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    Hi guys, I have just done the 2012 paper. Which I have found by far, to be the most difficult.

    The numerical reasoning questions were my ruin on the paper. I have used the mark schemes and understood where I have gone wrong on some questions.

    Nonetheless, I can't do Q's 2, 12 and 49. The paper is here: http://www.admissionstestingservice....-section-1.pdf

    It's a recurring pattern with me. Question 2 I'm stuck due to misapplication of speed,distance time.

    Please can I have help on all three, because if I can clear the concept behind them, I will unlock a lot of progress for myself.

    Look forward to your reply,
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    (Original post by haiderraider)
    Hi guys, I have just done the 2012 paper. Which I have found by far, to be the most difficult.

    The numerical reasoning questions were my ruin on the paper. I have used the mark schemes and understood where I have gone wrong on some questions.

    Nonetheless, I can't do Q's 2, 12 and 49. The paper is here: http://www.admissionstestingservice....-section-1.pdf

    It's a recurring pattern with me. Question 2 I'm stuck due to misapplication of speed,distance time.

    Please can I have help on all three, because if I can clear the concept behind them, I will unlock a lot of progress for myself.

    Look forward to your reply,
    You can add both speeds: 32km/h
    t= x/v => t=8km / 32km/h =0,25 h= 15 min= A
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    Is there a quicker way of doing questions like Q48 2010??
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    (Original post by maximator)
    You can add both speeds: 32km/h
    t= x/v => t=8km / 32km/h =0,25 h= 15 min= A

    Thank you!!

    This might sound like me being a bit pushy! But is it possible for you to help me out on 12, 14, 43 and 49. I'm fully clueless on them.

    Regards
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    (Original post by MrBowcat)
    Is there a quicker way of doing questions like Q48 2010??
    Well, it doesnt really take long seeing as the answer is B (12:45) - probably best just to write all the journeys+waiting times out until they match up.
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    Would someone be able to explain how to do question 6 on the 2013 paper please? I don't understand what it means when it says 'the two digits that did not form part of the date'. Surely all digits form part of the date? Or am I just being stupid [COLOR=rgb(2.456934%, 3.150668%, 3.243716%)][/COLOR]
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    (Original post by 9876cd)
    Would someone be able to explain how to do question 6 on the 2013 paper please? I don't understand what it means when it says 'the two digits that did not form part of the date'. Surely all digits form part of the date? Or am I just being stupid [COLOR=rgb(2.456934%, 3.150668%, 3.243716%)][/COLOR]
    If the date is 26 05 1974, there are two digits missing:

    38

    These digits are his age.
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    Q12 on 2012 seems like it is a question possibly involving algebra. Does anyone have an idea how to approach it.

    I did 230-45 in order to get rid of all those students who did neither maths nor economics.
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    (Original post by haiderraider)
    Thank you!!

    This might sound like me being a bit pushy! But is it possible for you to help me out on 12, 14, 43 and 49. I'm fully clueless on them.

    Regards
    Q12: add math and economic components, that gives 216
    if you subtract 45 from 230= 185 (people with maths or economic component or both)
    then you calculate 216-185 that leaves you with the people having math and economic

    Q14: you have to look for similarities: it is field B
    here are some of the circles triangles and some are missing, but is the closest one to the field above

    Q43: you have to look at the biggest amount of time between sunrise-moonst and sunset-moonrise.
    As a result you only have to subtract the sunset times from the moonrise times (moonset and sunrise never overlap)
    => D Leith has the longest time

    Q49: 100W=0,075$ =>20W=0,015$

    0,4$+0,075$x=10$+0,015$x
    =>0,06$x=9,6$ x=160
    160/20=80weeks= C
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    (Original post by hoollsss)
    Does anyone know exactly how much paper we get for the essay, because there's a limit isn't there?
    You'll get 2 papers and no more than that.
    It's simply enough: You will probably fill around 1.5, if you take 5 minutes to think and plan.
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    Hi can someone help me with qn 19,30,36 and 48 for 2012?
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    (Original post by amyrah)
    Thanks! I feel so relieved, well sort of..I've still gotta sit the exam! How are you going about structuring it ?
    There's a writing task commentary on the TSA website which might help you with section 2. It says the essay will be judged on the quality of what you write and how you use what you know.

    In terms of structure, I haven't thought about it exactly but if you look at the questions then it's clear that they want you to give a definite stance and carry it through most of your essay. Put forward counter-arguments but I'd make sure that you don't appear to switch opinion or sit on the fence.

    I'm probably going to practice the essay tonight or tomorrow now that I've done all the MCQ apart from 2007. Then I might have more of an idea on my structure. The MCQ is comparatively far more important then the essay section. If they wanted to truly test your essay skills and knowledge then they would ask for some work to be submitted to get a fairer reflection. All they are doing is testing how you think whilst making sure you can write coherently and cohesively. No doubt it's important to write a half decent essay but it's not going to make a huge difference either way.

    http://www.admissionstestingservice....commentary.pdf
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    (Original post by Askaud)
    There's a writing task commentary on the TSA website which might help you with section 2. It says the essay will be judged on the quality of what you write and how you use what you know.

    In terms of structure, I haven't thought about it exactly but if you look at the questions then it's clear that they want you to give a definite stance and carry it through most of your essay. Put forward counter-arguments but I'd make sure that you don't appear to switch opinion or sit on the fence.

    I'm probably going to practice the essay tonight or tomorrow now that I've done all the MCQ apart from 2007. Then I might have more of an idea on my structure. The MCQ is comparatively far more important then the essay section. If they wanted to truly test your essay skills and knowledge then they would ask for some work to be submitted to get a fairer reflection. All they are doing is testing how you think whilst making sure you can write coherently and cohesively. No doubt it's important to write a half decent essay but it's not going to make a huge difference either way.

    http://www.admissionstestingservice....commentary.pdf
    Was there ever consensus over the answers for the 2007 paper?
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    (Original post by PaulKrugman)
    Was there ever consensus over the answers for the 2007 paper?
    It was discussed by a couple of people around page 11/12/13 and there was agreement on a lot of the answers. I lost interest to track their discussions so I'm not sure if there was ever full agreement.
    I also can't find the answers anywhere in the internet world
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    (Original post by Askaud)
    It was discussed by a couple of people around page 11/12/13 and there was agreement on a lot of the answers. I lost interest to track their discussions so I'm not sure if there was ever full agreement.
    I also can't find the answers anywhere in the internet world

    I was involved in the discussions. We haven't actually agreed on any solutions for around 5 questions. The others were pretty obvious.
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    just done an essay, don't hate, did it in 25 minutes

    some constructive feedback would be grand

    I'll just paste it here:
    Question was from 2009 "What changes in society will follow from increased life expectancy?"

    Spoiler:
    Show
    If the UK were to face an increased life expectancy, this would have many effects.

    If more people were living to a greater age, the total population would increase. This would lead to more demand for goods and services, boosting GDP. However, as many elderly are retired, and thus economically inactive, they may have negative impacts. If the amount of elderly people in work did not increase, the dependency ratio of the country would increase, leading to overemployment. This may lead to an increase in immigration as foreign workers are brought in to fill the skills gap, changing the demographic makeup of the country, and possibly leading to social segregation. However, increased life expectancy suggests improved healthcare, meaning many people may be able to choose to retire later, not drawing their state pensions until they are unable to work.

    The increased proportion of elderly people, who typically vote more than the young, would lead to politicians skewing policies towards the elderly, perhaps disenfranchising the younger generations, leading to policy myopia (as the elderly do not tend to be as interested in the long run as the young and middle aged).

    The population increase that would be caused by increased life expectancy may lead to resources becoming scarcer, as the pressure to produce more food and water increases. This may accelerate deforestation, as swathes of land are cleared to create new farm land, possibly leading to more severe climate in the long run. In the short run, the price of food may increase, impacting the young, who have not had time to accumulate wealth, disproportionately, possibly creating a social divide between the wealthy old and the poor young.

    However, increased life expectancy is likely to have some benefits to society. Many elderly are more willing to volunteer in their local community, and act as an invaluable resource in the form of free childcare, benefitting many working families by cutting costs. On the other hand, this extra labour may drive down wages across the economy, making everyone worse off. This may depend on how much time the people who are living longer choose to devote to leisure time, a very individual question.

    To conclude, an increase in life expectancy would likely strain the economy and the environment, however many would feel benefit from older people being able to remain economically active for longer. If people know they will live longer lives, they may choose to work fewer hours per week, as they will still work more in the long run. This may mean that everyone benefits, as more people can work less to produce enough goods and services to satisfy everyone’s demands.
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    What methods do people approach the TSA with?
    I find it really hard to complete all the questions in the time limit.

    Do you all do it chronologically?
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    (Original post by flexee)
    What methods do people approach the TSA with?
    I find it really hard to complete all the questions in the time limit.

    Do you all do it chronologically?
    I do all the reading ones first, then go back through and do all the maths and numerical based ones, not sure how much it speeds me up though.
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    (Original post by samthemiller)
    just done an essay, don't hate, did it in 25 minutes

    some constructive feedback would be grand

    I'll just paste it here:
    Question was from 2009 "What changes in society will follow from increased life expectancy?"

    Spoiler:
    Show
    If the UK were to face an increased life expectancy, this would have many effects.

    If more people were living to a greater age, the total population would increase. This would lead to more demand for goods and services, boosting GDP. However, as many elderly are retired, and thus economically inactive, they may have negative impacts. If the amount of elderly people in work did not increase, the dependency ratio of the country would increase, leading to overemployment. This may lead to an increase in immigration as foreign workers are brought in to fill the skills gap, changing the demographic makeup of the country, and possibly leading to social segregation. However, increased life expectancy suggests improved healthcare, meaning many people may be able to choose to retire later, not drawing their state pensions until they are unable to work.

    The increased proportion of elderly people, who typically vote more than the young, would lead to politicians skewing policies towards the elderly, perhaps disenfranchising the younger generations, leading to policy myopia (as the elderly do not tend to be as interested in the long run as the young and middle aged).

    The population increase that would be caused by increased life expectancy may lead to resources becoming scarcer, as the pressure to produce more food and water increases. This may accelerate deforestation, as swathes of land are cleared to create new farm land, possibly leading to more severe climate in the long run. In the short run, the price of food may increase, impacting the young, who have not had time to accumulate wealth, disproportionately, possibly creating a social divide between the wealthy old and the poor young.

    However, increased life expectancy is likely to have some benefits to society. Many elderly are more willing to volunteer in their local community, and act as an invaluable resource in the form of free childcare, benefitting many working families by cutting costs. On the other hand, this extra labour may drive down wages across the economy, making everyone worse off. This may depend on how much time the people who are living longer choose to devote to leisure time, a very individual question.

    To conclude, an increase in life expectancy would likely strain the economy and the environment, however many would feel benefit from older people being able to remain economically active for longer. If people know they will live longer lives, they may choose to work fewer hours per week, as they will still work more in the long run. This may mean that everyone benefits, as more people can work less to produce enough goods and services to satisfy everyone’s demands.
    I though it was quite a good, well balanced answer. However, you should really try and define key terms at the start - also, I feel like you may have jumped the gun as increased life expectancy does not always mean an increased population - there are other factors.
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    (Original post by Teddysmith123)
    Hi can someone help me with qn 19,30,36 and 48 for 2012?
    30)

    1/16 * 12,000 = 750ml
    1/25 * 12,000 = 480ml

    750ml + 480ml = 1230ml which is B.
 
 
 
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