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    For the Half cell 6 marker there was literally only 2 reactions possible. 1 and 2,6 and 7.

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    (Original post by LaraDresser)
    It might be the case that you didn't double the hydration of potassium...
    It seems like she did tbh. I think her mistake was with the 24 maybe?
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    (Original post by HFancy1997)
    For the Half cell 6 marker there was literally only 2 reactions possible. 1 and 2,6 and 7.

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    That is correct.
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    (Original post by BioStudentx)
    Actually the number of A*s aren't constant. As i've had to explain to many people (multiple times). Last year 9.4% got an A*, another year only 8.3% got an A*. For chemistry, there has never been more than 9.4% getting an A* ( and that was last year!). Students are getting better but they don't want more and more people getting A*s so grade boundaries will become more and more unfair.
    Thank you for explaining this. I understand why people want lowered boundaries (believe me I'd kill for lower boundaries too) But its harsh reality.
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    (Original post by joeteeeeee)
    If so, these would be the highest grade boundaries IN RECORDED HISTORY for an A2 F325 exam. We sat A2 chemistry not bloody btec level 1 cooking
    :toofunny:
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    (Original post by BioStudentx)
    Actually the number of A*s aren't constant. As i've had to explain to many people (multiple times). Last year 9.4% got an A*, another year only 8.3% got an A*. For chemistry, there has never been more than 9.4% getting an A* ( and that was last year!). Students are getting better but they don't want more and more people getting A*s so grade boundaries will become more and more unfair.
    The point still stands even if the numbers aren't exact, I don't believe that 8.3% of my year group in chemistry got over 90% on that exam lol. Also my college consistently performs above average at chemistry. If you ask me, that paper was probably easier than any previous EEE paper APART from 2015, therefore I am expecting boundaries between 2014 and 2015 so somewhere around 92 or 93 for full ums. To say it will be higher than 95 for full ums is a complete and utter joke, especially when you consider that the crazy high ums from last year in EEE was probably caused, at least in part, by the crazy low ums in last years RPA, with 50/60 getting you 90/90UMS
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    (Original post by k.russell)
    Ok think about everyone who does chemistry in your school (assuming your school is about average). Do you reckon 1/10 of them got over 90% on that exam?
    No, I don't think so, but I will assume that 7/10 got 67% or above
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    (Original post by HFancy1997)
    For the Half cell 6 marker there was literally only 2 reactions possible. 1 and 2,6 and 7.

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    I know you had to use Cr3+ in your answers... it was about using Cr3+ as a reducing or oxidising agent. Are we talking about the same question?
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    Is there an unofficial mark scheme or nah?
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    (Original post by k.russell)
    with 50/60 getting you 90/90UMS
    Last year's paper caused an uproar due to the unfamiliarity of the questions. This year's paper had a more positive response.

    There is deffo a correlation between grade boundaries and the opinions of students on their chem papers.
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    (Original post by LaraDresser)
    It might be the case that you didn't double the hydration of potassium...
    Yes I think it's something to do with that, because first time round I drew my cycle incorrectly (someone was bloody playing the drums in the adjacent room and I couldn't hear myself think) and in the last few minutes of the exam I noticed and corrected it, but it must've had an affect on my calculation. Bummer
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    Just what wondering what y'all put for the solution you would add for the S2O32-/I2 titration. I put starch but idk seems weird to me
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    (Original post by k.russell)
    The point still stands even if the numbers aren't exact, I don't believe that 8.3% of my year group in chemistry got over 90% on that exam lol. Also my college consistently performs above average at chemistry. If you ask me, that paper was probably easier than any previous EEE paper APART from 2015, therefore I am expecting boundaries between 2014 and 2015 so somewhere around 92 or 93 for full ums. To say it will be higher than 95 for full ums is a complete and utter joke, especially when you consider that the crazy high ums from last year in EEE was probably caused, at least in part, by the crazy low ums in last years RPA, with 50/60 getting you 90/90UMS
    But again, an A* in chemistry averages all 3 units. Most students get near full marks on coursework due to cheating, students will score high on F324 and they don't have to get an A* in F325 to average an A* in Chemistry... Bottom line, 8.3% getting an A* in chemistry is not the same thing as 8.3% getting an A* in F325. And I do believe around 8% of population would get above 88 in that exam (which is my prediction for an A*). A few good private schools will skew the results too.
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    (Original post by Hughseff)
    Just what wondering what y'all put for the solution you would add for the S2O32-/I2 titration. I put starch but idk seems weird to me
    yeah starch then dark blue to colourless
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    (Original post by BioStudentx)
    But again, an A* in chemistry averages all 3 units. Most students get near full marks on coursework due to cheating, students will score high on F324 and they don't have to get an A* in F325 to average an A* in Chemistry... Bottom line, 8.3% getting an A* in chemistry is not the same thing as 8.3% getting an A* in F325. And I do believe around 8% of population would get above 88 in that exam (which is my prediction for an A*). A few good private schools will skew the results too.
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    Do you get marks for an answer that is correct but crossed out and an alternative answer is given?
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    (Original post by Haiku786)
    Do you get marks for an answer that is correct but crossed out and an alternative answer is given?
    If you crossed out a correct answer and wrote an alternative that is incorrect - no, you won't get marks for the crossed out correct answer.
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    (Original post by steph-carys)
    Well I actually got around -1176 and most people are saying -1099 which I'm guessing is correct as the majority have it. And I can't see what I would've done to f up..
    I got that answer too and I definitely doubled the value for hydration of K so not sure what went wrong
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    (Original post by smartalan73)
    I got that answer too and I definitely doubled the value for hydration of K so not sure what went wrong
    Wait, you got -1176?1 cause my other friend got this too! And I'm racking my brain on where I could've gone wrong... maybe something to do with signs?
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    what did everyone put for the last Q when they asked for a suitable copper compound and its ionic and overall equation?
 
 
 
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