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What's the essential piece of advice you'd give to someone starting their A-levels? Watch

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    Start your revision from the first day you get there and never miss a lesson because you'll miss out on a lot!
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    Work hard throughout the year and start studying early. Try your hardest to not lose interest in your subjects because it is so much easier studying subjects you love!
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    Don't worry about it being to hard. It's just another step up as is the every next thing you do. Just keep on top of your stuff and then you won't be stressing last minute as much.
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    Even if you think you have revised everything keep going. Just go over it again and again in every way possible. Don't give up it will all be worth it!
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    Start early, don't just say that you will, actually do it.

    DO IT
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    Whenever you feel like lazing around and not doing any work, just remember the end goal that you have set yourself for the year. Focus on that, along with the terror of a failure on results day. That'll set ya straight.
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    Actually study in your free periods; revise with the course specification; past papers are precious, try and only do them when you feel you have covered the specification enough (but don't leave them too late); hope for the best but always plan for the worst.
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    Depends hugely on your subjects, your study habbits and simply what works for you. As far as maths and science subjects go, I would recommend doing a significant amount of independent study as this is the best way to fill the gaps in your knowledge. Expect to have a weak social life for the next two years and try not to put off the idea of spending hours tackling problems you find difficult, it seriously pays off in the end.
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    Depends hugely on your subjects, your study habits and simply what works for you. As far as maths and science subjects go, I would recommend doing a significant amount of independent study as this is the best way to fill the gaps in your knowledge. Expect to have a weak social life for the next two years and try not to put off the idea of spending hours tackling problems you find difficult, it seriously pays off in the end.
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    Get focused from the first day and make use of your free periods. Once it gets to December and you're behind it will be a lot of work to catch up.

    If you're doing a language, make sure you do extra for example, (watch videos, movies, listen to the radio in that language, even put on subtitles in that language)
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    Stay organised. Catch-up is do-able in certain subjects, but a pain in the butt, and not something you want to be dealing with. Do your revision intelligently - don't think you can just get away with revising the content in the books. Do the extra reading, take the extra time to look something up.

    DO NOT be afraid to go to your head of sixth form/college and tell them you're unhappy in your subjects. I got a month into doing psychology, decided I hated it, and told my head of year - now, I just got my 200/200 UMS in politics, despite joining a month late. It's not like being in GCSE's - you have a choice, and you need to take control if you're unhappy.

    Most importantly, remember to enjoy it! You're not having to take compulsory languages, maths, or english anymore - these are all your choices. Even though it's tough at times, it's worth it in the end, and it's FAR better than GCSE's ever were.
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    If you're taking Maths or Further Maths, please actually do your work consistently throughout the year. You won't be able to cram Maths if you don't understand anything...
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    Cherish what little time you have left before you start your A-Levels as you will want to run for the hills after the amount of work you get in your first year of A-Levels.
    Also don't pick biology if it's on the AQA exam board as they've just changed literally everything so the questions hardly involve any biology knowledge and half of it is not on the specification and the mark scheme is full of stupid answers it's like a 5-year old has written it.
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    Never give up even if the work load is too much!
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    Contrary to popular belief, you can waste your free periods doing nothing, not spend hours revising every day and basically cramming and STILL get the top grades of A*s and As.

    As long as you understand what you're talking about and your exam technique is A1, you can get better grades than people who spend their whole life revising. Have your social life, make sure the teachers don't hate you so they give you support, and you don't have to do these 50 hour revision weeks.
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    (Original post by vca)
    Contrary to popular belief, you can waste your free periods doing nothing, not spend hours revising every day and basically cramming and STILL get the top grades of A*s and As.

    As long as you understand what you're talking about and your exam technique is A1, you can get better grades than people who spend their whole life revising. Have your social life, make sure the teachers don't hate you so they give you support, and you don't have to do these 50 hour revision weeks.
    I don't believe you and don't recommend this sort of thinking. It's not self-confidence... it's arrogance! Just because it might have worked for you, does not mean it works for anyone else. You must be lucky and very intelligent to do that; an anomaly. I am a very smart student myself, did 4 AS but ended up with a B in further maths. With a C in fp1 and C in s2! I totally understood the content of the course, and the previous exam styles. However what I believe screwed me over, was not doing enough questions.

    Therefore my advice would be... do your homework, all of it! Also, do as many past paper questions as possible. Revise as much as you can. These years count!
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    *Make the most of your study (free) blocks. It will help to balance your workload.

    *Get a friend to test your knowledge - I used to give my revision notes to my girlfriend, who would then quiz me on the material.

    *Make notes, and stick them up around your room. That way you'll be able to retain the information for a longer period. Also, explore an effective note taking strategy like Cornell Notes. It saves a lot of time in the long run.

    *Review your class notes every night

    *Go to bed early, and wake up early.
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    (Original post by pereira325)
    I don't believe you and don't recommend this sort of thinking. It's not self-confidence... it's arrogance! Just because it might have worked for you, does not mean it works for anyone else. You must be lucky and very intelligent to do that; an anomaly. I am a very smart student myself, did 4 AS but ended up with a B in further maths. With a C in fp1 and C in s2! I totally understood the content of the course, and the previous exam styles. However what I believe screwed me over, was not doing enough questions.

    Therefore my advice would be... do your homework, all of it! Also, do as many past paper questions as possible. Revise as much as you can. These years count!
    It works for some but definitely not for all, I won't disagree with that.
    I did however do every piece of homework and took all mocks and my subjects seriously, as well as doing all the past papers when they were set for homework and for revision. I have to say I did find a style of revision which was effective for me, and that's what's important.
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    * Take subjects you enjoy. If you don't like them, you won't be able to cope with them.
    * Build up good relationships with teachers if you can. This way they are more likely to be reasonable with you when you miss work etc., and will often be there to give you advice on anything at all. I might just have been a teachers' pet, but by mid year 13 most of my teachers could tell if I was struggling without me even telling them, and were lenient with me when I needed it because I had earned their trust.
    * Try to keep on top of work throughout the year. You'll be glad of it when it comes to exam season, and all you need to do is revise rather than re-learn.
    * Don't be cliquey. Being in a clique is great until the clique falls apart and everyone else hates you because your group were such knobheads. Be tolerant of everyone at the very least, and it'll pay off. Try to make friends with people in your classes even if you aren't friends with them in your free time - it'll make your lessons more tolerable and you can help each other with catching up work.
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    Working smart is more important than working hard.
 
 
 
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