 4 so hopefully he gets back to his best soon and we can see him in epic matches like his semi against Novak in Wimbledon '13 which for me was the match of the tournament
    Pretty much agree with you there, but I think Raonic is probably the best of these younger players (I'm slightly biased being a fan of his!). The only really obvious weakness of his is his backhand. I think he's the one that'll improve the most, I mean the development of that forehand and his baseline rallying from last season to now is pretty incredible.

    As for Dimitrov, he's very much naturally talented (like Federer, as everyone seems to say), but I don't see much else in him. Yeah, and he does tend to bottle it in big matches.
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    The thing with Dimitrov though is that he's not just been bottling it in the big matches, he hasn't shown an ounce of consistency this year. He's even lost the "smaller" matches as well.

    Brisbane semis: destroyed by Federer 2-6, 2-6
    AO R4: actually played well here, but Murray too good 4-6, 7-6, 3-6, 5-7
    Rotterdam R16: lost a match he shouldn't be losing if he wants to progress, to Gilles Muller 2-6, 6-7
    Acapulco R16: Bageled by Harrison in the 3rd set, nowhere near defending his title 5-7, 6-4, 0-6
    Indian Wells R32: lost to Robredo after some choking 4-6, 6-1, 5-7
    Miami R32: lost to John Isner, played an inexcusably poor 2nd set 6-7, 2-6

    Last year''s Wimbledon seems like a bit of an anomaly tbh. He does have a lot of great shots in his repertoire, and he was briefly in the Top 10, but I see the other guys in his age bracket doing better than him (Raonic, Nishikori). Bear in mind even Marin Cilic, who's only 2 years older than Dimitrov, has won a Slam. Nishikori has made 1 Slam Final, a few R4 and QFs and almost won a Masters last year.
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    The clay season will get underway very shortly, maybe someone new will make a move in the Masters events. Roland Garros is pretty much a two-way race. I don't care how awful Nadal is beforehand, he's just a different player when you put him on Chatrier Court.
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    (Original post by ThatMadClown)
    I wasn't trying to say that djokovic is behind anything, too much of one thing can get boring, be it constant baseline rallying or constant serve and volleying, if a player puts variety then its better.
    Yeah now that I agree with you on. The way tennis is these days, I think an intelligent, effective player is able to both dictate from the baseline and win lengthy rallies, while having the foresight to serve and volley when it is the most surprising. The serve-volley is best used as a disruptive tactic in the modern game, to break up the pattern of play and exert pressure on the returner.
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    (Original post by Krish4791)
    The clay season will get underway very shortly, maybe someone new will make a move in the Masters events. Roland Garros is pretty much a two-way race. I don't care how awful Nadal is beforehand, he's just a different player when you put him on Chatrier Court.
    My sentiments exactly, Nadal will always be the favourite for me at RG until the day he loses or unless he doesn't play at all.
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    (Original post by lizzy95)
    My sentiments exactly, Nadal will always be the favourite for me at RG until the day he loses or unless he doesn't play at all.
    I'm so excited for roly g it's unreal haha. Itv again I suppose?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    Yep, ITV4 from 24th May - still some way to go though


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