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    (Original post by lantan)
    :flowers:

    I think your two cents are worth more than a million.
    I also hope, that your health is restored now.
    That's tremendously sweet of you. Thank you. Yes, I'm fine now (touch wood and all that kind of thing.)
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    (Original post by TraineeLynsey)
    Excellent words of wisdom as always, CarnationLilyRose.

    I've finally been invited for an interview - y3 maternity cover in a LOVELY school. Almost wish I didn't like the school though, as it's my first interview. The pressure is definitely on!

    Pretty sure I know what I'm doing for my observation, just need to do a lot of interview prep now. Nervous!
    Thank you. I wish you all the very best with your interview.
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    (Original post by outlaw-torn)
    Just got my first job eekkk!!

    Didn't even know what to say to them, was in shock! So happy though, and I can't wait to start in September. It's a challenging school but I'm looking forward to it,

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    Congratulations!
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    (Original post by Piggsil)
    You are so right, as usual. Thanks again, and I hope your all good again now health-wise (my health scare was nowhere near as serious, but enough to really make me think).
    You also make a great point about kids moving on quickly from great teachers. I think I miss my old class more than they miss me. I really want to go back and see them. But changing jobs was necessary for me, to prevent me ending up hating the career and burning out. (Moved from a school where test scores are the be all and end all to one where there is more [but still not enough, I don't think that school exists these days!] focus on child development).

    I am in awe of people like you that make it to retirement. My mum has been going since the early 70s and fairly recently moved departments (humanities -> lead SENCO !) and she amazes me. Tbf she had many, many years of part time due to us 4 children, but by no means has that made it easier on her. I think she has been very good at doing what you describe - doing what she needed to get by and relying on experience. She also got lucky after they abolished grammar schools in the county in 1984. Her and my dad worked at the same secondary modern. She was put in the comp she still works in now (I went to it, it's a nice, pretty "soft" school).

    My dad, on the other hand, got put in a comp in a different town, totally different type of kid, plus was always managed terribly. He had to take forced early retirement 2 years ago (aged 59) after a loooooooong period of sick leave. He also had one other 6-month period of sick leave I remember in my early teens. His health (both physical and mental) is completely destroyed. But he was HoD, had 4 kids, mortgage etc...he felt pressurised to carry on. I have realised that it is NEVER worth it now. I wish he'd got out when he'd had the chance. We would have had to make sacrifices, but we would have survived.
    Well, I totally take my hat off to your mum, who must have done ten years more than me, by the sound of it. Good for her. As for your dad, I sincerely hope he is ok now. His is a terribly common story, although I suspect that it will become less common over time, not because the job is getting easier - quite the reverse - but because I think people will quit sooner. There seems to be a greater recognition of the stresses of the job now than there was when your parents and I started out, and I think fewer people will feel the obligation to stick it out to retirement. I think the job is almost undoable in some schools and people won't stick at it. Heaven knows what will become of society then.

    I'm ultra-impressed that you are going into teaching despite your parents' experience. Both spouse and I must have moaned far too much because neither of ours have any intention of doing it, although the older one teaches TEFL abroad, a very different kettle of fish, I think. Good luck in your new school.
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    (Original post by outlaw-torn)
    Just got my first job eekkk!!

    Didn't even know what to say to them, was in shock! So happy though, and I can't wait to start in September. It's a challenging school but I'm looking forward to it,

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    Well done!
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    (Original post by outlaw-torn)
    Just got my first job eekkk!!

    Didn't even know what to say to them, was in shock! So happy though, and I can't wait to start in September. It's a challenging school but I'm looking forward to it,

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Congratulations!
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    (Original post by outlaw-torn)
    Just got my first job eekkk!!

    Didn't even know what to say to them, was in shock! So happy though, and I can't wait to start in September. It's a challenging school but I'm looking forward to it,

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Well done


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    Review 3 over and assignment handed in. My tutor says I should come out as an outstanding trainee! I'm not fussed if I'm good or outstanding to be honest but it's nice to know.

    Once the tutor observes me on Tuesday I'll just be counting the days down then. 22 teaching days left!
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    Teaching over! I got graded 'Good' which I'm so happy about considering I was on Cause for Concern for some time - had a crap tutor but amazing mentor. Got to go school in a week for two weeks tondo some other things but not teach. So for me it's more or less over. Now for finding that job!

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    (Original post by qwerty_mad)
    Teaching over! I got graded 'Good' which I'm so happy about considering I was on Cause for Concern for some time - had a crap tutor but amazing mentor. Got to go school in a week for two weeks tondo some other things but not teach. So for me it's more or less over. Now for finding that job!

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    Congrats!!
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    Two weeks to go, I am overwhelmed with my work load at this point. Just don't know where to start.


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    Six weeks to go. I have both my SLT and ULT doing two seperate observations on Monday. It's taking me so long to plan and resource those I've not even started on the rest of the week yet! I've decided I'm not going to do my NQT year in September but even the thought of another six weeks of this makes me feel sick.
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    I've been told that I should 'take some risks' now by my tutor as she said I've already got a job, should come out outstanding and that it's time to experiment but I don't really know what this means.

    For my lesson on Tuesday she is coming to see I have just planned it - I think all my tasks link to the objective, are clear and pitched right for the class but I don't think it's particularly risky or exciting. We are constantly told all that matters is to show progress and how you get there is up to you yet we're then told we need to take risks, create a buzz about the lesson and make everything engaging. Which is more important?
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    (Original post by Sarang_assa)
    Six weeks to go. I have both my SLT and ULT doing two seperate observations on Monday. It's taking me so long to plan and resource those I've not even started on the rest of the week yet! I've decided I'm not going to do my NQT year in September but even the thought of another six weeks of this makes me feel sick.
    Why is SLT observing?

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    (Original post by Steveluis10)
    I've been told that I should 'take some risks' now by my tutor as she said I've already got a job, should come out outstanding and that it's time to experiment but I don't really know what this means.

    For my lesson on Tuesday she is coming to see I have just planned it - I think all my tasks link to the objective, are clear and pitched right for the class but I don't think it's particularly risky or exciting. We are constantly told all that matters is to show progress and how you get there is up to you yet we're then told we need to take risks, create a buzz about the lesson and make everything engaging. Which is more important?
    Both, you need to engage AND show progress. Which is why it's so hard.
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    (Original post by Sarang_assa)
    Six weeks to go. I have both my SLT and ULT doing two seperate observations on Monday. It's taking me so long to plan and resource those I've not even started on the rest of the week yet! I've decided I'm not going to do my NQT year in September but even the thought of another six weeks of this makes me feel sick.
    Join the club, I think we are going through a phase, I'm dreading the last few weeks.


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    (Original post by Steveluis10)
    I've been told that I should 'take some risks' now by my tutor as she said I've already got a job, should come out outstanding and that it's time to experiment but I don't really know what this means.

    For my lesson on Tuesday she is coming to see I have just planned it - I think all my tasks link to the objective, are clear and pitched right for the class but I don't think it's particularly risky or exciting. We are constantly told all that matters is to show progress and how you get there is up to you yet we're then told we need to take risks, create a buzz about the lesson and make everything engaging. Which is more important?
    By take risks she doesn't necessarily mean name the lesson crazy/exciting in itself. She just means try different things and that might include a more exciting lesson.

    Yes you want to show progress but that can be delivered in a variety of ways depending on the thing you're teaching. For example, I did a pretend Friday night dinner for judaism in KS1. It didn't follow the normal "lesson format" but hopefully would be something the children would remember and which would draw their interest. Plus it's fun... Remember they are children and they deserve to enjoy their childhood and learn through that. In terms of your assessment though you're right, progress is key and, for example, the big O can't judge you in teaching methods in themselves.

    But risks might be something different. Like re-jigging how you use your time in a lesson, getting the pupils to work together in different ways, working on a longer project across lessons, trying out a new assessment method... Anything that you've heard about in training and gone "Wow, that sounds great!" but not had a chance to try out.

    Xxx


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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    By take risks she doesn't necessarily mean name the lesson crazy/exciting in itself. She just means try different things and that might include a more exciting lesson.

    Yes you want to show progress but that can be delivered in a variety of ways depending on the thing you're teaching. For example, I did a pretend Friday night dinner for judaism in KS1. It didn't follow the normal "lesson format" but hopefully would be something the children would remember and which would draw their interest. Plus it's fun... Remember they are children and they deserve to enjoy their childhood and learn through that. In terms of your assessment though you're right, progress is key and, for example, the big O can't judge you in teaching methods in themselves.

    But risks might be something different. Like re-jigging how you use your time in a lesson, getting the pupils to work together in different ways, working on a longer project across lessons, trying out a new assessment method... Anything that you've heard about in training and gone "Wow, that sounds great!" but not had a chance to try out.

    Xxx


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    That Judaism lesson sounds amazing btw! Stealing that idea when I next have to teach RE (I don't really enjoy teaching RE so atm I teach both classes in my year group English and the other teacher does the RE in both classes).

    I agree, it's definitely worth breaking away from traditional lesson formats sometimes. I have done French/Spanish cafes where I've bought in food, the kids sit in groups and have to order food from the menus. I should do this in English one time.

    Another big hit is "treasure hunts" outside. Make and laminate questions about the topic you're currently learning, or as a revision for a longer period, that you hang up outside. They work in groups to find the questions and answer them (I make answer sheets with the correct number of questions so they know how many they have to find). This can work with all ages, and you can make it a map-reading exercise as well.

    Walking dictation is another cool activity. I hang words or texts outside the classroom and they have to walk out, "collect" the word and come back and write it down. Helps to have an assistant outside the room if you're worried about behaviour.
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    (Original post by Piggsil)
    That Judaism lesson sounds amazing btw! Stealing that idea when I next have to teach RE (I don't really enjoy teaching RE so atm I teach both classes in my year group English and the other teacher does the RE in both classes).

    I got it from a lady who came in to our PGCE. She leads them herself in the Norfolk area for money and she did it lots better than me lol! But it was a fun activity, we talked about the prayers used, lit a candle, tasted 'wine' (grape juice) and shared bread and did a dance at the end.

    xxx
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    Soooo..... after 33 application forms and 6 interviews I finally got my job. Very-very pleased.
 
 
 
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