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    (Original post by mynameiskeith)
    Anyone else got RS and this English lit exam on the same day? -.-
    Me! *cries*
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    (Original post by AnimeFreak101)
    Wasn't that in Northern Ireland or something? I'm kinda starting to get confused, I'll just check the website.
    But if Carlson does come up what kind of questions are they like to ask & which bit

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    I'm just using the AQA website as a guide and the past paper questions my teachers given me.

    Perhaps his detached and unemotional attitude and the ending of the book where he says 'Now what the hell ya suppose is eatin' them two guys?' after George has shot Lennie.
    They could ask about isolation and how Carlson's behaviour is indicative of the stereotypical attitude in that time.
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    (Original post by Zahra kosser)
    so for the extract question they could potentially use the scene where he is introduced or the scene where he fights with lennie

    for the second context question they could ask about isolation or maybe violence but more likely to be isolation

    Yes that is actually quite a big possibility as Curley hasnt been mentioned in neither part a or b at all so far. Okay then of to revising some Curley quotes...
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    Any tips for the extract because I struggle in OMAM but get 20-21/30 in The Crucible, so does anyone have any tips?
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    For question A and B in the of mice and men question just he one long answer rather than an answer for A and one for B?

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    Wish i did OMAM cos TKAM is next level hard
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    (Original post by Trihawk7)
    For question A and B in the of mice and men question just he one long answer rather than an answer for A and one for B?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    for OMAM you will have 45 minutes to answer part a) and part b). you will get a mark out of 30 for answering both questions: not a mark out of 15 for each but a whole mark out of 30. however you do not answer them both as one long answer but 2 different answers. most of the time they do link, for an example, when part a) was an extract about Curley's wife, part b) was about attitudes to women but still answer them as separate. Make sure you use quotations from the extract for part a). however for higher marks do not use, if possible, quotations from the extract for part b) as you will get marks for showing that you understand the novel as a whole.

    hope that helps
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    (Original post by Zahra kosser)
    for OMAM you will have 45 minutes to answer part a) and part b). you will get a mark out of 30 for answering both questions: not a mark out of 15 for each but a whole mark out of 30. however you do not answer them both as one long answer but 2 different answers. most of the time they do link, for an example, when part a) was an extract about Curley's wife, part b) was about attitudes to women but still answer them as separate. Make sure you use quotations from the extract for part a). however for higher marks do not use, if possible, quotations from the extract for part b) as you will get marks for showing that you understand the novel as a whole.

    hope that helps
    I was watching a video from Dominic Salles and recently from Mr Bruff and they said that you can actually answer them as one long answer rather than splitting it. Idk what to do. How long is your part A usually compared to B? Thanks for the advice as well

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    (Original post by Trihawk7)
    I was watching a video from Dominic Salles and recently from Mr Bruff and they said that you can actually answer them as one long answer rather than splitting it. Idk what to do. How long is your part A usually compared to B? Thanks for the advice as well

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I done a Part A answer today and it was: intro, 3 paragraphs, conclusion. Took me 22mins 😃
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    (Original post by Trihawk7)
    I was watching a video from Dominic Salles and recently from Mr Bruff and they said that you can actually answer them as one long answer rather than splitting it. Idk what to do. How long is your part A usually compared to B? Thanks for the advice as well

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    oh ok fair enough lol, I've just always been told to answer as separate. the thing is if your looking to get really high marks in this exam you have to really analyse like in loads of detail and you can achieve this by analysing 2/3 points or quotes for part a) and 2/3 for part b). therefore, my final advice would be to not concentrate on length but really going into detail and analysing : quality not quantity! BUT usually my part a) are 2.5 pages long and part b) is 3 pages.
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    I normally do part a) and part b) as one linking them together through my quotations I selected, normally 3 or 4 points. Remember to write a lot about a little, this is the examiners advice I heard and its true. I read on a examiner report that it is suggested to do them as one whole rather than part a and b separately but just make sure you do it in 45mins because you don't want to leave the other part with 15 mins to spare. Good luck!!
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    For section A of the Unit 1 exam (in my case, "An Inspector Calls"), do you not need social, historical, cultural info in your answer?
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    (Original post by simply_a_ Δ)
    For section A of the Unit 1 exam (in my case, "An Inspector Calls"), do you not need social, historical, cultural info in your answer?
    Depends on question really, but social is always really good to add, historical in terms of the dramatic irony used by priestely, ie te titanic sinking and the war. But not too sure about cultural
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    (Original post by Anks1329)
    Yes that is actually quite a big possibility as Curley hasnt been mentioned in neither part a or b at all so far. Okay then of to revising some Curley quotes...
    Has anyone got any final predictions? For OMAM Im thinking something to do with Curley and linked to violence and then for AIC possibly Mr Birling since i think he's one of the only ones that hasn't come up..at least i think so, but surely the exam boards wouldn't make it that easy?
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    how should I revise The Crucible?
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    Which points do you mention about Mrs B?
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    When writing an audience/ reader's response, do we need to write about the reader of the time AND how the modern day reader reacts or just have a general reader's response?
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    Could anyone mark this essay on An Inspector Calls for me or give me some feedback? I know it's long and horrible please don't hate me

    Q) How does Priestley present conflict between the generations?

    A) Eric and Sheila both represent the younger generation while their parents represent the older generation. Through creating conflicts between the views and actions of these characters, Priestley explores the key theme of generational divide.
    Mr and Mrs Birling seem to believe tat as the older generation, their views are superior to their children's. At the start of the play, they cosset Eric and Sheila; for example, Mr Birling addresses his long winded speech to "you youngsters" and reprimands Sheila, saying "Are you listening, Sheila?" to which she replies "I'm sorry Daddy. Actually I was listening." The language used by Mr Birling gives a very patronising tone which suggests that he thinks that as an older character he has a right to talk down to Sheila. Moreover, Sheila's apology shows that she is submissive and obedient; this could show that te older generation are too controlling and overbearing. Furthermore, Sheila calls her father 'daddy' despite being in her twenties, showing that the way the older generation coddle their children is unnecessary and ridiculous, as it seems foolish to the audience to hear a grown woman use such a childish term. Finally, the way Sheila protests her innocence by saying "actually I was listening" show that she is not entirely subservient. It contrasts to the image preiously presented and shows that she is on some level able to stand up and assert herself. Through this Priestley begins to indicate that the younger generation are not as passive as they initially seem. They can and should challenge their parents.

    Priestley expands on this ida by providing a contrast between Mir Birlings political views and his children;s. Mr B is very much a traditional Capitalist who is driven by money and "higher prices." In comparison his children take a more Socialist standing. Forexample, Eric challenges him by "(bursting out) Well I think it's a dam' shame...why shouldn't they try for higher wages?" The stage directions show that Eric feels passionate about this issue as he cannot contain his comment. The word 'bursting' also however connotes an image of a balloon bursting and deflating. This could reflect the way Mr Birling's -and the older generation's- views are under attack and threatened by the young. Morever, Eric literally questions why the workers shouldn't be allowed to strike. This has an effect on the audience because it prompts them to consider their own answer. Through presenting the more Socialist view through Eric - who the audience already recognise to be more perceptive and progressive charactr than Birling - Priestley is subtly pushing the audience to take the view of the younger generation and to reject the outdated Capitalist ideals.

    Despite originally presenting them as obedient and controlled by their parents, as the play progresses Eric and Sheila reveal themselves to be strong willed and far more socially aware than their parents. This leads them to respond to te Inspector very differently. Theey are much more ready to accept their responsibility. In the final act, Birling protests that "there's every excuse for what both your mother and i did" while Sheila readily admits "I behaved badly. I know I did. I'm ashamed of it." Mr Birling himself seems to encourge the conflict between the generations by setting himself and Mrs Birling apart from the others, showing that he still believes their age offers them a natural and unquestionable superiority. However the audience is able to recognise that he is the one in the wrong. Both he and Mrs B have done soemthing wrong and their stubborn refusal to admit this makes the audience see they are stuck in their ways. Therefore Priestley shows that the odler generation can find it much harder to change their views. He is also saying that they are unable to admit they can make mistakes and behave badly. By associating this inability to accept responsibility with the old priestley shows that it is outdated and should be replaced by a new way of thinking. Moreover this idea is encouraged by Sheila.She speaks in short sentences so the audience focuses more on her words than they do on Birlings lengthy prating. The emotive language of'ashamed' encourages the audience to forgive her,because it shows her character is more mature and can admit her own flaws - a quality the apparently mature Mr Birling doesn't seem to have. Alternatively, Priestly could be insinuating that the reason Sheila 'behaved badly' in the first place was due to her parents who have not raised her with the morals and values Priestly considers important - kindness and compassion. Rather she has found these values on her own. Therefore Priestley shows it is possible to break free of a cycle and move away from your parents views and form opinions independent of their influence - and he encourages this.
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    (Original post by simply_a_ Δ)
    When writing an audience/ reader's response, do we need to write about the reader of the time AND how the modern day reader reacts or just have a general reader's response?
    Do both. That's an impressive way to tackle both the interpretation and context bullet points in the mark scheme. So, for example:

    While Steinbeck's representation of George's paternity to Lennie could be argued to accentuate the strength of their relationship, through a more contextual lens, it becomes increasingly apparent that their father-son-like relationship has been used by Steinbeck for the ultimate purpose of capturing and reinforcing the need for the protection of the disabled in 1930's America, where only the fittest amid the populace can survive.

    The emboldened bits are the best bits. It shows your evaluating your interpretations based on context. Evaluation is what the best of the best will achieve.

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    Does anyone have any good quotes for Carlson? I'm terrified that he'll come up!
 
 
 
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