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    [QUOTE=Cholesta;63265377]

    Cholesta,

    Have you put in your LSE accommodation application form yet?
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    [QUOTE=thepgsboy2016;63265441]
    (Original post by Cholesta)

    Cholesta,

    Have you put in your LSE accommodation application form yet?
    No, it's my son. Did you apply for law? My son is worried about the social side of LSE. He's going to see it this week, even though he loved it last year. He has heard that it's cliquey and unsociable. This is all via the Internet.
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    (Original post by Cholesta)
    I completely agree. My son got 31 in the LNAT and he would agree that the questions suited him and that on a bad day he may have had a lower score. I remember reading about a law professor who did it just to see what he would get. 19 was his score. LNAT is not a good judge.
    Which uni is the young fella off to then ?
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    (Original post by NOP97)
    I wouldn't pass up going to Oxford law, if I were you - even if it's going to cost you 9,000 more. (Assuming you have the scholarship from Kings).

    If you are a UK-applicant, student loans means the cost won't harshly affect you. I'm not really sure what the process or cost is for international applicants though.

    If you can gather the money for it, going to Oxford would pay it's dividends.

    Good luck.
    Yes I am a UK applicant.

    Would I really get 27k more value by going to Oxford? I guess one factor that mitigates the "27k" is the increased cost of living in London compared to Oxford, though I'm not sure how big the difference is.
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    [QUOTE=Cholesta;63265811]
    (Original post by thepgsboy2016)
    No, it's my son. Did you apply for law? My son is worried about the social side of LSE. He's going to see it this week, even though he loved it last year. He has heard that it's cliquey and unsociable. This is all via the Internet.
    I have an unconditional offer there for Law.
    I read the things online, but I have one better, I have a lot of friends who go there, the social side is booming, in the solely undergraduate halls (Carr-Saunders & Passfield Hall) there is a great bonding and non-cliquey, just make sure he gets mucked in with societies!
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    I'M DESPERATE NOW: Is it possible to say yes to a place, then wait for the results for the IB to come out (one month after the deadline for accepting offers) and then, if you decide that your grades were good enough for a better school potentially), decline after accepting? In other words, say yes in june, but then say no in july/august? I really want to take a gap year...and try to get into better schools...
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    (Original post by Pythian)
    Which uni is the young fella off to then ?
    Not sure yet. Between LSE and Bristol😱He's worried about the lack of social life at LSE. He's going to London this week to see it again. Have you heard anything about the social life at LSE? Have you made a decision yet?
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    [QUOTE=thepgsboy2016;63266927]
    (Original post by Cholesta)

    I have an unconditional offer there for Law.
    I read the things online, but I have one better, I have a lot of friends who go there, the social side is booming, in the solely undergraduate halls (Carr-Saunders & Passfield Hall) there is a great bonding and non-cliquey, just make sure he gets mucked in with societies!
    Thanks, I'll show him this😀
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    (Original post by IDKY)
    I'M DESPERATE NOW: Is it possible to say yes to a place, then wait for the results for the IB to come out (one month after the deadline for accepting offers) and then, if you decide that your grades were good enough for a better school potentially), decline after accepting? In other words, say yes in june, but then say no in july/august? I really want to take a gap year...and try to get into better schools...
    When you accept you are basically making a contract but no university will hold you to it if you decide you don't want to be there, there would be no point. If you do better than expected and your uni of choice is in UCAS extra you can also switch from your original choice to the new one if the new uni accepts you.

    What is your current offer you will accept and which are the better unis you actually want?
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    (Original post by IDKY)
    I'M DESPERATE NOW: Is it possible to say yes to a place, then wait for the results for the IB to come out (one month after the deadline for accepting offers) and then, if you decide that your grades were good enough for a better school potentially), decline after accepting? In other words, say yes in june, but then say no in july/august? I really want to take a gap year...and try to get into better schools...
    If that is what you really want to do, just do it.

    If I have understood you correctly, what you are suggesting seems quite off to me as you'll be taking a place from another applicant with no real intention of using it.
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    I am thinking about going to a LAW Conference at UCL. But it costs 90£ would it be worth it? Good to include in personal statement?
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    (Original post by crocface)
    When you accept you are basically making a contract but no university will hold you to it if you decide you don't want to be there, there would be no point. If you do better than expected and your uni of choice is in UCAS extra you can also switch from your original choice to the new one if the new uni accepts you.

    What is your current offer you will accept and which are the better unis you actually want?
    Edinburgh and QMUL, but got rejected from UCL and King's due to LNAT, and LSE (which is crazy competitive - the only thing that was negative, however, was that I did not have any real experience with law before applying... which is something I can work on in a potential gap year. I'd really like to go to King's, and I truly believe that I can get in if I get the same grades (I wouldn't send in LNAT scores as I am technically not required to...don't ask why...)+I'd have experience and I'd show more commitment to law). But yeah, thank you very much for your response!!
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    (Original post by MsTabitha)
    If that is what you really want to do, just do it.

    If I have understood you correctly, what you are suggesting seems quite off to me as you'll be taking a place from another applicant with no real intention of using it.
    Universities know that not everyone who receives or even accepts a place somewhere will end up studying there, so they take this into account when giving offers.
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    (Original post by SuperHuman98)
    I am thinking about going to a LAW Conference at UCL. But it costs 90£ would it be worth it? Good to include in personal statement?
    Yep - if you can show that you were interested in it What's it on?
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    Yep - if you can show that you were interested in it What's it on?
    A conference about studying Law in Uni,tells you what admission tutors want to see,what its like to work in the world of law etc, law at uni
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    (Original post by SuperHuman98)
    A conference about studying Law in Uni,tells you what admission tutors want to see,what its like to work in the world of law etc, law at uni
    Ah, I thought that it was something academic. I guess that it's good to be aware of these things, even though you could undoubtedly get similar advice from the UCAS/careers adviser at your school, and find most of the specific information about the course online. I personally abhor these generic "advice" types of lectures where you're bombarded with all sorts of tips for applying to uni, so I personally wouldn't go, although it does largely depend on whether you can gain access to similar types of information through your school.
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    Ah, I thought that it was something academic. I guess that it's good to be aware of these things, even though you could undoubtedly get similar advice from the UCAS/careers adviser at your school, and find most of the specific information about the course online. I personally abhor these generic "advice" types of lectures where you're bombarded with all sorts of tips for applying to uni, so I personally wouldn't go, although it does largely depend on whether you can gain access to similar types of information through your school.
    hmm you get to speak to solicitors,barristers and law students. So I guess that would be a great thing to write about in personal statement
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    (Original post by SuperHuman98)
    hmm you get to speak to solicitors,barristers and law students. So I guess that would be a great thing to write about in personal statement
    That sounds decent, even though, from my experience shadowing a barrister, talking about the job for a couple of minutes is not quite the same as actual work experience... If you personally feel that it's worth it, then no one can stop you from going
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    That sounds decent, even though, from my experience shadowing a barrister, talking about the job for a couple of minutes is not quite the same as actual work experience... If you personally feel that it's worth it, then no one can stop you from going
    Going to combine it with work experience
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    (Original post by Flk10)
    Universities know that not everyone who receives or even accepts a place somewhere will end up studying there, so they take this into account when giving offers.
    Yes. I know they give out approximately twice as many offers as they have places to account for exactly that. However, I still think it's somewhat dishonorable to accept a place you don't actually really want.

    The OP said that what they really want to do is to take a year out & re-apply in 2017 so why then accept a place for 2016?
 
 
 
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