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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Pretty good list, but they've averaged wages across all seniority levels so not the most accurate for uni goers. Thanks for the link

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    Graduate salary is less important than what you can hope to achieve at senior levels.
    That's not the point you were making but probably worth considering on this thread.
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    (Original post by BizzStrut)
    Graduate salary is less important than what you can hope to achieve at senior levels.
    That's not the point you were making but probably worth considering on this thread.
    Very true. I feel a lot of people get caught up in early career pay, without thinking of what their potential upside is in their peak earning years. Although, most on here aren't super concerned with upside which is also fine.
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    (Original post by lllllllllll)
    hmmmmm great post

    Either

    Degree: Computer Science + PhD in Artificial Intelligence
    Jobs/Careers of interest: Research scientist
    Graduate salary expected: don't mind

    Or

    Degree: Computer Science
    Jobs/Careers of interest: Cryptography
    Graduate salary expected: dont mind
    Good luck with this. Particularly with a PhD in AI, you'll be swimming in fantastic job offers.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Very true. I feel a lot of people get caught up in early career pay, without thinking of what their potential upside is in their peak earning years. Although, most on here aren't super concerned with upside which is also fine.
    I think money/'great benefits' SHOULDN'T even be the main reason you apply for that job!

    What you gonna do with that 30,000K if banking/engineering/law/etc isn't even something you enjoy doing, not to mention having the passion for that subject?

    + the fact that you do it everyday 9-5 and you get a few weeks per YEAR to enjoy an expensive holiday to Miami that you bought by working the whole year.

    Now for people disagreeing, I don't mean to say that you got an undergraduate degree to live on a minimum wage - no, but a decent, average wage should do, as a first proper job you get.
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    (Original post by y0_3mma)
    I think money/'great benefits' SHOULDN'T even be the main reason you apply for that job!

    What you gonna do with that 30,000K if banking/engineering/law/etc isn't even something you enjoy doing, not to mention having the passion for that subject?

    + the fact that you do it everyday 9-5 and you get a few weeks per YEAR to enjoy an expensive holiday to Miami that you bought by working the whole year.

    Now for people disagreeing, I don't mean to say that you got an undergraduate degree to live on a minimum wage - no, but a decent, average wage should do, as a first proper job you get.
    This is assuming you can't enjoy any of those jobs..

    It's entirely possible (and in most cases the norm) for successful people in whatever career to be very immersed in what they do, it doesn't feel like work to them because they get a thrill from the job.

    Passion and pay aren't mutually exclusive in essence..

    Average wage is great and all (if you want to be average) but I won't personally be aiming for 'average' careers
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    Degree: Law
    Career: Corporate Law (US Firm)
    Salary: £50k rising to £105k once qualified aged 25

    Already secured


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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    I'm really interested in seeing whether TSR users are actually in touch with what opportunities there are career wise for their degrees and whether they have accurate expectations of entry level pay. My experience on here has been that people assume that say, any STEM degree will lead to 'high pay' but they never really qualify this statement nor do they express which jobs they are talking about.So without further ado:Degree:Jobs/Careers of Interest:Graduate Salary Expected:

    Degree: Business Mathematics and Statistics
    Jobs/careers of interest: Accounting/audit/assurance, at a big4 firm hopefully or at a ftse100 company
    Salary: £28000 or something like that
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    (Original post by faston2k16)
    Degree: Business Mathematics and Statistics
    Jobs/careers of interest: Accounting/audit/assurance, at a big4 firm hopefully or at a ftse100 company
    Salary: £28000 or something like that
    LSE?
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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    LSE?
    yeah
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    (Original post by faston2k16)
    yeah
    cool
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Average wage is great and all (if you want to be average) but I won't personally be aiming for 'average' careers
    What's an "average career"?
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    (Original post by ahpadt)
    What's an "average career"?
    Less competition to get in, less upside available, less internal competition, more stable job with 'normal' hours, an eventual responsibility plateau etc..

    For example, in a standard corporation, most will plateau around their 30s with the exceptional workers rising to executive levels by their mid 40s earliest. In comparison to consulting/law/ib, where by mid thirties you've accelerated through the ranks.

    It's hard to define, but average is where you have some growth opportunities but on the whole it's not as steep as say high finance/top tech/consulting/tech entrepreneurship...

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    Medicine

    Want to be a doctor with a career as clinician scientist too.

    Just want to do what I love and get a pay cheque at the end of the day. Worrying about money as your main career aim is for losers. Think about how you will contribute to society!

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    (Original post by Asklepios)
    Medicine

    Want to be a doctor with a career as clinician scientist too.

    Just want to do what I love and get a pay cheque at the end of the day. Worrying about money as your main career aim is for losers. Think about how you will contribute to society!

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    Says the person with a £200k apartment..

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    For example, in a standard corporation, most will plateau around their 30s with the exceptional workers rising to executive levels by their mid 40s earliest. In comparison to consulting/law/ib, where by mid thirties you've accelerated through the ranks.Posted from TSR Mobile
    That's not been my experience of seeing what's happened in major consulting and law firms. Far too many stagnate in their careers and very few are actually "accelerated" through the ranks. Many get stuck in fairly lower ranks and only the exceptional performers are able to truly accelerate. Even some of the exceptional ones don't manage it.

    In contrast I've seen a fair amount of people in "average" jobs excel and gain more responsibility much earlier than the more structured career progression paths that comes from professional services. Their salary might be "average" in comparison, but if anything I think it's easier to progress outside of a structured career path than it is to do so in one.


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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Says the person with a £200k apartment..

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    *250 actually

    I'm not saying having money is bad, but being so money-minded that making money is your primary career intention is just sad.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    That's not been my experience of seeing what's happened in major consulting and law firms. Far too many stagnate in their careers and very few are actually "accelerated" through the ranks. Many get stuck in fairly lower ranks and only the exceptional performers are able to truly accelerate. Even some of the exceptional ones don't manage it.

    In contrast I've seen a fair amount of people in "average" jobs excel and gain more responsibility much earlier than the more structured career progression paths that comes from professional services. Their salary might be "average" in comparison, but if anything I think it's easier to progress outside of a structured career path than it is to do so in one.


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    Indeed, exceptional people at both do end up doing well for themselves. However, I'd say that even if you 'stall out' of a consulting or law firm, you'd still have more varied exit options into a higher job rank (or a more lucrative/stimulating career route, or similar level at a similar firm) than you otherwise would have had you gone straight into industry. The business model of these organisations favours high turnover, and the majority of those going into these places know that scaling the career ladder is the least likely outcome for them.

    For me, I would prefer the environment of the careers I listed above. They're a better fit for who I am, and what my goals are than a more 'average' (which I still think is very subjective and hard to define) career. I'm the competitive, uber ambitious type willing to work very hard to get to where I want to be - being surrounded by similar individuals is a win-win for me as I'd be able to relate with them more and they'd be great contacts to keep in touch with as the chances of at least a couple of them landing at the 'top' are quite high.

    That's my take at least. Different careers are a good fit for different people and different people value different ideals for their career.
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    (Original post by Asklepios)
    *250 actually

    I'm not saying having money is bad, but being so money-minded that making money is your primary career intention is just sad.
    Of course, most people who prioritise money only never actually make much money, it's a balancing act.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    However, I'd say that even if you 'stall out' of a consulting or law firm, you'd still have more varied exit options into a higher job rank (or a more lucrative/stimulating career route, or similar level at a similar firm) than you otherwise would have had you gone straight into industry. The business model of these organisations favours high turnover, and the majority of those going into these places know that scaling the career ladder is the least likely outcome for them.
    I think you might be surprised how many junior people in those professions struggle to transfer into other industries - and in part that is down to how many leave early on. I agree they do provide a lot of transferable skills and knowledge, but there are some challenges, mainly the significant differences in culture, motivators and salary.

    I'm not surprised by what motivates you at all. I guess I just have a very different view on what average is to you.




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    (Original post by J-SP)
    I think you might be surprised how many junior people in those professions struggle to transfer into other industries - and in part that is down to how many leave early on. I agree they do provide a lot of transferable skills and knowledge, but there are some challenges, mainly the significant differences in culture, motivators and salary.

    I'm not surprised by what motivates you at all. I guess I just have a very different view on what average is to you.




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    Very true. As always, really appreciate your realism J-SP

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