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    (Original post by pandagere)
    Apart from the introduction of clinical commissioning groups and greater hours for GPs, what other relevant things have come about from the NHS reforms?

    I'm not so good on these current medical issues/NHS politics.

    As mynameisntbobk said and from what I've read it's encouraging greater competition between private sectors and NHS providers by converting(??) hospitals to foundation trusts so they all compete for 'contracts' such as an MRI scan from the Clinical commissioning groups (which is what replaced the primary care trusts).



    Someone correct me if I'm wrong!
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    (Original post by g.k.galloway)
    Yeah I thought that too, I need to think about it more
    Jeepers that is strange....haha
    I know what they are meant to be testing for
    That's good, use that knowledge, look on youtube for example MMIs (just type in MMI) and think which ones would best test the traits for which they are looking. You will probably have a role-playing station and a maths station along the way. Keep up the traditional side and get a mock interview to help. It is hard, but go in confident and don't worry if you mess up on one station, start again at the next one!
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    (Original post by thefiretailedpony)
    Well thats...weird O.o Anything else u can tell us? When was ur interview?
    Mine was in January, and trust me when I say that wasn't the weirdest part!! The stations will obviously vary, there may be maths station, a station where you have to read an article then answer questions on it, and probably some sort of role-playing scenario. Look on youtube, they have a wide range of practice MMIs - practice skim reading and brush up basic maths!! Try to think about how you would go about showing the traits they are looking for in the way you behave. So if you have to work in a group don't be loud and obnoxious but make sure you listen to other ideas, and make sure you get everyone to talk and get involved. The good thing with MMIs is that if you muck up on one of them it's not the end of the world, just don't allow it to affect your other stations!
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    (Original post by FreyaCat)
    Two of mine are MMI and I have no idea what to expect/how to prepare any advice?
    Sorry for late reply, I had to be up at 5.30am, so needed an early night!! Youtube would be a good place to start, it has a lot of practice MMIs. They should give you a list of things for which they will be testing. Use this knowledge to anticipate the sort of stations, so if they are looking at caring, they may give you a role-playing scenario where you have to show an ability to care, maybe in a nursing role or something. The mock MMIs online will help with this as you can see what they are testing for and see whether or not it would apply to any of the ones in your lists. They are difficult to prepare for, but it is all about attitudes, go in with confidence, and if you muck up don't let it affect the other stations! Good Luck xx
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    (Original post by IonicBond1)
    By the way guys, are any of you applying to MMI universities, and if so, are you prepared for a VERY different interview style to the basic question and answer style? (I had an interview at Leicester, and trust me when I say it was the weirdest 56 minutes of life!)
    I'm applying to MMI Uni's- what do you mean bu very different lol
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    (Original post by pandagere)
    Apart from the introduction of clinical commissioning groups and greater hours for GPs, what other relevant things have come about from the NHS reforms?

    I'm not so good on these current medical issues/NHS politics.
    And medical tourism- been in news as of late
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    How much prep has everyone done for interview?
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    (Original post by prafto)
    I'm applying to MMI Uni's- what do you mean bu very different lol
    A lot of the station probably won't be based around an interviewer asking you questions and you giving answers. There may be an element of maths, you may watch a video of someone taking a history and then write down what went well in the video and what went badly. One friend had to make a picture using hama beads!! The point is, don't expect them to all just be simple question and answer. They find information out by testing a wider range of mediums, such as writing, role-playing, teamwork etc. So although keep practicing traditional have a look on youtube for some practice MMI stations, just so you can see some of the other things that you could be asked to do. The good thing about MMIs is that if you do muck up, it's not the end of the world, just start over at the next station, you can't do that in a traditional interview! x
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    does anyone know what happened to strategic health authorities?
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    (Original post by IonicBond1)
    Sorry for late reply, I had to be up at 5.30am, so needed an early night!! Youtube would be a good place to start, it has a lot of practice MMIs. They should give you a list of things for which they will be testing. Use this knowledge to anticipate the sort of stations, so if they are looking at caring, they may give you a role-playing scenario where you have to show an ability to care, maybe in a nursing role or something. The mock MMIs online will help with this as you can see what they are testing for and see whether or not it would apply to any of the ones in your lists. They are difficult to prepare for, but it is all about attitudes, go in with confidence, and if you muck up don't let it affect the other stations! Good Luck xx
    No problem. Thank you, I'll take a look at on youtube then. I have to admit appearing confident is probably my biggest issue :/. Thank you xx
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    (Original post by FreyaCat)
    No problem. Thank you, I'll take a look at on youtube then. I have to admit appearing confident is probably my biggest issue :/. Thank you xx
    Your welcome. The thing with confidence is, you don't have to be confident to appear it! Everyone will be nervous, but never be afraid to speak and let your opinions known. Keep your voice loud (not shouting) and clear. It's not about showing you don't have any nerves, it's about showing you can stand tall even with them!! (Oh dear I feel like a philosopher right now... maybe the drinking started too early!!) Confidence will come with practice, do mock interviews, even if it's just the normal ones, ask to do presentations in class about topics so you get use to speaking in front of people, you have plenty of time to act the part don't worry x
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    Question:

    A patient, aged17 is badly injured in his back and the doctor advises him to take a couple of weeks break from physical activity. The patient has a football competition in 5 days time, he insists that he has to play and he begs the doctor to not tell his coach.

    What do you do?
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    Also, when a patient is admitted and is sedated/in ICU, how much information can we give to the next of kin or any other family members?

    Don't we need patients explicit consent to tell others??
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    (Original post by FlavaFavourFruit)
    Question:

    A patient, aged17 is badly injured in his back and the doctor advises him to take a couple of weeks break from physical activity. The patient has a football competition in 5 days time, he insists that he has to play and he begs the doctor to not tell his coach.

    What do you do?
    According to the "gillick competence and fraser guidelines", the patient would thereby be competent as he is over the age of 16. Parental involvement/consent is not needed or required in this instance. Other than his age, we will have to use our clinical judgement to examine his psychological status. We will have to see if he is capable to understand the information he is being given and that he comprehends the consequences of what his decision may lead to. If he is able to communicate his decision, and is deemed, by the medical staff, to be competent and have the capacity to make decisions for himself, than I am led believe that we can not do anything against his orders. We will have to attempt to persuade him and give him all the information of the events/misfortunes that may occur if he goes against our advise. However, if the patient does not pass the competence test, then it is a doctor's role to judge and act in the patients best interest which is to tell his coach about his broken back. Working within a multidisciplinary team, the opinions and comments of the clinical staff will also have to be taken account before deciding the former.
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    (Original post by frogs r everywhere)
    According to the "gillick competence and fraser guidelines", the patient would thereby be competent as he is over the age of 16. Parental involvement/consent is not needed or required in this instance. Other than his age, we will have to use our clinical judgement to examine his psychological status. We will have to see if he is capable to understand the information he is being given and that he comprehends the consequences of what his decision may lead to. If he is able to communicate his decision, and is deemed, by the medical staff, to be competent and have the capacity to make decisions for himself, than I am led believe that we can not do anything against his orders. We will have to attempt to persuade him and give him all the information of the events/misfortunes that may occur if he goes against our advise. However, if the patient does not pass the competence test, then it is a doctor's role to judge and act in the patients best interest which is to tell his coach about his broken back. Working within a multidisciplinary team, the opinions and comments of other clinical staff will also have to be taken account before deciding the former.
    Nice! But no matter what the doctor says, the boy will play football. I though it would be in his best interests to tell the coach so he can be restricted from playing...
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    (Original post by FlavaFavourFruit)
    Nice! But no matter what the doctor says, the boy will play football. I though it would be in his best interests to tell the coach so he can be restricted from playing...
    Yes, it would certainly be in the patient's best interest to tell the coach. The link below also gives an interesting point:

    "Even when patients have had sufficient time to make decisions, some still appear worryingly unrealistic about their ability to manage. There is evidence to suggest that patients find it difficult to assimilate new information, in particular about risks when becoming adamant about their decision", which may apply in this scenario.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2600129/

    It really depends on your judgement and the type of patient you have. But if he clearly has the capacity to make decisions, and is psychologically sound, should we still tell the coach about his back pain? My former argument says that we shouldn't, but I am having second thoughts.
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    (Original post by frogs r everywhere)
    Yes, it would certainly be in the patient's best interest to tell the coach. The link below also gives an interesting point:

    "Even when patients have had sufficient time to make decisions, some still appear worryingly unrealistic about their ability to manage. There is evidence to suggest that patients find it difficult to assimilate new information, in particular about risks when becoming adamant about their decision", which may apply in this scenario.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2600129/

    It really depends on your judgement and the type of patient you have. But if he clearly has the capacity to make decisions, and is psychologically sound, should we still tell the coach about his back pain? My former argument says that we shouldn't, but I am having second thoughts.
    That's interesting and it would apply indeed but when I found this question , I said to myself that I would tell the coach straight away because if the boy plays , he could injure his back even more and cause serious complications and as docs we have to always act in patients best interests
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    Do you deem the boy to be competent? Confidentiality is also at the heart of medical treatment, don't forget that..
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    (Original post by TattyBoJangles)
    Do you deem the boy to be competent? Confidentiality is also at the heart of medical treatment, don't forget that..
    The boy is competent. Confidentiality is important but it can be broken if the patient is at risk of harm...does this scenario mean the boy is at risk of harm if he plays, I believe so.
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    (Original post by FlavaFavourFruit)
    Question:

    A patient, aged17 is badly injured in his back and the doctor advises him to take a couple of weeks break from physical activity. The patient has a football competition in 5 days time, he insists that he has to play and he begs the doctor to not tell his coach.

    What do you do?
    Explain the consequences, ensure he understands them, document meticulously and leave him to be a stupid teenage boy. :p:

    (Original post by FlavaFavourFruit)
    Also, when a patient is admitted and is sedated/in ICU, how much information can we give to the next of kin or any other family members?

    Don't we need patients explicit consent to tell others??
    Yes, in an ideal world you do, but that's obviously not possible if a patient's been admitted as an emergency and can't give consent. You have to make a best guess at what they would want their family to know - if you had a relative on ICU and the doctors wouldn't tell you a thing wouldn't you be going crazy? Usually it's better to give information face to face rather than over the phone, both for giving practical support and for identification purposes. It's rather messy though.
 
 
 
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