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    Just thought I'd say thanks for answering my previous queries. Hopefully, I'll be forced to post in the next thread
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    Hi there, if you are interested more in the chemistry/materials side, then FM is not necessary. It is much more important to have FM if you are thinking of Physics (though even here it is 'useful' rather than 'essential' providing that you are also doing Physics A Level).

    It is unusual for somone who wants to do Physics to be accepted without FM (though very far from unknown) but common for Chemists or Material scientists to be accepted without FM.

    In general, my advice would be to do FM if you can but, for Chemists/Materials, not to worry if you can't. It's unlikely, though not impossible, for us to specifcy in which Sciences we will want the two A*s you will need.

    I hope that is of some help, do feel free to come back if not.

    Thank you for your kind reply. I'm finding this help extremely useful.
    So would it be ok and would I have a good chance of getting an offer for physical natsci aiming for chemistry/materials, without FM? The main issue here is which route I apply through. I'd imagine I could do Chem/materials modules via biological but I don't want to disadvantage my application by my choice of bio vs physical.

    Would the admissions tutor consider me to have officially done FM even if I do it in one year after my AS results? I don't want my FM to be seen as any lesser due to it not being taken over the two years.

    Also how much flexibility does a student have if they wish to deviate from what they put on their ps and pick different modules? (due to a change in interest)

    Thanks for your time.
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    For Economics is there a preference towards Stats modules in FM or is it fine to choose Mechanics modules over Stats modules? Also, is there any advantage to applying after a gap year?
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    (Original post by newblood)
    Just thought I'd say thanks for answering my previous queries. Hopefully, I'll be forced to post in the next thread
    You are welcome. Good luck for your results and I hope they are good enough for you to be still thinking about Cambridge and I'll be happy to answer more questions on the next thread I do.
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    (Original post by Fishermea)
    Thank you for your kind reply. I'm finding this help extremely useful.
    So would it be ok and would I have a good chance of getting an offer for physical natsci aiming for chemistry/materials, without FM? The main issue here is which route I apply through. I'd imagine I could do Chem/materials modules via biological but I don't want to disadvantage my application by my choice of bio vs physical.

    Would the admissions tutor consider me to have officially done FM even if I do it in one year after my AS results? I don't want my FM to be seen as any lesser due to it not being taken over the two years.

    Also how much flexibility does a student have if they wish to deviate from what they put on their ps and pick different modules? (due to a change in interest)

    Thanks for your time.
    You are welcome and I am very glad it has been of some help.

    From what you have said, it seems that the best route is for you to apply through Physical rather than Biological. That said, I think you might find that biology at university is rather different (and more exciting) than at A Level. If you wan to drop Biology A2, though, then Physical is the sensible route for you to take.

    People take Maths and Further Maths in different ways for all sorts of reasons, not least because of the way the school decides to teach it. Many schools do all of A Level Maths in Year 12 and then all of FM in Year 13, while others do AS Maths and AS FM in Year 12 and then the A2s in Year 13, while still others will do AS Maths in Year 11 and then A2 Maths and AS FM in year 12 and A2 FM in Year 13. In short, as long as you say you are going to do FM then we will 'officially' regard you as doing FM and you won't be at any disadvantage.

    You have complete flexibility in choosing your options for Part IA. You have to do one of the Maths options (as a Physcal Nat Sci, you would do Mathematics) but beyond that you can choose any of the other options providing you have studied the necessary subjects at AS or A2. You don't choose your options until after you place is confirmed in August so there is plenty of time to make up your mind and for your mind to change.
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    (Original post by Galileo Galilei)
    For Economics is there a preference towards Stats modules in FM or is it fine to choose Mechanics modules over Stats modules? Also, is there any advantage to applying after a gap year?
    No, it's fine to do Mechanics modules if you prefer. The advantage you have applying after your A Levels is certainty - you know and we know what you got in A2 whereas with those aplying in Year 13 there is an element of the unknown as to how they are going to go on and do in their A2s. Provided you have done well, then applying post A Level puts you in a strong position, if you havent done as well then you are a bit weaker.
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    Hello
    I am thinking of applying for PhyNatSci in the future. I am an international student whose first language is not English. However I have done IGCSEs and am doing A levels.
    Here are my questions (for now)
    1) Do I still need to do IELTs to prove my English skill, or is English language GCSE (hopefully above B) is enough?
    2) I had 0 English skill in Year 9 when I joined the British System, and in Y11 I had decent English skill already, no problems with understanding lessons or questions. However it still is my second language and the speed at which I write essays is not as fast as native speakers which could have affected my GCSE grades. If I had weak GCSE grades (though I hope they still are A*-B) would you consider the language as an "excuse" Considering I get strong UMS in the science maths A levels?

    Thanks a lot.


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    (Original post by C0balt)
    Hello
    I am thinking of applying for PhyNatSci in the future. I am an international student whose first language is not English. However I have done IGCSEs and am doing A levels.
    Here are my questions (for now)
    1) Do I still need to do IELTs to prove my English skill, or is English language GCSE (hopefully above B) is enough?
    2) I had 0 English skill in Year 9 when I joined the British System, and in Y11 I had decent English skill already, no problems with understanding lessons or questions. However it still is my second language and the speed at which I write essays is not as fast as native speakers which could have affected my GCSE grades. If I had weak GCSE grades (though I hope they still are A*-B) would you consider the language as an "excuse" Considering I get strong UMS in the science maths A levels?

    Thanks a lot.


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    Hi there, if you have GCSE English Language then you should not have to do IELTS, though your English skills will be also assessed at interview.

    Providing you do well in your Science UMS then we will be less concerned about your GCSEs, especially given your recent introduction to English.

    Good luck.
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    Hi there, if you have GCSE English Language then you should not have to do IELTS, though your English skills will be also assessed at interview.

    Providing you do well in your Science UMS then we will be less concerned about your GCSEs, especially given your recent introduction to English.

    Good luck.
    The assessment will be how I can communicate with the interviewer and not grammar papers I hope?

    Ok thanks, I will try hard next year onwards


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    Hi, I have a question about the Extenuating Circumstances Form. I have an anxiety disorder and, as a result, am eligible for special consideration in my upcoming assessments and exams (I am an international student, from Australia, applying to Cambridge this year). I believe I should also submit the ECF following consultation with my school and therapist, but I'm concerned that the nature of my condition could potentially disadvantage me, as it could be viewed as hindering to my performance at a university level (I do not believe this will be the case)? While I don't want to be dishonest, I am unsure as to whether or not it would be better not to advise the college/admissions tutors of my condition and simply try and achieve the score that would typically meet the conditions of an offer. I hope this isn't inappropriate of me to ask, but as it is difficult for me to call the university/college and my careers counsellor is also unsure, I thought it better to ask, especially since I wouldn't want to potentially be dishonest and/or compromise the admissions process for both myself and the university if I am invited for interview. Thank you very much.
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    Hi I'm hoping to apply to do Maths at Cambridge this year, and I took Step II at the end of Yr 12. I'm expecting a 2 so I was wondering if I should mention it in PS ?

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    (Original post by C0balt)
    The assessment will be how I can communicate with the interviewer and not grammar papers I hope?

    Ok thanks, I will try hard next year onwards


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    Yes, that's right. You won;t be asked to do a grammar paper or anything like that!
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    (Original post by emilym80)
    Hi, I have a question about the Extenuating Circumstances Form. I have an anxiety disorder and, as a result, am eligible for special consideration in my upcoming assessments and exams (I am an international student, from Australia, applying to Cambridge this year). I believe I should also submit the ECF following consultation with my school and therapist, but I'm concerned that the nature of my condition could potentially disadvantage me, as it could be viewed as hindering to my performance at a university level (I do not believe this will be the case)? While I don't want to be dishonest, I am unsure as to whether or not it would be better not to advise the college/admissions tutors of my condition and simply try and achieve the score that would typically meet the conditions of an offer. I hope this isn't inappropriate of me to ask, but as it is difficult for me to call the university/college and my careers counsellor is also unsure, I thought it better to ask, especially since I wouldn't want to potentially be dishonest and/or compromise the admissions process for both myself and the university if I am invited for interview. Thank you very much.
    It is your school (or doctor) who submit the ECF, not you, but you do not need to worry about what we will think. No one is disadvantaged by submitted an ECF, it's purpose is to help us help you, both in terms of understanding the circumstances of your application and, should you be successful, in ensuring you have the best and necessary support in Cambridge when you arrive.

    It's really iimportant not to view the ECF as a potentially negative thing, most students with an ECF who recieve an offer do not get a lower offer than those without an ECF so we do not regard it as a 'backdoor route' and neither should any applicant.

    I hope this sets you mind at rest a bit about it, but please feel free to come back if you wish.
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    (Original post by arrow900)
    Hi I'm hoping to apply to do Maths at Cambridge this year, and I took Step II at the end of Yr 12. I'm expecting a 2 so I was wondering if I should mention it in PS ?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Yes, you should, but you should also mention it in the qualifications section of the UCAS form, it is after an exam that you have taken and been certified for. If you achieve a 2 and were to receive an offer, you would probably be asked to sit STEP II again to get a 1 as well as needing to sit STEP III and get a 1 in that also. if, however, you surprise yourself and get a 1 in STEP II this year, then you won't need to sit it again.
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    I'm looking at applying for engineering with physics, maths and biology for A levels.

    I know that some get offers without further maths but do you think that not doing FM will seriously disadvantage me?


    Apologies for the repetitive question but it's something that will probably decide whether I apply or not.
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    (Original post by reconn)
    I'm looking at applying for engineering with physics, maths and biology for A levels.

    I know that some get offers without further maths but do you think that not doing FM will seriously disadvantage me?


    Apologies for the repetitive question but it's something that will probably decide whether I apply or not.
    It is a tricky one to answer confidently without seeing the whole of the application but I think that it is fair to say that you will be at a disadvantage compared to those who have FM and, if possible, you should try and do some FP or Mechanics modules from the FM syllabus as it will help your preparation. How much of a disadvantage you will be at will depend on how well you do in Maths and Physics at AS. If you score well in these then that will reduce your disadvantage.

    I hope that is of some use.
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    Thank you very much, I appreciate it
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    (Original post by emilym80)
    Thank you very much, I appreciate it
    You are welcome.
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    It is a tricky one to answer confidently without seeing the whole of the application but I think that it is fair to say that you will be at a disadvantage compared to those who have FM and, if possible, you should try and do some FP or Mechanics modules from the FM syllabus as it will help your preparation. How much of a disadvantage you will be at will depend on how well you do in Maths and Physics at AS. If you score well in these then that will reduce your disadvantage.

    I hope that is of some use.

    That's definitely helpful, thank you.

    I hope I can show that my lack of FM is a result of me not being sure of what to do at the time, rather than a lack of mathematical ability.

    I've already done M1 and will be doing M2 also, I'll try and get some FP modules done now you've said it, thanks for the help!
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    (Original post by reconn)
    That's definitely helpfully, thank you.

    I hope I can show that my lack of FM is a result of me not being sure of what to do at the time, rather than a lack of mathematical ability.

    I've already done M1 and will be doing M2 also, I'll try and get some FP modules done now you've said it, thanks for the help!
    M2 and FP1 (and FP2 if possible) will certainly help. Good luck.
 
 
 
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