Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lucabrasi98)
    Is this bait? Civil engineering is the closest possible thing to "proper engineering" there is. Well joint with mechanical. Look at definitions:
    "the branch of science and technology concerned with the design, building, and use of engines, machines, and structures."

    " the work of designing and creating large structures (such as roads and bridges) or new products or systems by using scientific methods"

    "Engineering is the application of mathematics, empirical evidence and scientific, economic, social, and practical knowledge in order to invent, innovate, design, build, maintain, research, and improve structures, machines, tools, systems, components, materials, processes and organizations."

    And it probably has the most diverse job fields too. You can go into finance, work on land fills, skyscrapers, underground tunnels, regular railways, airports (one of the Manchester civil engineering lecturers helped design one of the heathrow terminals), dams, resevoirs, any smaller scale structure (e.g a house or apartment), roads, bridges, sports stadiums ect.

    Most popular engineering shows on TV is full of civil engineers. I thought you were going to say something like chemical or audio engineering. But what you're saying is so inaccurate that I can only assume you've confused "civil engineer" with being a surveyor, regular site manager or builder.

    Edit: And it's worth adding that it has the highest employment rate of all engineering disciplines according to prospect.com.
    I suppose audio engineering is another I wouldn't class as proper engineering. I know a few people who studied civil engineering, they all did well but they all said their course is quite easy


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Why has this thread become "why my degree is better than yours due to 'insert petty reason'"?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Underscore__)
    But medicine graduates earn, on average, more than economics or maths grads so that would make no sense. Studying medicine is a way to guarantee yourself a pretty good salary for life


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Factor in two extra years of lost earning, the expenses of working as a doctor, the moving up and down the country and the erratic hours - I would wager that your typical eco/maths grad would be doing better off.

    That said, the fact that medicine is a reliable income doesn't automatically mean every doctor is "in it for the money". Quite the opposite - I know many grad entry students who gave up very lucrative careers in finance and pharmaceuticals for one in medicine, taking a massive paycut in doing so.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lkathryn08)
    Why has this thread become "why my degree is better than yours due to 'insert petty reason'"?
    ikr it is predominantly the medicine lovers.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Underscore__)
    I suppose audio engineering is another I wouldn't class as proper engineering. I know a few people who studied civil engineering, they all did well but they all said their course is quite easy


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    It may be possible that they were just very good at the subject? Or the university wasn't that good? Imperial has A*A*A requirements for it and idk anyone from there that finds it easy. But even ignoring that, it doesn't make sense to use how easy it is as an argument in the first place. The hardest (upon general consensus) is electrical which I heard just becomes ridiculously complicated in 3rd and 4th years. But I wouldn't call it the most "proper".

    Anyway, surely proper ones should be ones that actually fit the definition for engineering? Mechanical, Civil, Electrical and Aerospace are usually seen as the main ones. Maybe Chemical too. With the rest (e.g agricultural, sound, computer, biomedical, biological, materials ect.), you often see university's awarding Msci degrees for completing them instead of MEng degrees. Although obviously there are exceptions. . Especially at top Unis.

    (Original post by Etomidate)
    Factor in two extra years of lost earning, the expenses of working as a doctor, the moving up and down the country and the erratic hours - I would wager that your typical eco/maths grad would be doing better off.
    tbf, how significant is a 2 year loss in earning when you're looking at pay across their careers? And who said anything about moving around the country?

    Is it really a 2 year loss in earnings anyway? My cousins who did medicine said they got paid in the latter stages of the course. In addition to that, doesn't the NHS cover some of their student loans? So they don't pay as much as they normally would. It's also worth noting that you're essentially guaranteed a job right away if you complete a medicine degree. I know maths/eco grads who struggled to find jobs they wanted for months after. Some just settled for something they didn't really enjoy.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Medicine
    Maybe I'm just bitter though...
    Actually definitely bitter because I didn't get good enough GCSE's for it. But yay to those who are gonna take medicine!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Mate if medicine students were all about money they would have done dentistry lol
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    Medicine.

    People tie themselves up in knots stressing about 'getting into Med School' when actually if they applied to Medical Sciences they'd have a far easier time getting a place (no tortuous interview days for a start). AND they'd be contributing to 'saving lives' in a far more profound way than being a doctor because their research into Ebola, Cancer, Zika, antibiotic resistance etc will save thousands of lives not just a few. Its Medical Scientists who win Nobel Prizes, not GPs.
    This is such a dumb comparison. Plenty of medically qualified doctors who are/were practicing clinicians have won the Nobel Prize or made breakthroughs in public health which have helped entire populations rather than individuals. But since when was it a contest anyway?

    In a similar vein I could tell you not to study biomed since the person spinning down blood tests at your local hospital's lab won't ever win a Nobel Prize.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Law by far.

    You don't even need a law degree to become a lawyer looool

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    A lot of people do a law degree with the express desire of not becoming a lawyer because it opens so many other doors
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by connieiscrazy)
    A lot of people do a law degree with the express desire of not becoming a lawyer because it opens so many other doors
    I'll think you'll find most people do a law degree because they want to be lawyers but find out near the end that not everyone can become a lawyer with just a law degree.

    The cliche 'opens so many other doors' is true of 99% of degrees.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lucabrasi98)
    Chemistry isn't underrated. Even my old chemistry teacher called it an overrated degree. Only 52% get employment 6 months after completing their degree. 32% either have to do further study or take a second degree. That's not as bad as other subjects but it's still awful compared to other courses that have around 80% in employment right away.

    And English and Biology aren't overrated. But that's purely because no one cares about them enough to rate them in the first place (aside from people studying them.
    Where did you even get these stats from? You do realise its different for each university right?...

    It seems like your definition of overrated is the ability to get a job after 6 months... :lol:

    Average is more around 40/50% take further study. AKA go on to do further masters/PhD to go into research. I wouldnt call research overrated. The remaining go on into jobs such as industry/finance/law/education all of which i wouldnt call overrated.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Overrated: Any degree you're doing despite not having an interest in it.


    Underated: Physics/Eco/Maths/Chem (I know I do it).

    Maybe on TSR Phys/Math/Chem aren't so underrated however for the content of work and how difficult these degrees actually are, they are very underrated.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    f*****ing business or business & management or this type of subject. I know so many people doing this who have placements or grad jobs set up with huge companies. You'd think that with these types of opportunities employers are recognising the students' intelligence and so on.

    But oh my god speaking to some of them - one thought that David Cameron was still prime minister. Another thought Nigel Farage might win the next general election (on behalf of what party?!)
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by adesola15)
    Law and Psychology, everyone who doesn't know what they are doing with their lives does Law or Psychology because offers are so low in some universities.
    Lol, those are 2 of the most competitive courses to get onto at any good university anyway
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Sociology!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hihihi123)
    Lol, those are 2 of the most competitive courses to get onto at any good university anyway
    That's the point of the thread. A colossal amount of people want to take the course for various reasons. The prospects from actually graduating are relatively bad. Especially for psychology. Hence why they're overrated.

    In order for it to be overrated, loads of people have to rate it highly in the first place. Which is the exact reason why..

    (Original post by clucky_chick)
    Sociology!
    isn't overrated at all. The teachers in my old school used to regularly insult it lol
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by connieiscrazy)
    A lot of people do a law degree with the express desire of not becoming a lawyer because it opens so many other doors
    The problem is determining criteria for assessing whether a degree is 'overrated' or 'underrated'. If we're factoring in the idiots, who undoubtedly exist, who think that a law degree will magically make them lawyers, we also have to factor in the idiots who think that an economics degree will magically make them investment bankers, and so forth.

    The truth is that hard sciences open the most doors, because they confer and evidence special skills which are needed in scientific careers. The doors that are open to law grads are realistically open to everyone. Whether we really want to get into assessing the worth of a field of study on the basis of the raw number of opportunities it makes available to its graduates (regardless of whether individuals actually want to seize any given opportunity) is another question.

    Personally I don't like the general implication ITT that a degree is as valuable as the money-earning opportunities it leads to. This strikes me as less than entirely meaningful, since there are plenty of ways to make large amounts money that are open to all graduates. It also strikes me as a little sad that apparently many members of a student forum place no value on studying something that interests them.

    (Original post by lucabrasi98)
    Chemistry isn't underrated. Even my old chemistry teacher called it an overrated degree. Only 52% get employment 6 months after completing their degree. 32% either have to do further study or take a second degree.
    So actually perform well on your degree, develop your CV, and be part of the 52%. Unless you actually want to do further study, which a lot of people do.

    It's really no argument at all against doing a degree that a lot of people who take it don't go on to achieve great/immediate success. Just don't be one of those people.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cobalt_)
    Where did you even get these stats from? You do realise its different for each university right?...

    It seems like your definition of overrated is the ability to get a job after 6 months... :lol:

    Average is more around 40/50% take further study. AKA go on to do further masters/PhD to go into research. I wouldnt call research overrated. The remaining go on into jobs such as industry/finance/law/education all of which i wouldnt call overrated.
    1. https://www.prospects.ac.uk/careers-...gree/chemistry

    And so? That applies to every degree statistic. But you guys are the ones that claim university doesn't matter and social skills do. The results shouldn't vary much.

    2. It's overrated because it's literally rated higher than it should be. You're a living example of it. And 6 months is just the standard when looking at employment rates. Would you prefer if they looked at employment after 30 years?

    3. First off, your 40/50% stat is a blatant lie. Look at the link and scroll down.


    Secondly, I doubt people who are passionate enough to write their personal statements, spend 4 years at university getting a masters degree in chemistry, then spend additional years doing a postgrad, do so with the initial intention of going into finance, law or education. Many got non relevant jobs not because they want to, but because they have to. There will be some that genuinely want to switch career paths. But you act as if it's the majority. You're doing chemistry too I'm guessing? Don't you want a job in chemistry?

    19% become "technicians and other professions". 18% go into science. I already know through prior knowledge that technicians aren't very well paid. And "science" is very broad so I'm not sure what jobs they were actually talking about.

    As for research, unless you're lucky enough to get a grant, you're PAYING to do the research at the uni for your postgrad. After which you're stuck looking for a job again. But now you have the bonus of more debt.

    The only thing underrated about chemistry is the difficulty. I don't think many understand how difficult of a subject it is at university. People agree that it's relatively hard at A2 then act like Maths and Physics are the only hard university subjects.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hopefuldentist10)
    Mate if medicine students were all about money they would have done dentistry lol
    hahah :'D that is too true
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    Personally I don't like the general implication ITT that a degree is as valuable as the money-earning opportunities it leads to. This strikes me as less than entirely meaningful, since there are plenty of ways to make large amounts money that are open to all graduates. It also strikes me as a little sad that apparently many members of a student forum place no value on studying something that interests them.

    PRSOM, unfortunately.

    80% of graduate employers don’t have specific subject requirements for their graduate roles, according to CBI/Pearson Education and Skills Survey 2012. The graduate market is more open to science graduates, having learned skills that are specific to industries that need those skills, and a perception (right or wrong) of the sciences developing skills and models that are objective and therefore better than those developed in the humanities, as well as sciences being reserved for those of high intellect - it can be a great choice. Though, given what is a wide graduate market for those without specific skill sets, one should very much consider both studying something that is invigorating (instead of just "rigorous", which is the way by which Tsr seems most keen to judge a degree's value besides graduate prospects) and promotes a lot of vicarious experience, a mode of learning that probably the majority of this site seems to neglect to think about.

    "A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. The man who never reads lives only one." - George R.R. Martin. The quote here rings true of what I think university is really about. Finding oneself through a subject and being totally immersed in it's life and the lives of those who have contributed to it, whether through history, theology or english literature.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
    Useful resources
    Uni match

    Applying to uni?

    Our tool will help you find the perfect course

    Articles:

    Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

    Quick link:

    Educational debate unanswered threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.