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OCR Biology F212 Revision [3rd June 2013] (Now Closed) Watch

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    (Original post by HeyMickey6)
    Do we need to know how it's made tho ?
    No but you need to be aware of the advantages and disadvantages of it.
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    Can the same question come up consecutively

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    (Original post by alby37135)
    I prefer Kate Please Come Over For Gay Sex
    thank you sir!
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    (Original post by wndms)
    What are the differences between platlets, blood clot and thrombus? So confoozle

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    PLATELETS are a part of the blood that forms a BLOOD CLOT when a blood vessel becomes damaged.

    THROMBUS is another fancy word for blood clot.
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    (Original post by ThePremierLeague)
    hi - i have a question about selective breeding?

    im doing a paper from jan11 and im confused on this 2 mark question...

    'suggest two undesirable consequences of selective breeding in chickens' (2)

    the mark scheme says:
    growth too rapid ;
    increased susceptibility to, disease / named abnormality ;
    inbreeding ;
    reduces gene pool / genetic variation / genetic diversity ;

    but i still dont understand :/

    thanks in advance for any help
    I have done this question before and wrote the first and third points as my answers. This is the way I was thinking in order to answer them


    Growth too rapid: A few reasons why chickens growing too quickly might be a unwanted consequence are:

    1. Not everyone likes big chickens, some people may want smaller chickens to cook and eat. Also, some scientific research is carried out on chicks, so if they grow too quickly, this scientific research cannot be done.

    reduces gene pool / genetic variation / genetic diversity: There are several types of chickens that exist. Big, small, skinny, fat, ability to grow quickly, ability to produce eggs faster etc. If we only bred chickens that grew quickly then we would eventually lose these characteristics and only have fast growing chickens.

    Inbreeding: Think of it like this....incest

    increased susceptibility to, disease / named abnormality: Once again, incest. If two family members have a child together, it is said that the child is more likely to have an abnormality.

    Hope this helps! I feel silly talking about chickens
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    (Original post by Delz101)
    PLATELETS are a part of the blood that forms a BLOOD CLOT when a blood vessel becomes damaged.

    THROMBUS is another fancy word for blood clot.
    An embolism is a blood clot that moves around the body.
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    (Original post by Liamnut)
    An embolism is a blood clot that moves around the body.
    What can a clot moving around in the body eventually lead to??
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    (Original post by jamesmact)
    It is an afternoon exam I swear...?


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    It's a morning one just checked the OCR Timetable.
    http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/21659-j...ertificate.pdf
    Good thing you mentioned it
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    Hi sorry to ask again but I had no reply, does anybody know where I can find a jan 2013 mark scheme for f212, and also if there is a list or something like that that shows raw marks to ums in more detail (ie for 150, 140, 130 etc ums rather than just for each grade) thankyou 😊


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    Has anyone got any good tips off how to revise as ive done the majority of the past papers and just not sure what is another useful revision method
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    (Original post by imconfused)
    I was looking for past papers older than june 2009 for f212, however couldn't find any? r there any other pp apart e.g. 2008/2007...?
    PLEASE HELP
    There are some called 'human health and disease' and I think 'environmental biology' they are all old specification from ~2000-->2008 so you have to be picky and see which questions are actually still relevant, but its good practice


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    (Original post by simonb451)
    Has anyone got any good tips off how to revise as ive done the majority of the past papers and just not sure what is another useful revision method
    Pick a few large topics and write long answers (6-9 marks with a QWC) for them. It's good practice and if you get a similar question in the exam, you can just rattle it off.

    (Original post by Delz101)
    What can a clot moving around in the body eventually lead to??
    If the blood clot becomes dislodged, it can travel around the body until it reaches blood vessels which are too small, at that point it may block them entirely. Think about the effect a blocked blood vessel could have if it was in the brain.
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    [QUOTE=HarryMWilliams;42855009]Pick a few large topics and write long answers (6-9 marks with a QWC) for them. It's good practice and if you get a similar question in the exam, you can just rattle it off.


    Thats a good idea i did that for the first exam Thankyou
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    hey, is the 'humoral response' the same thing as the 'non-specific immune response' ?
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    [QUOTE=simonb451;42855037]
    (Original post by HarryMWilliams)
    Pick a few large topics and write long answers (6-9 marks with a QWC) for them. It's good practice and if you get a similar question in the exam, you can just rattle it off.

    Could u suggest some topics ? Please and thankyou xx

    Thats a good idea i did that for the first exam Thankyou



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    any ideas on topics that are going to come up?
    areas to revise?

    help will be much appreciated - thankyou!
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    would someone be able to explain transcription of RNA and the things we need to know about tRNA and mRNA please?
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    (Original post by mel1995)
    would someone be able to explain transcription of RNA and the things we need to know about tRNA and mRNA please?
    mRNA is a copy of a gene/part of DNA. It transfers genetic information from DNA to ribosomes. RNA leaves the nucleus via nuclear pores and attaches to a ribosome on the RER. Ribosomes are made of rRNA. tRNA carries amino acids to ribosomes.

    Thats basically it, question 2b)ii) on the january 2013 paper is all you need to know about it
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    i dont get immunity/t/b lymphocytes/cell signalling etc...can someone pls give me a link for a good set of notes or good video that describes it clearly. THANKYOU
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    (Original post by mel1995)
    would someone be able to explain transcription of RNA and the things we need to know about tRNA and mRNA please?
    Hey!
    Transcription doesn't involve tRNA. Transcription is when the DNA is being coded into mRNA. DNA helicase unzips the DNA for a certain gene. The RNA polymerase then reads the DNA and catalyses the formation of mRNA by complementary base pairing. This all occurs in the nucleus. The mRNA then leaves the nucleus via a nuclear pore and goes to the cytoplasm.
    Translation occurs now. This is at the ribosome. Basically an mRNA molecule is read by the ribosome. Three bases are called a codon. Each codon has a complementary anti codon (which are on tRNA molecules). They form temporary bonds to each other. The ribosome processes these codons and when complementary tRNA molecules bring amino acids. Adjacent amino acids form hydrogen bonds with each other (i'm not 100% sure if they're H bonds...). The ribosome eventually hits a stop codon and this is when the polypeptide chain is complete.
 
 
 
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