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    (Original post by Athematica)
    PRSOM, unfortunately.

    80% of graduate employers don’t have specific subject requirements for their graduate roles, according to CBI/Pearson Education and Skills Survey 2012. Though the graduate market is 'more' open to science graduates, having learned skills that are specific to industries that need those skills, and a perception (right or wrong) of the sciences developing skills and models that are objective and therefore better than those developed in the humanities, as well as sciences being reserved for those of high intellect, it can be a great choice. Though, given what is a wide graduate market for those without specific skill sets, one should very much consider both studying something that is invigorating (instead of just "rigorous", which is the way by which Tsr seems most keen to judge a degree's value besides graduate prospects) and promotes a lot of vicarious experience, a mode of learning that probably the majority of this site seems to neglect to think about.

    "A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. The man who never reads lives only one." - George R.R. Martin. The quote here rings true of what I think university is really about. Finding oneself through a subject and being totally immersed in it's life and the lives of those who have contributed to it, whether through history, theology or english literature.
    +1 people on this site need a reality check sometimes.

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    PPE
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    Medicine
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    (Original post by CJKAllstar)
    Awkward moment when you want to do PPE/Politics and Econ...

    Tbf though it's because I have a serious interest in politics and econ above any other subject, and though I'm not aiming to be an MP, I do want to work in politics.

    I'd agree though that people who take these subjects thinking it's a blagger's degree to power are probably overestimating just how useful PPE is or politics for that matter, it's one of the few courses that as the quality and prestige of your uni decreases, it becomes a lot more soft and probably a lot more useless, which is why I sorta have to get into a top uni...

    With that in mind I'd still say finance. In my experience, people who do finance or accounting of some sort think it's a one way ticket to become a successful entrepreneur, banker, accountant or whatever. In my school it's the single most popular choice for people without any actual serious interest in a subject who don't really know what they want to do. Realistically maths is a lot more useful for banking and accountancy, and entrepreneurship or management of some sort does not in themselves require a degree. Finance has its uses but from personal experience, it's highly overrated.
    The idea that everyone who does PPE is power mad and think they will be an MP by the age of 25 is pretty daft. Most people who take the course end up working in things like banking, finance, the City in various ways, also mainstream business jobs and lots of other things besides.
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    Law ~


    Think about it.. You get to dress up like an idiot and say stupid things.
    Does one need a degree to do that~ ?
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    (Original post by Athematica)
    You wrongly seem to see a degree as a means by which to guarantee work and that a degree should only be measured by such metric. I think that is Portella's contention with the thread's attitude.
    But that's not what I said at all. Obviously there's more than 1 factor. Plus "guaranteeing work" is an unfair standard since so few degrees offer that. Medicine and Nursing are the only ones I can think of right now though there may be more. But I stand by the fact that a high employment rate in jobs directly related to your course is one of the biggest factors in how highly rated degrees are.

    When you have courses with 10%-50% employment in related jobs + the rest doing further study or second degrees + a dis proportionally high amount of people rating the said courses prestige and reputation extremely highly, it gets the tag "overrated". Every time you see a post TSR post talking about parents wrongly forcing a user into a course the users doesn't like. The reason is always "jobs".

    Also it's worth adding that there aren't many factors you can use to give an answer to this thread on. E.G I don't like geography since I found it boring. I can't go onto call it overrated with my reasoning being "boring subject and lectures". I'm sure millions around the world find it interesting. I can't call a degree overrated because it has lots of reading. Many people thoroughly enjoy that.

    What other metrics would you use to provide an answer?
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    As an econ undergrad I can say that economics, at an undergraduate level, is very overrated.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    The idea that everyone who does PPE is power mad and think they will be an MP by the age of 25 is pretty daft. Most people who take the course end up working in things like banking, finance, the City in various ways, also mainstream business jobs and lots of other things besides.
    PPE also turns out many lovely, charmingly witty, intelligent and thoughtful people such as yourself, even if you did accidentally end up being a liberal
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    (Original post by lucabrasi98)
    What other metrics would you use to provide an answer?

    I responded to this question just a few comments above, if you're interested. http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...2#post67266572

    Though my response regarding Fullofsurprises might make the same point more succulently
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    (Original post by Athematica)
    PPE also turns out many lovely, charmingly witty, intelligent and thoughtful people such as yourself, even if you did accidentally end up being a liberal
    :lol:
    :hat2:
    I missed the "You Must Become A Hayekian Robo-Droid or Die" lecture at the beginning - must have been sick that day - downhill all the way after that.
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    (Original post by The Joker ~)
    Law ~


    Think about it.. You get to dress up like an idiot and say stupid things.
    Does one need a degree to do that~ ?
    They have to tell stupid things, as they have learnt to reproduce what is written in codes of law. They are not permitted to say their honest opinions to certain cases, they have to be political correct.*
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    To me, Psychology is overrated to those who have a very specific and limited perception of what it is. For example, those who believe it is about reading minds, Freud, Sherlock Holmes, reading minds, Hannibal, Stanford Prison Experiment, Electric shocks, PSYCHIATRY, (which requires a medical degree, not a psychology degree), reading minds etc etc.

    Unfortunately, the scientific side of psychology is covered up by the media and replaced by the social side which makes it seem like a bunch of Freudians analysing body language and predicting future psychopaths. The amount of influence that you can have with a psychology degree (especially postgrad) is immense even within the medical world if you play your cards right.

    But as mentioned before, not many people do, and so they overrate the degree with due to lack of research and an unrealistic opinion of what it is before it has even begun then end up dropping out because it's 'too sciency'. That's where I think the overratedness comes from: the huge amount of people who take for the wrong reasons.

    I assure you, if A-level Psychology taught what Psychology REALLY is, it'd soon show to be one of the most underrated degrees.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    IMO the most overrated degree has to be Law
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    I'll think you'll find most people do a law degree because they want to be lawyers but find out near the end that not everyone can become a lawyer with just a law degree.

    The cliche 'opens so many other doors' is true of 99% of degrees.

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    I wouldn't say there's a most common point where people decide they don't want to work in law. I knew people who never wanted up to people who decided after third year exams.

    While all degrees might open doors law is more effective that most hence why it's employment percentage is so high


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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Dude, you are like the poster boy for the "bitter med school reject" trope. The trouble is that you are also in your 30s, so you really are old enough to know better.

    Medicine is not about rote learning at all, I don't know where you got that idea into your head but it's rubbish. Since the job is fundamentally a practical one which is all about dealing with individuals (who do not fit into black and white paradigms or neat little boxes, despite what you may think), it therefore logically follows that rote learning will be of little value.

    Med school examiners can spot a student who's trying to pass their exams on the back of copious book learning and zero patient contact from a mile off. Such students do not do well. This is not a job for people who do not have lateral thinking skills or are merely looking to be algorithm monkeys.

    And just as an aside, you place way too much value on UKCAT scores. **** me, the rest of the world merely views the UKCAT as a hoop to jump through, not as a way of determining whether an HCA (or whoever) would have made a better doctor than a current med student.
    Dude, if I bash finance it's because I'm not an MD at Goldman Sachs, tech then it's because I never got to work at Google,... The entire world is not jealous of you med students or doctors. I'm glad I pulled my remaining med school interviews without wasting any more time, you are entirely welcome to the job, the colleagues and work environment in the UK. 😉

    In fact the sort of arrogant, stuck up, two faced individuals and their abundance in medicine is one of the main reasons I'm happy with this decision.
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    (Original post by CharlieGEM)
    In fact the sort of arrogant, stuck up, two faced individuals and their abundance in medicine is one of the main reasons I'm happy with this decision.
    The irony here being that some of your posts in this thread have been the nastiest and most stuck up.

    Can't say I've ever come across many of these "abundant" individuals during my work.
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    (Original post by Trinculo)
    Definitely law.

    A degree that is competitive to get into at top universities, but offered by almost all universities due to the simplicity and commercially viable nature of doing so.

    Competitive for places yet half of all practicing lawyers don't have one.

    A degree that can be "created" using a non-competitive postgrad conversion course
    hmm no not really - doing it at under-grad means you can focus your honours on specific areas. For example, I focused my honours on corporate/commercial topics, such as international corporate finance regulation, so I have a good understanding of financial systems and global markets, alongside law. However, some people focus on things such as 'animal welfare law' etc, which imo makes their degree over-rated. Employers can definitely suss you out though when you mention your honours choices.
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    (Original post by CharlieGEM)
    Dude, if I bash finance it's because I'm not an MD at Goldman Sachs, tech then it's because I never got to work at Google,... The entire world is not jealous of you med students or doctors. I'm glad I pulled my remaining med school interviews without wasting any more time, you are entirely welcome to the job, the colleagues and work environment in the UK. 😉

    In fact the sort of arrogant, stuck up, two faced individuals and their abundance in medicine is one of the main reasons I'm happy with this decision.
    Okay sure whatever. But medicine still isn't all about rote memorisation kthxbai.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Okay sure whatever. But medicine still isn't all about rote memorisation kthxbai.
    In terms of the degree itself, which is what we're asking about here (not the career), especially in the more traditional courses, would you say rote memorisation dominates the learning style in medicine, relative to other courses?
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    (Original post by Athematica)
    In terms of the degree itself, which is what we're asking about here (not the career), especially in the more traditional courses, would you say rote memorisation dominates the learning style in medicine, relative to other courses?
    All degree subjects are predominantly memorisation with the exceptions being maths and physics

    I did a tiny smidgen of University level chemistry. I had to memorise tables of molecules; their names, skeletal formula and molecular formula. How is this any different to memorising anatomy?
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    (Original post by Athematica)
    In terms of the degree itself, which is what we're asking about here (not the career), especially in the more traditional courses, would you say rote memorisation dominates the learning style in medicine, relative to other courses?
    Not massively so compared to other life sciences degrees, except for the anatomy.

    There probably is a lot more memorisation compared to say an English degree, but I think that's to be expected. Regardless, I don't think the entire degree (which is 60% practical as opposed to theoretical training) can be negotiated merely on the basis of being a human parrot. Even pre-clinical exam questions nowadays are designed to be applied and clinically oriented, as opposed to merely "draw out this biochemical pathway" or "state all of the insertions and origins of these muscles".
 
 
 
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