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    Oh ok, so I don't need to rush anything, I can do it next year. Thanks
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    £12,000 (could be £14,000 if I get another summer job, should find out soonish).
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    I just as it happens worked this out earlier on....

    I will be receiving a bursary of £7000 per year from the University, on top of a £3,400 grant from the student finance. I've therefore chosen not to take out any student loans apart from the tuition fee status.

    I'm also eligible for a £1000 a year bursary, with this in consideration I will recieve £11,400 a year, my accommodation is £4945 which leaves me with approx £124 a week to live on. However i'll take a job alongside so I can save money.

    I do understand that i'm in a very fortunate position and the bursaries I have applied for are based upon my household income which is below £16,000. I will receive nothing from my mam and my dad has never paid a penny in his life for me, so i'm literally on my own with finance, so i'm very grateful for the bursary.
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    Well my loan comes up £1000 short of my accommodation costs because of the stupid means tested system so my parents have to make that up. And they'll be giving me about £80 a week to live on. Isn't it great how people are actually punished for earning too much money
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    (Original post by ed-)
    Well my loan comes up £1000 short of my accommodation costs because of the stupid means tested system so my parents have to make that up. And they'll be giving me about £80 a week to live on. Isn't it great how people are actually punished for earning too much money
    Its such a shame isn't it, you're clearly so hard done by. You still get more money than someone on a low income with the full grant.

    The fact you parents have the ability to and are clearly willing to support you with as much as £80 a week to live off leaves you no reason to moan!

    Feel sorry for those with parents that earn a liveable wage and cannot top up their children's maintenance loan.

    You sound spoilt.

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    Everything I have to pay for - rent, bills, food etc is covered from work. So I have whatever is left from my wages plus my entire student loan as disposable income. Which is an awful lot considering I get the maximum grant and a bursary from the university. As this is my final year i'm going to save as much as I can this year incase I end up on the graduate scrapheap. I have zero intention of moving back home.

    (Original post by Bobilina)
    I will be receiving a bursary of £7000 per year from the University,.
    Wow, and I thought the £1500 my university gives me was generous :lolwut:

    The contrasts on this thread are staggering. It's either one extreme or the other.
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    My accomodation is a ridiculous £120 a week, that said it still leaves me with £75 a week plus I get a £3000 ahead bursary from uea based on household income so I'm hoping to set aside 50 a week for a rainy day!

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    Well my Dad is giving me £200 each month, basically the money he gave to my mum to help support me so that's £50 a week and after my accommodation is taken off and my university bursary is put on I will get an additional £110 a week to live off of, then I already have pretty much £5,000 saved up from my jobs and continue to keep a part time job going which will get me another £80 a week. If I don't have enough to live off of then I'll be ashamed on how I can't budget.
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    I'll be living off around £110 per week after bills have been paid, so as it will be disposable income from my loan and job I will be putting some away in savings and buying some new clothes as I've not bought new stuff for ages
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    I thought I was going away to uni to get some real independence from my parents now I realise I'll be begging them for money on a weekly basis just to eat. Oh well I'm excited for uni
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    (Original post by Bobilina)
    I just as it happens worked this out earlier on....

    I will be receiving a bursary of £7000 per year from the University, on top of a £3,400 grant from the student finance. I've therefore chosen not to take out any student loans apart from the tuition fee status.

    I'm also eligible for a £1000 a year bursary, with this in consideration I will recieve £11,400 a year, my accommodation is £4945 which leaves me with approx £124 a week to live on. However i'll take a job alongside so I can save money.

    I do understand that i'm in a very fortunate position and the bursaries I have applied for are based upon my household income which is below £16,000. I will receive nothing from my mam and my dad has never paid a penny in his life for me, so i'm literally on my own with finance, so i'm very grateful for the bursary.
    This has to be Warwick or Oxbridge?
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    (Original post by sr90)
    Everything I have to pay for - rent, bills, food etc is covered from work. So I have whatever is left from my wages plus my entire student loan as disposable income. Which is an awful lot considering I get the maximum grant and a bursary from the university. As this is my final year i'm going to save as much as I can this year incase I end up on the graduate scrapheap. I have zero intention of moving back home.



    Wow, and I thought the £1500 my university gives me was generous :lolwut:

    The contrasts on this thread are staggering. It's either one extreme or the other.
    Yeah I know, it's unreal.... All thanks to skint parents!
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    (Original post by aidbro)
    Its such a shame isn't it, you're clearly so hard done by. You still get more money than someone on a low income with the full grant.

    The fact you parents have the ability to and are clearly willing to support you with as much as £80 a week to live off leaves you no reason to moan!

    Feel sorry for those with parents that earn a liveable wage and cannot top up their children's maintenance loan.

    You sound spoilt.

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    You clearly didn't read the post above mine did you? Yeah I really seem better off...

    Yes they have the ability and are willing but why should they have to?
    My parents have both worked hard their whole lives to get a good job. They've already spent enough on my education to get me to uni and now they have to fund me through it too because they worked hard?
    Why bother working hard when it seems you and your children are better off, or at least in the same position, when you don't bother?
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    Funny thing is that I would stake my measly loan on the fact that the proportion of students who get very small loans and have parents who are well off and able to support them (willing and ability is different) through uni is very similar to the proportion of students who are on full grant/loan and are literally penniless at home/went to the local comp. Plenty of students at top grammar schools living in affluent areas are getting the big grants etc. Separated households is the big one, along with self employment.

    People really do underestimate just how many people are blowing their loans on Topshop hauls and summer jaunts abroad.
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    (Original post by ed-)
    You clearly didn't read the post above mine did you? Yeah I really seem better off...

    Yes they have the ability and are willing but why should they have to?
    My parents have both worked hard their whole lives to get a good job. They've already spent enough on my education to get me to uni and now they have to fund me through it too because they worked hard?
    Why bother working hard when it seems you and your children are better off, or at least in the same position, when you don't bother?
    There's a finite amount of money, in an ideal world every student would get a huge student loan but we don't live in an ideal world. Your parents can afford to give you plenty while you're at university meaning that the government don't have to, and can better allocate their resources, my parents cannot and if my student loan didn't cover my accommodation etc I would not be going to university, simple as that.

    I find the amount of rich kids in this thread winging hysterical, so **** if you don't get a few more grand to study, I haven't had a holiday in about 10 years, I've worked since I was 16 and for three short years I'm going to be better off than you yet you complain, it's laughable.
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    Juan-Million Dollars!
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    (Original post by Conzy210)
    There's a finite amount of money, in an ideal world every student would get a huge student loan but we don't live in an ideal world. Your parents can afford to give you plenty while you're at university meaning that the government don't have to, and can better allocate their resources, my parents cannot and if my student loan didn't cover my accommodation etc I would not be going to university, simple as that.

    I find the amount of rich kids in this thread winging hysterical, so **** if you don't get a few more grand to study, I haven't had a holiday in about 10 years, I've worked since I was 16 and for three short years I'm going to be better off than you yet you complain, it's laughable.
    Thing is bud, that people on here have a distorted version of reality.

    Two parents at the peak of their earning on 26k =52k. No grant. around 4.5k loan. That is not rich. Comfortable is even pushing it. I would be pretty gutted to earn 26k when I'm pushing 60 in London.

    That's my biggest gripe with the whole thing. People assuming that you're rich because you don't get a loan/grant.

    I've worked since I was 16, haven't had a family holiday ever. Yet because your parents are broke and mine are careless and a little better off than you I suffer.

    I worked full time for a year and earned around 18k. Anything below that is not a good salary in my book, yet I'm hearing off people within a household income of 12k with two 'working' parents?

    This arguments just goes round and round. Seems like noone is able to see it from alternating viewpoints.

    To be honest, I just think some people get too much. When you're able to save a couple of thousands of your loan per year, you're clearly getting too much. I'm quite content to live frugally like a student, but why do some people get £9000 per year incld uni bursaries? Are my parents meant to fork out an additional 5k across the year to level the playing field?
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    I'm going to do my best to keep it around the £60/week mark, thing is I'm living in London so tube fare will probably take up a fair chunk of money. That is until I bring my bike up. I'm hoping to get work as a bicycle courier at some point, the hours are quite flexible and it will help with my training
    Since it seems a lot of people are mentioning bursaries, etc, I thought that I'd add that I get a £1000 bursary from my Uni and the £3000 scholarship from the National Scholarship Programme, but at least £2000 of that is used as a fee waiver. Like a lot of people on here, this is due to low income. Our household income is under £10,000 because my mother has a chronic illness.
    I'm going to try and cut down my bills by using super cheap recipes, if anyone's interested the website I use is here;http://agirlcalledjack.com/category/...udget-recipes/
    You make most of the recipes in bulk and there's hardly any waste left over.
    The woman behind the website is incredible, she's had to support herself and her son on a ridiculous amount of money.
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    (Original post by ed-)
    You clearly didn't read the post above mine did you? Yeah I really seem better off...

    Yes they have the ability and are willing but why should they have to?
    My parents have both worked hard their whole lives to get a good job. They've already spent enough on my education to get me to uni and now they have to fund me through it too because they worked hard?
    Why bother working hard when it seems you and your children are better off, or at least in the same position, when you don't bother?
    It's not the same position though is it? If you took your parents' incomes and subtracted their contribution to your accommodation + the £80 per week they're giving you it will not equal even the higher end of the 'low income' bracket to get the full grant. It's also likely you'll still have more than lower income students from things you haven't thought of including like a better laptop/phone/other gadgets you already own, having more spent on you on your birthday and at Christmas, being able to go to your parents if you need more money for something important etc. If you look at the whole picture and not just how much physical money you get compared to them you are better off.

    Also it's not because they worked hard that they have to help with your funding, it's because they earn a lot. Student Finance don't monitor parents in their workplaces. The reason they give the most money to students from low-income backgrounds is because their parents could not afford to pay that money for them if they didn't.
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    (Original post by Cutmeloose)
    Thing is bud, that people on here have a distorted version of reality.

    Two parents at the peak of their earning on 26k =52k. No grant. around 4.5k loan. That is not rich. Comfortable is even pushing it. I would be pretty gutted to earn 26k when I'm pushing 60 in London.

    That's my biggest gripe with the whole thing. People assuming that you're rich because you don't get a loan/grant.

    I've worked since I was 16, haven't had a family holiday ever. Yet because your parents are broke and mine are careless and a little better off than you I suffer.

    I worked full time for a year and earned around 18k. Anything below that is not a good salary in my book, yet I'm hearing off people within a household income of 12k with two 'working' parents?

    This arguments just goes round and round. Seems like noone is able to see it from alternating viewpoints.

    To be honest, I just think some people get too much. When you're able to save a couple of thousands of your loan per year, you're clearly getting too much. I'm quite content to live frugally like a student, but why do some people get £9000 per year incld uni bursaries? Are my parents meant to fork out an additional 5k across the year to level the playing field?
    I'm not saying the system is perfect, far from it, it just gripes me to see people from families that can afford to support them at university complain.

    The people who are well within their rights to complain are those people who have two working parents, with a mortgage, maybe a few other kids to support and don't receive much of a loan. The system has well and truly ****ed these people, but if you're in a family earning 100k and are annoyed because they're maybe not willing to give you what people on maximum loan receive I have absolutely no sympathy for you.

    I have above £9000 a year after I receive my university bursary, however I still don't feel I'm going to be well off compared to some people and I certainly won't be able to save any, I'll be getting all my own books, clothes as well as paying my travel home etc but I understand this isn't the same for everyone who receives that much.

    The biggest issue is that everyone's circumstances vary so much and that without a massively complex system that relies on people being 100% honest there isn't much Student Finance can do.
 
 
 
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