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    (Original post by Robbie242)
    This is what I did, I was asking for an alternate solution
    Oh right. Well it's been given
    |expression|=a then expression=\pm{a}
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    (Original post by MathsNerd1)
    Felix has explained it in another post, hopefully that should help you
    yeah it has
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    (Original post by Lackadaisical)
    Do we need to be able to find volumes of rotation around the y-axis in C4?
    Nope. Just around the X.
    Edit: For Edexcel anyway.
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    That response doesn't fill me with much confidence as I'm about to attempt it
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    (Original post by joostan)
    Well:
    \dfrac{d}{dSTUFF}\left(\ln(STUFF  )\right) = \dfrac{1}{STUFF} \times [STUFF]'
    is that a rule of something?:c i dunt recognise it
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    (Original post by MathsNerd1)
    That response doesn't fill me with much confidence as I'm about to attempt it
    Lol - if and when you do it, your username will be justified
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    (Original post by Felix Felicis)
    Anymore hints for this question? :curious: Proof by example's the only way I can think of right now as well :dontknow:
    This is an IMO question. I actually don't know what would work as a good hint but try to factorize a,b,c and d into their primes.

    Anyway, proof by example is not the answer really.
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    (Original post by pureandmodest)
    is that a rule of something?:c i dunt recognise it
    It's essentially the same as saying:
    \dfrac{d}{dx}\left[\ln(f(x))\right] = \dfrac{f'(x)}{f(x)}
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    (Original post by joostan)
    Lol - if and when you do it, your username will be justified
    Right, I'm going to take the entire day if I have to
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    (Original post by joostan)


    The best way to spend your free time
    LOOL, yup
    Mums gonna drag me to all these weddings >.< Some lovely equations will keep my mind at ease loool
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    (Original post by tigerz)
    LOOL, yup
    Mums gonna drag me to all these weddings >.< Some lovely equations will keep my mind at ease loool
    They will indeed
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    Though lovely is dependent on opinion


    (Original post by MathsNerd1)
    Right, I'm going to take the entire day if I have to
    Good luck
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    (Original post by MAyman12)
    This is an IMO question. I actually don't know what would work as a good hint but try to factorize a,b,c and d into their primes.

    Anyway, proof by example is not the answer really.
    Ok, that is ridiculous :zomg: This thread regularly goes off track because people throw around AEA/ STEP level questions but this thread is not for IMO-level questions - very few people on here have the prerequisite knowledge/ training to attempt questions of that standard....questions like that belong on the proof is trivial thread
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    (Original post by joostan)
    It's essentially the same as saying:
    \dfrac{d}{dx}\left[\ln(f(x))\right] = \dfrac{f'(x)}{f(x)}
    I prefer this version
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    (Original post by tigerz)
    Sorry, I didn't mean it in that way I was too intrigued and wanted to know.
    Well basically they made a typo so it became an unsolvable question, obviously after the exam the examiner would scrap those marks but during the exam you'd think you'd lose them

    I dunno, you would know roughly as the boundaries don't change for that specific paper or because its really similar to a past paper? (I'm imagining some complex scenario haha)
    Although i'm guessing your the type that would end up pointing out the error and then solve it correctly >.<
    I was joking :lol: it didn't really offend me!

    I still wouldn't try to even it out because I may have made a silly mistake somewhere in the paper

    Spoiler:
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    While your question is pretty much redundant in real life, to answer the real question - "would you pick 95 or 96 UMS if you had a choice".

    If it made no difference grade-wise, and I had all 100/95 up to then, I'd actually pick 95 for the novelty of having round numbers for all maths modular UMS that might not make much sense but I'm just weird like that I guess

    However, if the streak was already broken, so to speak, I'd pick 96. If you'd asked me before results day for the Jan exams, I'd definitely have picked 96.
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    (Original post by joostan)
    It's essentially the same as saying:
    \dfrac{d}{dx}\left[\ln(f(x))\right] = \dfrac{f'(x)}{f(x)}
    i dont get how...
    1/3ln(x+1/2) doesn't click with me that way ._.
    the top isn't the differential of the bottom so um
    how does that work
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    (Original post by Felix Felicis)
    Ok, that is ridiculous :zomg: This thread regularly goes off track because people throw around AEA/ STEP level questions but this thread is not for IMO-level questions - very few people on here have the prerequisite knowledge/ training to attempt questions of that standard....questions like that belong on the proof is trivial thread
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    Pot. Kettle. Black.
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    (Original post by joostan)
    Spoiler:
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    Pot. Kettle. Black.
    Shush
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    (Original post by joostan)
    They will indeed
    Spoiler:
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    Though lovely is dependent on opinion



    Good luck
    Haha, lovely in appearance, evil in reality
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    ( the equations that is)
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    (Original post by pureandmodest)
    i dont get how...
    1/3ln(x+1/2) doesn't click with me that way ._.
    the top isn't the differential of the bottom so um
    how does that work
    Well what is \dfrac{d}{dx}\left(x+\frac{1}{2}  \right)?

    (Original post by Felix Felicis)
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    Sowwy. :cry2:


    (Original post by tigerz)
    Haha, lovely in appearance, evil in reality
    Spoiler:
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    ( the equations that is)
    There's no such thing! :eek:
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    (Original post by Felix Felicis)
    Ok, that is ridiculous :zomg: This thread regularly goes off track because people throw around AEA/ STEP level questions but this thread is not for IMO-level questions - very few people on here have the prerequisite knowledge/ training to attempt questions of that standard....questions like that belong on the proof is trivial thread
    Surely it's too easy to be an IMO question? Unless proof by example isn't allowed for some reason.
 
 
 
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