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    (Original post by TraineeLynsey)
    I agree with Shelly - everything you do is being judged. I arrived for an interview in the pouring rain and held the door open for an elderly gentleman who got there at the same time as me. He turned out to be the chair of governors.

    I got the job, but suspect even if everything else had happened exactly the same way, but I let that door slam in his face I never would have got the position.

    Also look up the school's aims and ethos and be prepared to show that your beliefs match their beliefs. I read every policy the school published online and was able to subtly make it clear that I'd done that when being interviewed.

    In your lesson, try to assess prior knowledge, teach something new, give them the chance to use that and then use a plenary (and mini-plenaries) to assess if they've got it.

    Get your lessons ready asap and practise them if you can. I totally ditched one of my interview lessons after testing it out at school!

    I did 3 interviews in one week and it is quite exhausting, so be as prepared as possible so that you aren't sitting there after interview 1 trying to prepare lesson materials for interview 2.
    Yeah I'm gonna do all that soon as. Time is really tight. Got rest of today, tomorrow got work and need to sort out my PPT for presentation at uni on Monday. Monday at uni but have few hours in the evening. This course really does test your management skills.

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    (Original post by qwerty_mad)
    Yeah deffo. And I need to show I can work with the TA. Another thing I got criticised for in my first interview, way back in March, was too much teacher talk. What should be the ratio?

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    For an outstanding lesson, the ratio is 20:80. 20 being how much you speak.
    For a good it should be about 30:70.
    The kids should be working more than you are.
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    I totally get this focus on hardly any teacher talk - I've been really guilty of too much of it, especially at the start of the course and whilst top sets may be focus for long periods even they will start to yawn and look out the window etc. middle and bottom sets will switch off after about 3 minutes of teacher talk sometimes.

    However I find it incredibly difficult to let pupils do 'all the work' so to speak. Surely the whole point of being a teacher is to ensure your pupils get the knowledge from you that they don't possess themselves. I know you shouldn't simply lecture them and tell them what you know but sometimes you do need to explain a concept to them and this can take 5-10 minutes. If you let pupils go off and try and find something out for themselves without that input , more often than not you'll get most of them putting their hand up saying they don't get it within a few minutes.

    There are ways around this like group work so they can all share ideas but I find a lot of pupils go off task or the weaker ones do nothing then ask the stronger ones at the end of the task what to write. Yes, as a teacher we need to ensure this doesn't happen but you can't be with every group at once.

    My main issue with how we're meant to teach at the moment is actually more to do with showing this progress within one lesson. For every pupil to make progress in a lesson you need to be a superhero; you need to have so much scaffolding and differentiation that the weaker pupils can make EXPECTED progress and not be totally stuck, you need every task to be, at the same time, challenging enough so that the more able can make expected and ABOVE expected progress. You need to ensure all tasks are engaging, that you model, that you consistently check progress, that every pupil is on task and that pupils have adequate time for written tasks but adequate time to share ideas and emotionally engage with the content first.

    50 odd minutes to ensure that's all done to a good or outstanding level.

    I get that the whole point of teaching is so pupils make progress in their education - they need to learn new skills and they need to develop the skills they already have so that when they come to do their important exams they can use those skills to get high grades. But progress comes over time. Bottom sets will take a week to learn a concept properly yet they're expected to make it in one lesson or you've failed as a teacher.

    I'm not trying to be cynical I'm just finding it all very stressful trying to juggle all these balls when I really want to be enjoying discussing things like a novel with a class but I feel I have to keep moving on to show some form of written progress every lesson.
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    (Original post by Steveluis10)
    I totally get this focus on hardly any teacher talk - I've been really guilty of too much of it, especially at the start of the course and whilst top sets may be focus for long periods even they will start to yawn and look out the window etc. middle and bottom sets will switch off after about 3 minutes of teacher talk sometimes.

    However I find it incredibly difficult to let pupils do 'all the work' so to speak. Surely the whole point of being a teacher is to ensure your pupils get the knowledge from you that they don't possess themselves. I know you shouldn't simply lecture them and tell them what you know but sometimes you do need to explain a concept to them and this can take 5-10 minutes. If you let pupils go off and try and find something out for themselves without that input , more often than not you'll get most of them putting their hand up saying they don't get it within a few minutes.

    There are ways around this like group work so they can all share ideas but I find a lot of pupils go off task or the weaker ones do nothing then ask the stronger ones at the end of the task what to write. Yes, as a teacher we need to ensure this doesn't happen but you can't be with every group at once.

    My main issue with how we're meant to teach at the moment is actually more to do with showing this progress within one lesson. For every pupil to make progress in a lesson you need to be a superhero; you need to have so much scaffolding and differentiation that the weaker pupils can make EXPECTED progress and not be totally stuck, you need every task to be, at the same time, challenging enough so that the more able can make expected and ABOVE expected progress. You need to ensure all tasks are engaging, that you model, that you consistently check progress, that every pupil is on task and that pupils have adequate time for written tasks but adequate time to share ideas and emotionally engage with the content first.

    50 odd minutes to ensure that's all done to a good or outstanding level.

    I get that the whole point of teaching is so pupils make progress in their education - they need to learn new skills and they need to develop the skills they already have so that when they come to do their important exams they can use those skills to get high grades. But progress comes over time. Bottom sets will take a week to learn a concept properly yet they're expected to make it in one lesson or you've failed as a teacher.

    I'm not trying to be cynical I'm just finding it all very stressful trying to juggle all these balls when I really want to be enjoying discussing things like a novel with a class but I feel I have to keep moving on to show some form of written progress every lesson.
    Independent tasks such as research task in which you provide the resources (which you could differentiate) and they figure out/gain knowledge from that work well in terms of reducing teacher talk when introducing a new concept. If you're worried about the weaker ones then group the pupils by giving them all a number and differentiate the resources on the table they go to. You could sit with the weakest table and guide them.

    You can discuss a novel with a class and have them share ideas without having a lengthy written task too. You could just provide them with an exit pass at the end in which they have to explain one idea they discussed/heard in detail and give them 5/10 mins to do this.
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    (Original post by Steveluis10)
    I totally get this focus on hardly any teacher talk - I've been really guilty of too much of it, especially at the start of the course and whilst top sets may be focus for long periods even they will start to yawn and look out the window etc. middle and bottom sets will switch off after about 3 minutes of teacher talk sometimes.

    However I find it incredibly difficult to let pupils do 'all the work' so to speak. Surely the whole point of being a teacher is to ensure your pupils get the knowledge from you that they don't possess themselves. I know you shouldn't simply lecture them and tell them what you know but sometimes you do need to explain a concept to them and this can take 5-10 minutes. If you let pupils go off and try and find something out for themselves without that input , more often than not you'll get most of them putting their hand up saying they don't get it within a few minutes.

    There are ways around this like group work so they can all share ideas but I find a lot of pupils go off task or the weaker ones do nothing then ask the stronger ones at the end of the task what to write. Yes, as a teacher we need to ensure this doesn't happen but you can't be with every group at once.

    My main issue with how we're meant to teach at the moment is actually more to do with showing this progress within one lesson. For every pupil to make progress in a lesson you need to be a superhero; you need to have so much scaffolding and differentiation that the weaker pupils can make EXPECTED progress and not be totally stuck, you need every task to be, at the same time, challenging enough so that the more able can make expected and ABOVE expected progress. You need to ensure all tasks are engaging, that you model, that you consistently check progress, that every pupil is on task and that pupils have adequate time for written tasks but adequate time to share ideas and emotionally engage with the content first.

    50 odd minutes to ensure that's all done to a good or outstanding level.

    I get that the whole point of teaching is so pupils make progress in their education - they need to learn new skills and they need to develop the skills they already have so that when they come to do their important exams they can use those skills to get high grades. But progress comes over time. Bottom sets will take a week to learn a concept properly yet they're expected to make it in one lesson or you've failed as a teacher.

    I'm not trying to be cynical I'm just finding it all very stressful trying to juggle all these balls when I really want to be enjoying discussing things like a novel with a class but I feel I have to keep moving on to show some form of written progress every lesson.
    I've heard Ofsted may be ditching the obsession with seeing progress within one lesson. For me this is definitely needed - sometimes you need a lesson to just build the basics of a new topic or whatever, or give them an opportunity to apply things they learnt over the previous week.

    As far as teacher talk goes, I struggle with this too. I find the best thing I can do is just do a quick 'here's your objectives, here's your success criteria' and then set them on a quick starter activity (paired discussion, trying to do something on a whiteboard, card*matching activities etc). Then I bring them back together and we discuss whatever they've just done, using their good ideas and their mistakes as the basis for the teaching.

    I also have been told that if there's a lot to explain, particularly for practical lessons, just explain the key points, let them get going and then stop them after a few minutes to share more information or ideas. Break up your talk into smaller chunks so they don't get bored.
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    I'm really shocked by the extent to which this year's trainees have bought into the whole Ofsted "Good"/"Outstanding" thing. Don't you have enough to worry about, without thinking about Ofsted criteria?
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    I agree with Stevelius, the whole 'progress in lessons' thing is a myth, however you can't guarantee that your observer is going to be au fait with all the new initiatives. Wilshaw does not want certain teaching styles favoured, however it has become so ingrained in schools that this message hasn't got through, both to management and individual inspectors.

    I just play the game. If you were being observed with Ofsted criteria then I would minimise teacher-talk etc. However, for 100% of the time I would NEVER trust the children enough to reduce teacher-talk to only 20%. I do a lot of Q&A feedback (which is very easy to differentiate) and I've noticed that learning has got better, SO much better. I find the fewer resources I use the deeper the learning is. When I was training I was all about the resources all of the time, to the detriment of the learning. I feel this is the biggest learning curve I had in my practice this year.
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    Last full week of the course! (In two days next week then back to Uni for the other 3) Can't believe how quick it's gone. It probably won't sink in until the end of the week when I'm telling my classes I'm leaving, getting gifts for my teachers and saying bye to some trainees.

    For prospective PGCE students I will write a detailed analysis of my experience in the course some time next week so you can get a flavour of what one might go through during this year!
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    What can I say...
    When I was told at the beginning of the year that this training period will pass quickly, I was not really believing it. How wrong I was - it's all ended in just a blink of an eye. Yes, there were hard moments, but even they were over very quickly. I am now happy that I will get to teach until the end of term as I'm only now feeling that I'm learning - after the final assessment without the weight of the observations on me and feeling much more relaxed but yet alert. Anyone else on SD Salaried get this feeling?....
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    (Original post by lantan)
    What can I say...
    When I was told at the beginning of the year that this training period will pass quickly, I was not really believing it. How wrong I was - it's all ended in just a blink of an eye. Yes, there were hard moments, but even they were over very quickly. I am now happy that I will get to teach until the end of term as I'm only now feeling that I'm learning - after the final assessment without the weight of the observations on me and feeling much more relaxed but yet alert. Anyone else on SD Salaried get this feeling?....
    I did the PGCE but definitely felt like I taught better towards the end when I wasn't observed and was left to my own devices a bit more. One week, all of the other members of the department went away on a residential trip, leaving me with just supply staff in the department, and I taught some of my best lessons because I felt I could experiment a bit more without being watched.
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    People, I finally got a job! I don't think I'm starting early but that's a non-issue. Gonna enjoy the summer now.

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    I can't cope!
    13 days left, things have never been so tough teaching basically 85 percent of the curriculum now, probably more with other bits!
    Yes it's gone quick but at this very point in time I want to just curl in a ball and hide :-/ I feel like I can't ever be one step of the game, I'm always two steps back and never on top of my work!
    Just tired, exhausted, ready for a break now.
    This last placement I have just wished my life away!

    I want to sleep but I'm worrying constantly about the next day!
    I must have aged 20 odd years!
    Also, school germs have attacked again, and my sinuses hurt :-/
    Fml !!
    Drowning in a sea of paperwork

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    (Original post by Frankenstein)
    I can't cope!
    13 days left, things have never been so tough teaching basically 85 percent of the curriculum now, probably more with other bits!
    Yes it's gone quick but at this very point in time I want to just curl in a ball and hide :-/ I feel like I can't ever be one step of the game, I'm always two steps back and never on top of my work!
    Just tired, exhausted, ready for a break now.
    This last placement I have just wished my life away!

    I want to sleep but I'm worrying constantly about the next day!
    I must have aged 20 odd years!
    Also, school germs have attacked again, and my sinuses hurt :-/
    Fml !!
    Drowning in a sea of paperwork

    X
    This was me three weeks ago.

    Don't worry if you don't feel well - you just have to take a day off, without feeling guilty about it.
    Hope you feel better soon, they always say that it's the darkest before the sunrise!
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    (Original post by qwerty_mad)
    People, I finally got a job! I don't think I'm starting early but that's a non-issue. Gonna enjoy the summer now.



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    Well done! So pleased for you! It's such a weight off when it happens, isn't it? I'm not starting early either, but frankly I'm happy to be getting July and August off!

    Only 2 weeks left for me after this week, and I'm not even in charge of a class. I'm really just floating cover at this point.

    I'm also at uni on one of those days and at my new school for a day and a half. It'll be over before I know it.

    When does everyone else finish?
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    (Original post by TraineeLynsey)
    Well done! So pleased for you! It's such a weight off when it happens, isn't it? I'm not starting early either, but frankly I'm happy to be getting July and August off!

    Only 2 weeks left for me after this week, and I'm not even in charge of a class. I'm really just floating cover at this point.

    I'm also at uni on one of those days and at my new school for a day and a half. It'll be over before I know it.

    When does everyone else finish?
    Thanks It sure is a huge weight off! No more applications to write.

    You're almost there. I finish today - one more meeting with my tutor and that's it. The last two weeks at school were a stroll as well, didn't teach a single lesson and just sat in my PCM's room writing an essay and doing applications.

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    I finish TODAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAYYYYYY
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    Jealous of both of you! I feel like I'm just killing time most days.
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    (Original post by TraineeLynsey)
    Jealous of both of you! I feel like I'm just killing time most days.
    I was like that two weeks ago. I had to go back to my placement school to do 'curriculum planning' but it was so boring. Felt like a complete spare part!

    Just got my final review in about an hour then I'm done

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    Officially passed my PGCE, and I celebrated by going buying a car! :lolwut:

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    (Original post by outlaw-torn)
    Officially passed my PGCE, and I celebrated by going buying a car! :lolwut:

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    Lool! That is one awesome way of celebrating. I like it

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